How to mask stimming?

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
Hi, I'm autistic and until recently have had no trouble stimming in front of other people. Now I keep on feeling the need to stim in lessons and I'm scared I'm distracting other people.
It's really loud in the classroom and it really affects me. Like, in music the other day the music was really loud and I needed to stim but I couldn't so it built up and built up and in the end, I asked to go to the toilet and was stimming so much I bruised all up the side of my hand. I really need to be able to mask it I'm also getting really bad sensory overload recently, I play an instrument and I can't even play it without getting sensory overload and it's really affecting me. Please someone help
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A.G.G.
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#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
Hey, I hope you’re doing well!!! I believe that you should talk this through with someone you trust, that way they can help you. 😊

This might be helpful?: https://www.autismparentingmagazine....ent-and-types/
Tips for reducing stimming behaviors
In most cases, stimming is not harmful and does not need to be stopped or suppressed. Karen Wang, author of the book My Baby Rides the Short Bus: The Unabashedly Human Experience of Raising Kids With Disabilities, believes that any stim eliminated by a caregiver is likely to be replaced with a new one.
Despite this, some parents might want to reduce a particular stimming behavior to avoid self injury or help maintain a level of social acceptability. For example, a caregiver might use an autism helmet to prevent a child from injuring him/herself when head banging.
If you are concerned for your child’s safety, here are some more ideas for reducing stimming behaviors.
Rule out medical conditions
Some medical conditions like ear infections, migraines, and physical pain can worsen stimming behaviors in autistic people, so it’s important to have this checked and addressed as soon as possible. It can be particularly hard to tell if a medical issue is present if your child is non-verbal, so it’s worth visiting your doctor regularly. If a medical condition is the reason for the stimming, it could reduce or stop completely with treatment and support.
Encourage exercise
Studies have shown physical activities can release tension and reduce stimming in people with autism. Engaging autistic people to exercise for a few minutes every day might help stop stimming to some extent.
Create a calm, safe environment
Ensure your home is a safe, quiet space in order to prevent stress and anxiety (which can often cause stimming). Your child’s home should be a place where most outside factors that trigger stimming are avoided, creating the best possible environment for the child.
Use stims as a reward
The use of a stimming behavior can be offered as a reward after a challenging activity. This might sound strange, but adopting this strategy means the child with autism has the freedom to express him/herself in a way that he/she chooses (and he/she might stim less throughout the rest of the day) (Moore, 2008).
Managing stimming through self-regulation
While there are many approaches parents and caregivers can take to help manage a child’s stims, the most effective might be to work towards instilling self-regulation. It is widely believed that stimming can reduce when a child learns to manage his/her emotions.


I really hope this is helpful, but make sure to talk to someone, it might make you feel better, you might also feel like you have lifted some weight from your shoulders. I’m 17 and never met an autistic person but I think now is my chance to help one. 😊
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Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by A.G.G.)
Hey, I hope you’re doing well!!! I believe that you should talk this through with someone you trust, that way they can help you. 😊

This might be helpful?: https://www.autismparentingmagazine....ent-and-types/
Tips for reducing stimming behaviors
In most cases, stimming is not harmful and does not need to be stopped or suppressed. Karen Wang, author of the book My Baby Rides the Short Bus: The Unabashedly Human Experience of Raising Kids With Disabilities, believes that any stim eliminated by a caregiver is likely to be replaced with a new one.
Despite this, some parents might want to reduce a particular stimming behavior to avoid self injury or help maintain a level of social acceptability. For example, a caregiver might use an autism helmet to prevent a child from injuring him/herself when head banging.
If you are concerned for your child’s safety, here are some more ideas for reducing stimming behaviors.
Rule out medical conditions
Some medical conditions like ear infections, migraines, and physical pain can worsen stimming behaviors in autistic people, so it’s important to have this checked and addressed as soon as possible. It can be particularly hard to tell if a medical issue is present if your child is non-verbal, so it’s worth visiting your doctor regularly. If a medical condition is the reason for the stimming, it could reduce or stop completely with treatment and support.
Encourage exercise
Studies have shown physical activities can release tension and reduce stimming in people with autism. Engaging autistic people to exercise for a few minutes every day might help stop stimming to some extent.
Create a calm, safe environment
Ensure your home is a safe, quiet space in order to prevent stress and anxiety (which can often cause stimming). Your child’s home should be a place where most outside factors that trigger stimming are avoided, creating the best possible environment for the child.
Use stims as a reward
The use of a stimming behavior can be offered as a reward after a challenging activity. This might sound strange, but adopting this strategy means the child with autism has the freedom to express him/herself in a way that he/she chooses (and he/she might stim less throughout the rest of the day) (Moore, 2008).
Managing stimming through self-regulation
While there are many approaches parents and caregivers can take to help manage a child’s stims, the most effective might be to work towards instilling self-regulation. It is widely believed that stimming can reduce when a child learns to manage his/her emotions.


I really hope this is helpful, but make sure to talk to someone, it might make you feel better, you might also feel like you have lifted some weight from your shoulders. I’m 17 and never met an autistic person but I think now is my chance to help one. 😊
Thank you so much I literally just turned 15 on Saturday. This is really helpful thank you
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A.G.G.
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#4
Report 2 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by Anonymous)
Thank you so much I literally just turned 15 on Saturday. This is really helpful thank you
No worries. And happy belated birthday!!! :birthday::party:
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Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by A.G.G.)
No worries. And happy belated birthday!!! :birthday::party:
Thank you so much!!!!
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CosmicApathy1
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#6
Report 2 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi, I'm autistic and until recently have had no trouble stimming in front of other people. Now I keep on feeling the need to stim in lessons and I'm scared I'm distracting other people.
It's really loud in the classroom and it really affects me. Like, in music the other day the music was really loud and I needed to stim but I couldn't so it built up and built up and in the end, I asked to go to the toilet and was stimming so much I bruised all up the side of my hand. I really need to be able to mask it I'm also getting really bad sensory overload recently, I play an instrument and I can't even play it without getting sensory overload and it's really affecting me. Please someone help
**** like this is why I despise schools.
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Anonymous #1
#7
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by CosmicApathy1)
**** like this is why I despise schools.
Ye me too. I also don't feel physically able to speak today, and they're not accepting it
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