Adam457
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#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
Hi everyone,

I am a first year student who has been at university for 2 months now. However I really dislike my course which is making me want to drop out. I'm studying History which I thought would be interesting because I liked it at A Level, however I don't find it interesting. I don't think I want to stay 3 years at uni.

I have felt like dropping out from about 2 weeks into my course, finding the workload stressful, I have lots of coursework and reading to do and it's not what I want to do in my life. I have belief that it's making me chronically ill as I sometimes cram late in the night, getting 6 hours of sleep and often worry if I am doing enough work.

I have 2 part time jobs which I both enjoy far more than my studies. I don't wish to give these up.

I also haven't made many friends, I'm not into partying which my ex flatmates were (I moved out 3 weeks ago in the hope of finding flatmates that I would click with) but I haven't really made any friends. My coursemates are decent but I only see them once a week as my course is mostly online, so I can feel lonely some of the time.

I love living away from home but I feel uni isn't the right environment for me. I feel like I could be better off in life if I dropped out as I want to work full time so I have enough money to find somewhere else to live.

Any thoughts?
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Anonymous #1
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by Adam457)
Hi everyone,

I am a first year student who has been at university for 2 months now. However I really dislike my course which is making me want to drop out. I'm studying History which I thought would be interesting because I liked it at A Level, however I don't find it interesting. I don't think I want to stay 3 years at uni.

I have felt like dropping out from about 2 weeks into my course, finding the workload stressful, I have lots of coursework and reading to do and it's not what I want to do in my life. I have belief that it's making me chronically ill as I sometimes cram late in the night, getting 6 hours of sleep and often worry if I am doing enough work.

I have 2 part time jobs which I both enjoy far more than my studies. I don't wish to give these up.

I also haven't made many friends, I'm not into partying which my ex flatmates were (I moved out 3 weeks ago in the hope of finding flatmates that I would click with) but I haven't really made any friends. My coursemates are decent but I only see them once a week as my course is mostly online, so I can feel lonely some of the time.

I love living away from home but I feel uni isn't the right environment for me. I feel like I could be better off in life if I dropped out as I want to work full time so I have enough money to find somewhere else to live.

Any thoughts?
This is a tricky situation and I completely sympathise with you in that.

I think we can often build things up in our heads to be perfect and when they're not quite what we expected, we feel let down. If university was something you were really looking forward to, it might be that the reality just isn't what you expected or hoped for. It has only been two months and things could really look up. Maybe try and get involved in a couple of clubs or societies? That might help you find friends with similar interests - or try something new, you might surprise yourself!

As for the workload, it was always going to be a bit of a jump up from A Level and once again, that takes adjustment. It shouldn't come at the cost of your physical or mental wellbeing though. It is okay to prioritise getting a good nights sleep over doing course reading sometimes. Don't put too much pressure on yourself. It is only first year - it's about discovering yourself and what you enjoy! Whilst it's important to try your best, first year is not the be-all and end-all of your degree. It's important to have a balance between your mental/physical health, your social life and your studies - though I recognise this is difficult to figure out (it will just take time and trial and error - that's natural)

I have many friends who felt like they were floundering and alone their first year of uni and they now love it! Chances are you're not alone with how you feel at the moment. Remember that this is brand new for everyone! You could maybe get in touch with the uni's guidance service and ask for some advice - they are there to help! Or possibly have a chat with your family, be honest and see what they think.

If it's the degree that you really dislike then maybe consider transferring to another course if there's something else which has always interested you. There may be something out there you love but never considered as an option for studying! My friend transferred during her degree to a different subject and it was absolutely the right decision for her. However, it might be worth pursuing history for a while longer till you're more certain.

Another of my friends chose to study his degree on a whim because he had no clue what he wanted to study during sixth form, a few months into the course he hated it, dropped out and took a gap year. He reapplied for a rather different degree the year after and ended up loving it!

There is no one right answer. Maybe uni isn't for you and it would indeed suit you best to go straight into the world of work.

At the end of the day, only you know how you truly feel so you need to make the decision that is right for you.

Hope this helped a bit
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gjd800
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#3
Report 1 week ago
#3
From what you've written, it sounds to me like the work is a culture shock and rather than addressing that culture shock you want to bin it off completely. See this every year without fail, and it is understandable. But you can make practical changes to ease the burden and it'd likely help. Working 2 jobs whilst doing a history degree is a recipe for disaster from the off. Reading for a history degree involves a great deal, and other commitments are bound to get in the way and make life difficult.

With that said, if I'm not getting that right and you genuinely aren't arsed about the course for reasons other than 'oh **** this is more work than I expected', then you should talk to your course lead and academic advisor about the withdrawal process. Sometimes working out what you don't want to do is as important as working out what you do want to do.
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#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
(Original post by gjd800)
From what you've written, it sounds to me like the work is a culture shock and rather than addressing that culture shock you want to bin it off completely. See this every year without fail, and it is understandable. But you can make practical changes to ease the burden and it'd likely help. Working 2 jobs whilst doing a history degree is a recipe for disaster from the off. Reading for a history degree involves a great deal, and other commitments are bound to get in the way and make life difficult.

With that said, if I'm not getting that right and you genuinely aren't arsed about the course for reasons other than 'oh **** this is more work than I expected', then you should talk to your course lead and academic advisor about the withdrawal process. Sometimes working out what you don't want to do is as important as working out what you do want to do.
I agree that working two jobs alongside your degree is not the best plan - that may be partly why it feels like too much work. Perhaps consider quitting at least one.
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Adam457
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#5
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#5
(Original post by gjd800)
From what you've written, it sounds to me like the work is a culture shock and rather than addressing that culture shock you want to bin it off completely. See this every year without fail, and it is understandable. But you can make practical changes to ease the burden and it'd likely help. Working 2 jobs whilst doing a history degree is a recipe for disaster from the off. Reading for a history degree involves a great deal, and other commitments are bound to get in the way and make life difficult.

With that said, if I'm not getting that right and you genuinely aren't arsed about the course for reasons other than 'oh **** this is more work than I expected', then you should talk to your course lead and academic advisor about the withdrawal process. Sometimes working out what you don't want to do is as important as working out what you do want to do.
Fair enough but I enjoy my jobs way more than my studies, and I need the money to pay off my student debt (that's if I do continue, like at the moment the student debt isn't too much)
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gjd800
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#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
(Original post by Adam457)
Fair enough but I enjoy my jobs way more than my studies, and I need the money to pay off my student debt (that's if I do continue, like at the moment the student debt isn't too much)
You don't need to pay jt off now, however. Enjoying it more, I sort of get. But I wonder if that is largely because you're just finding it hard and, with all other things being equal, you'd get on with the course if you had a little less on your plate. But this is my work head, and like I always tell my lot - only you really know, and you really have to trust your gut in the end,
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Adam457
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#7
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by gjd800)
You don't need to pay jt off now, however. Enjoying it more, I sort of get. But I wonder if that is largely because you're just finding it hard and, with all other things being equal, you'd get on with the course if you had a little less on your plate. But this is my work head, and like I always tell my lot - only you really know, and you really have to trust your gut in the end,
Tbh I do find it hard but also I feel like I chose the wrong degree, so I may be better off quitting anyway. It's just that when I was in Y13 I felt like I didn't know what I wanted to do in my life so I chose one of my A Level subjects to study at uni, found myself to be not doing the reading each week, hardly have the motivation to watch lectures/attend seminars now.
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gjd800
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#8
Report 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by Adam457)
Tbh I do find it hard but also I feel like I chose the wrong degree, so I may be better off quitting anyway. It's just that when I was in Y13 I felt like I didn't know what I wanted to do in my life so I chose one of my A Level subjects to study at uni, found myself to be not doing the reading each week, hardly have the motivation to watch lectures/attend seminars now.
With all this being the case, it does sound like you might be better withdrawing. I made the wrong choice at 17 when applying, so I do get it.
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