sophiastar
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#1
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My first year 11 lesson did not go as well as planned, I really struggled with managing the behaviour such as students talking over me and talking over each other. I used the behaviour system put in place by the school, but this did not seem to do anything other than cause more disruption.

My Feedback from the teacher highlighted how I was unable to manage the behaviour in this particularly and informed me that if I don't improve he will have to raise cause of concern.

Does anyone have any advice with this? or tips in managing the older kids.
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bluebeetle
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#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by sophiastar)
My first year 11 lesson did not go as well as planned, I really struggled with managing the behaviour such as students talking over me and talking over each other. I used the behaviour system put in place by the school, but this did not seem to do anything other than cause more disruption.

My Feedback from the teacher highlighted how I was unable to manage the behaviour in this particularly and informed me that if I don't improve he will have to raise cause of concern.

Does anyone have any advice with this? or tips in managing the older kids.
The observer should have provided you with constructive feedback on how you can improve your behaviour management with that class. If he didn't do this, then I would recommend asking for some further feedback. In general, it seems pretty harsh to make threats of a cause for concern if it was your very first lesson with the class.

A few general pieces of advice:

- Stringently follow the behaviour system, and be extremely clear at each stage of it as to what the student has done wrong and what the next step will be, for example "I'm giving you a final warning because you were talking when I asked for silence, if this behaviour continues then you'll get a lunchtime detention."

- If at all possible, try to have conversations about behaviour issues quietly with the individual student rather than in front of everybody. Don't engage with questions about behaviour in front of the whole class, just come back to "I'll talk to you privately about your behaviour after I've finished explaining this to everybody."

- Don't shout over students. Wait for silence before doing any proper teaching. Of course, you might have to raise your voice to initially catch their attention, but if you are teaching content, they should be silent.

- Try to praise students more than you are telling them off, and be specific with what you are praising them for. I find at the start of a lesson, it'll be a bit chaotic sometimes until I start with "Good start, Gemma, I can see you've got your book open and you've written the title already." etc. praising everybody who's following instructions by name. Then if you need to tell them off later, you can remind them of the praise they did earn earlier, use that to remind them that they are capable of doing some good work.

- Always have something on the board / on the desks that students can be getting on with. A big cause of disruption can be that kids who are usually okay with just getting on with some work get bored while they wait for the very disruptive kids to be dealt with, and so themselves become disruptive. Having something to get on with can avoid this lower level disruption.
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ThursdaysChild22
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#3
Report 2 weeks ago
#3
Year 11s are hard for a trainee to pick up. Unlike the younger years, they know you’re inexperienced and they can be resentful that they aren’t being taught by a “proper” teacher in their GCSE year. Your mentor should be speaking to the class, reinforcing expectations and challenging them when they do not follow your instructions. They should be supporting you, and (assuming that you’re following the behaviour policy and your management of other classes is fine) they should not be threatening you with a cause for concern. Raise this with your uni tutor now so that there’s a paper trail established and you can challenge if your mentor does decide to go down the cause for concern/failed placement route.
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Muttley79
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#4
Report 2 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by sophiastar)
My first year 11 lesson did not go as well as planned, I really struggled with managing the behaviour such as students talking over me and talking over each other. I used the behaviour system put in place by the school, but this did not seem to do anything other than cause more disruption.

My Feedback from the teacher highlighted how I was unable to manage the behaviour in this particularly and informed me that if I don't improve he will have to raise cause of concern.

Does anyone have any advice with this? or tips in managing the older kids.
It's quite unusual to be given a Year 11 class so don't be too downhearted. Have you observed this class before you taught them? If not them ask the usual teacher to let you see them in action - this feedback seems unhelpful and harsh and not the sort I would give.
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