Dina28.
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#1
Hi, I am currently a 2nd year law student. I am looking into my options of doing either the BPC or LPC. I would like to make an informed decision and currently I already gathered all the info for LPC. I am now looking into BPC and I am a bit confused. I would like to know, just as the LPC has the training contract available where some covers the LPC cost, can a training contract cover the BPC cost as well? Also, can someone explain to me more about pupillage, if it is something that I need to secure prior to BPC, etc. In fact, any info on the BPC and the process would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
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Crazy Jamie
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#2
Report 6 months ago
#2
The first thing you need to realise (because it's not entirely clear that you do from your post) is that the LPC and BPC are for two separate career paths. You should be choosing between them based more on the career that appeals most to you rather than the courses themselves, though of course there may be other relevant factors, of which funding will be one.

The BPC is a course you need to take in order to become a barrister. You need to pass the course, and then need to secure and complete pupillage, which is a one year process where your first six months is shadowing one or more barristers, and your second six months is practising as a barrister. At the end of pupillage you will apply for tenancy with the chambers you did pupillage at, and if you're accepted you become a tenant and effectively have a permanent position at the chambers. Securing pupillage is the real bottleneck of the process; there are many more times applicants than there are pupillages, and securing pupillage is incredibly competitive. The BPC isn't a course you should do unless you both want to be a barrister and think that you stand a realistic chance of securing pupillage.

To answer your two main questions, every advertised pupillage has a pupillage award, which is split into a grant in the first six months and guaranteed earnings in the second six months. The most lucrative of those awards can be drawn down to help fund the bar course, but that is a very small minority of pupillages. It should not be a general expectation that you'll secure a pupillage prior to doing the BPC at all (only a very small minority of applicants do), let alone one of the very few pupillages that would allow you to draw down part of your grant to help to fund it. I've already answered the other question, but no, you don't need to secure pupillage before doing the BPC, and for the most part you shouldn't expect to. The important thing is that you have a realistic chance of securing pupillage. When you secure it is far harder to predict.
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The University of Law Students
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#3
Report 5 months ago
#3
(Original post by Dina28.)
Hi, I am currently a 2nd year law student. I am looking into my options of doing either the BPC or LPC. I would like to make an informed decision and currently I already gathered all the info for LPC. I am now looking into BPC and I am a bit confused. I would like to know, just as the LPC has the training contract available where some covers the LPC cost, can a training contract cover the BPC cost as well? Also, can someone explain to me more about pupillage, if it is something that I need to secure prior to BPC, etc. In fact, any info on the BPC and the process would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
Hi Dina28

Crazy Jamie has pretty much covered it above but I also find this route map handy- it shows the different routes into the different legal careers. Law Careers Net is also a good site for lots of different information on pupillages and training contracts: https://www.lawcareers.net/Starting-...l-Career-Paths

You might also find Chambers Student useful too: https://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/

Hope that helps!

Nic
Student Ambassador at The University of Law
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Dina28.
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#4
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#4
(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
The first thing you need to realise (because it's not entirely clear that you do from your post) is that the LPC and BPC are for two separate career paths. You should be choosing between them based more on the career that appeals most to you rather than the courses themselves, though of course there may be other relevant factors, of which funding will be one.

The BPC is a course you need to take in order to become a barrister. You need to pass the course, and then need to secure and complete pupillage, which is a one year process where your first six months is shadowing one or more barristers, and your second six months is practising as a barrister. At the end of pupillage you will apply for tenancy with the chambers you did pupillage at, and if you're accepted you become a tenant and effectively have a permanent position at the chambers. Securing pupillage is the real bottleneck of the process; there are many more times applicants than there are pupillages, and securing pupillage is incredibly competitive. The BPC isn't a course you should do unless you both want to be a barrister and think that you stand a realistic chance of securing pupillage.

To answer your two main questions, every advertised pupillage has a pupillage award, which is split into a grant in the first six months and guaranteed earnings in the second six months. The most lucrative of those awards can be drawn down to help fund the bar course, but that is a very small minority of pupillages. It should not be a general expectation that you'll secure a pupillage prior to doing the BPC at all (only a very small minority of applicants do), let alone one of the very few pupillages that would allow you to draw down part of your grant to help to fund it. I've already answered the other question, but no, you don't need to secure pupillage before doing the BPC, and for the most part you shouldn't expect to. The important thing is that you have a realistic chance of securing pupillage. When you secure it is far harder to predict.
Hi, thank you for your informative response. I am aware of most things you have mentioned. I am still a bit unsure of whether to pursue the BPC or LPC path. I am honestly interested in the BPC, however, after a few advisory discussions with lecturers and attending some webinars, I have become quite bit discouraged in relation to securing a pupillage.
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Blayze
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#5
Report 4 months ago
#5
(Original post by Dina28.)
Hi, thank you for your informative response. I am aware of most things you have mentioned. I am still a bit unsure of whether to pursue the BPC or LPC path. I am honestly interested in the BPC, however, after a few advisory discussions with lecturers and attending some webinars, I have become quite bit discouraged in relation to securing a pupillage.
I'm not quite sure you've grasped Crazy Jamie's point.

Neither the BPC or the LPC themselves are things that you will really be that "interested" in. Fundamentally, they are both professional courses designed for jobs - you need to be thinking about which of the roles they lead to will interest you. Both courses are pretty expensive, so you need to be sure that the jobs you will be eligible for will a) interest you and b) be a good fit for your skills so that you can get a job.

You shouldn't do either course just for something to do - if you don't stay in the legal field, in my opinion they are a waste of money. Employers outside of law don't understand what they really mean, and they don't give you many transferable skills, or count very highly as another academic qualification.
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Dina28.
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#6
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#6
(Original post by Blayze)
I'm not quite sure you've grasped Crazy Jamie's point.

Neither the BPC or the LPC themselves are things that you will really be that "interested" in. Fundamentally, they are both professional courses designed for jobs - you need to be thinking about which of the roles they lead to will interest you. Both courses are pretty expensive, so you need to be sure that the jobs you will be eligible for will a) interest you and b) be a good fit for your skills so that you can get a job.

You shouldn't do either course just for something to do - if you don't stay in the legal field, in my opinion they are a waste of money. Employers outside of law don't understand what they really mean, and they don't give you many transferable skills, or count very highly as another academic qualification.
I am sorry, I believed I phrased that wrong. I am aware that they are professional courses that are designed for two different career paths. When I made this question, I was not that knowledgeable in this topic but since then to now, I have had many talks with my lecturers at my university about this so I completely understand the two courses, the career paths they lead to. Hence, when I say I am interested in the BPC, I meant that I wanted to become a barrister. You see, in my home country, we do not have a distinction between a barrister and a solicitor, all we have is 'Attorney at Law'. So for me it does not matter whether I do the LPC or BPC, because I just need either one to become qualified in my country, therefore, I have the opportunity to chose which courses attracts me more. The BPC does that but I am aware of how challenging it is to get a pupillage hence I am a bit discouraged, thinking if I have a chance against all the UK residents that I am sure are all intelligent persons. I realized that most of UK residents who are applying for this course would have been working adults with prior degrees other than just law. For me, I am now beginning my career life, I just finished CAPE (equivalence is A-Levels) and started this law degree right after. So this is where my concern is currently.
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The University of Law Students
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#7
Report 3 months ago
#7
(Original post by Dina28.)
I am sorry, I believed I phrased that wrong. I am aware that they are professional courses that are designed for two different career paths. When I made this question, I was not that knowledgeable in this topic but since then to now, I have had many talks with my lecturers at my university about this so I completely understand the two courses, the career paths they lead to. Hence, when I say I am interested in the BPC, I meant that I wanted to become a barrister. You see, in my home country, we do not have a distinction between a barrister and a solicitor, all we have is 'Attorney at Law'. So for me it does not matter whether I do the LPC or BPC, because I just need either one to become qualified in my country, therefore, I have the opportunity to chose which courses attracts me more. The BPC does that but I am aware of how challenging it is to get a pupillage hence I am a bit discouraged, thinking if I have a chance against all the UK residents that I am sure are all intelligent persons. I realized that most of UK residents who are applying for this course would have been working adults with prior degrees other than just law. For me, I am now beginning my career life, I just finished CAPE (equivalence is A-Levels) and started this law degree right after. So this is where my concern is currently.
Hi Dina28,

You are quite right in your analysis. It is very difficult to get pupillage in UK. If you do not intend to be a barrister in the UK, then you multiple options including the SQE route (for solicitors). Here's the map again, which I encourage you to look at: https://www.lawcareers.net/Starting-...l-Career-Paths

Both the LPC and the BPC can be difficult so don't underestimate either course but there are many more traineeships available than pupillages. If you do not have a qualifying law degree already, you will not be able to complete the LPC. You will have to complete the SQE courses instead. I recommend that you have a read through this page: https://www.law.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/sqe/.

If you have any questions, feel free to come back and ask.

Hope this helps!

Nic
Student Ambassador at the University of Law
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