What car out of these is the best for motorway driving?

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user432
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#1
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#1
So I'm going to be driving 10 miles to and from work on the motorway.

I was going to buy a used(~£2000, ~60,000 miles):
Yaris 06-11 1.3
Fiesta 09-12 1.2 (around this version)
C1 (im not sure i've only read about it a few times)

Which one is the best for motorway driving and is reliable/cheap/won't die on me halfway through a journey.
Last edited by user432; 1 week ago
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kaizagill
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#2
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#2
yaris is better than fiesta for driving motorway
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TheMcSame
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#3
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#3
Entirely depends really

Fiesta or the Yaris would be my first ports of call. Fiestas are plentiful and have historically shared a lot of parts with other ford models (so I'd presume the same is true for this generation of Fiesta as well), so parts should be plentiful and relatively cheap. Also, Fiestas have always sold really well and, put simply, bad cars don't consistently sell well.

The Yaris on the other hand, has Toyota engineering behind it. So solid reliability, likely over-engineered (in the good Japanese way, not the horrible, tear half the car apart to get at something German way) and would also be a solid choice in its own right.

But most importantly, history needs to be looked at. Even the most reliable car on the market will have issues if it hasn't been looked after.

That being said, have you considered diesels at all? Much more enjoyable to drive at these lower horsepower/lower displacements imo.
Last edited by TheMcSame; 1 week ago
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Nuffles
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#4
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#4
None will be great on the motorway, but like the others I'd say either the Yaris or the Fiesta. They're much of the same - small cars primarily designed for city and short trip driving, although ten miles is only about ten minutes on the motorway so meh. The Fiesta miiight be a little quieter and more refined, but the Yaris will probably be more reliable long term.

Personally I'd find an old 1.6 petrol or 1.9TDI mk4 Golf. Much nicer for longer trips, cheap to insure, cheap to repair, and much nicer interiors with more room, including a much larger boot.
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the bear
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#5
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#5
it is worth considering the colour of the car. if you break down then a bright highly visible car is preferable to something which is difficult to pick out.
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Mr. Petrol Head
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#6
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#6
(Original post by user432)
So I'm going to be driving 10 miles to and from work on the motorway.

I was going to buy a used(~£2000, ~60,000 miles):
Yaris 06-11 1.3
Fiesta 09-12 1.2 (around this version)
C1 (im not sure i've only read about it a few times)

Which one is the best for motorway driving and is reliable/cheap/won't die on me halfway through a journey.
Toyota Yaris. 1.3 makes nearly 90bhp which is plenty to maintain 70mph. But if you are going for a motorway based car, you need to something bigger like a Toyota Auris or Hyundai I30.
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Mr. Petrol Head
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Nuffles)
None will be great on the motorway, but like the others I'd say either the Yaris or the Fiesta. They're much of the same - small cars primarily designed for city and short trip driving, although ten miles is only about ten minutes on the motorway so meh. The Fiesta miiight be a little quieter and more refined, but the Yaris will probably be more reliable long term.

Personally I'd find an old 1.6 petrol or 1.9TDI mk4 Golf. Much nicer for longer trips, cheap to insure, cheap to repair, and much nicer interiors with more room, including a much larger boot.
Sensible advice. Definitely something with a bigger engine should be better. More power so less burden on the engine doing 70mph.
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Nick6501
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#8
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#8
I would go with the Fiesta but i think it mainly comes down to the engine as you need quite a lot of kick on a motorway not to mention the noises, my first car was a 1.0 corsa and it was pretty awful on motorways in terms of overtaking and getting up to speed quickly as well as noise, personally think the Fiesta will be more comfortable and quiet at high speeds. I would skip a 1.0 and 1.2 and maybe go for a 1.4 or 1.6.
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Joinedup
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#9
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#9
I'd fancy the yaris for a reliable commuter car.

Driving 200 miles per day sales rep style in a small car isn't very enjoyable but OP is talking about 10 miles commute.
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Joinedup
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#10
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#10
People catastrophise driving on motorways in small cars. It's a bit less pleasant but it's not the end of the world :rolleyes:
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Mr. Petrol Head
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Joinedup)
People catastrophise driving on motorways in small cars. It's a bit less pleasant but it's not the end of the world :rolleyes:
Smaller engines a.k.a fuel mileage goes down the drain for a small 3 pot xD
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user432
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#12
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#12
(Original post by TheMcSame)
Entirely depends really

Fiesta or the Yaris would be my first ports of call. Fiestas are plentiful and have historically shared a lot of parts with other ford models (so I'd presume the same is true for this generation of Fiesta as well), so parts should be plentiful and relatively cheap. Also, Fiestas have always sold really well and, put simply, bad cars don't consistently sell well.

The Yaris on the other hand, has Toyota engineering behind it. So solid reliability, likely over-engineered (in the good Japanese way, not the horrible, tear half the car apart to get at something German way) and would also be a solid choice in its own right.

But most importantly, history needs to be looked at. Even the most reliable car on the market will have issues if it hasn't been looked after.

That being said, have you considered diesels at all? Much more enjoyable to drive at these lower horsepower/lower displacements imo.
I've heard that diesels are more expensive in the long run? So I haven't looked into it much.
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TheMcSame
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#13
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#13
(Original post by user432)
I've heard that diesels are more expensive in the long run? So I haven't looked into it much.
Depends. Generally speaking, maintaining a diesel is cheaper, however, repairs can be more costly. But on the flip side, diesels generally have fewer issues and the engine is simply better built by design because the higher compression pressures necessitate the use of cast iron as opposed to the usual aluminium alloys used for petrol engines, which makes for a stronger, more wear-resistant engine. It's also part of the reason diesels generate more torque at low RPMs

The biggest question mark is going to be the DPF. That's where a lot of costly diesel repairs come from these days, mainly because people don't allow it to carry out a regen to clean itself.
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Joinedup
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#14
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#14
I'd avoid 10+ year old diesel cars.

if anything goes wrong with the engine it's much more costly to fix it - judging by the experience of my friends and family diesels of that age are not more reliable than petrol, diesels are complicated with a lot of highly stressed components in the fuel side.
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Joinedup
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#15
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#15
(Original post by Mr. Petrol Head)
Smaller engines a.k.a fuel mileage goes down the drain for a small 3 pot xD
There's a grain of truth in that but I don't think it's actually going to be significant for the cars OP is talking about.

It's a bit of an out of date talking point from the days when cars like the 2CV were still popular, in one of those you'd literally have to constantly keep your pedal to the metal to maybe reach 60mph and running any engine flat out isn't economical even if it's a really tiny engine.
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user432
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#16
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#16
Ok so turns out I may not actually need to drive on the motorway for any of those 10 miles. If I do, it will probably be for <2 miles. Mainly be dual carriageways, A roads, normal city driving etc.
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Nuffles
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#17
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#17
(Original post by Joinedup)
I'd avoid 10+ year old diesel cars.

if anything goes wrong with the engine it's much more costly to fix it - judging by the experience of my friends and family diesels of that age are not more reliable than petrol, diesels are complicated with a lot of highly stressed components in the fuel side.
Honestly I'm totally the opposite. I wouldn't touch a modern diesel with a DPF with a bargepole. AdBlue systems are even worse.

I'll have the 15 year old plus old-school diesels please. My partners' VE110 mk4 Golf has a low pressure mechanical fuel injector pump. Injectors are cheap as chips and you can replace them without even removing the cam cover. Even for my PD130 the injectors run at a much lower pressure than modern common rail diesels so they're easy to replace. A used set of PD130 injectors is less than £100 and a full set of recon injectors is £500. Hardly earth shattering money. Injector replacement involves whipping off the cam cover, removing the cam follower, pop the old injector out (they live in a bath of engine oil so no seizing like external injectors), new injector in, cam follower back on, set follower lash, cam cover back on, job done.

PD130 turbos are cheap and common as well. If you're willing to turn a spanner old diesels are cheap and easy to work on, especially the mechanical injector pump ones. They're a bit clattery and unrefined but they're very reliable and great on fuel.

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Nuffles
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#18
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#18
(Original post by Joinedup)
People catastrophise driving on motorways in small cars. It's a bit less pleasant but it's not the end of the world :rolleyes:
Yeah it's fine, but it's just that, fine. The occasional motorway trip in a 1 litre car is no problem, but you'll get less driver fatigue and have a much more relaxed drive in a more powerful car that'll do 70mph at sub 2000rpm, compared to a 1 litre screaming along at 3500-4000rpm just to maintain 70.

OP only has a 10 minute trip on the motorway so it's a bit of a moot point, but anyone who needs to regularly spend time on the motorway would be far better suited to a larger (more comfortable and stable) and more powerful car.
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Joinedup
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Nuffles)
Honestly I'm totally the opposite. I wouldn't touch a modern diesel with a DPF with a bargepole. AdBlue systems are even worse.

I'll have the 15 year old plus old-school diesels please. My partners' VE110 mk4 Golf has a low pressure mechanical fuel injector pump. Injectors are cheap as chips and you can replace them without even removing the cam cover. Even for my PD130 the injectors run at a much lower pressure than modern common rail diesels so they're easy to replace. A used set of PD130 injectors is less than £100 and a full set of recon injectors is £500. Hardly earth shattering money. Injector replacement involves whipping off the cam cover, removing the cam follower, pop the old injector out (they live in a bath of engine oil so no seizing like external injectors), new injector in, cam follower back on, set follower lash, cam cover back on, job done.

PD130 turbos are cheap and common as well. If you're willing to turn a spanner old diesels are cheap and easy to work on, especially the mechanical injector pump ones. They're a bit clattery and unrefined but they're very reliable and great on fuel.

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Oh yeah I wasn't trying to imply that I think current generation diesels are better. I'm assuming a recent diesel isn't in the OPs crosshairs.

Iirc The yaris diesel was crdi since 2002, dunno about the Ford tbh. Course it'll depend on the actual engine but as a rule of thumb diesels since roughly the mid 2000s aren't worth it due to engine fragility and the expense of having it fixed.

Even the good old smoke and rattle diesels are a gamble today cos they'll probably start getting spanked by pollution charge zones and road tax at some point soon.
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