Which subject is more mathematical chemistry or biology?

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KMD123
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#1
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Which has more maths at a level and uni ?

What kind of maths do the two subjects involve?

Which subject is generally harder ?
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flamingolover
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I would say chemistry is more maths based than biology is. It's why I struggled at a levels with it. Bio is mainly just a few types of statistics but there is a wider range of maths in chemistry.

I would say bio is hard due to how much content there is to learn so if you can learn facts easily then bio might be easier
Chemistry is a mix of facts to learn and theory which is why I found it really hard

Which one you find the hardest really depends on you.
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t0897
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(Original post by KMD123)
Which has more maths at a level and uni ?

What kind of maths do the two subjects involve?

Which subject is generally harder ?
chemistry has more maths but practising makes it easy so it's easy marks
whereas biology has maths where I personally struggle to get the marks for
overall bio is harder it feels you're always behind on content
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franksfoot1
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A-Level chemistry has more maths. Especially in year 2. Like said above, there's only so much they can ask you to do, so once you get the hang of it, it's easy marks.

With biology you will be asked to calculate percentage increase and there's a fair amount of stats (standard deviation and other stuff). However, there's less maths content in biology.

The maths content in both is alright if you already do A-Level maths, although it depends on how good you are with statistics (for biology).

Overall I find biology the harder subject as there's a lot of content! You have to remember a lot, and apply it to a lot! Whereas, I find with chemistry there's more concepts to understand, but much less you just have to know without a full reason why it's happening. For me, understanding why something happens, means I'm more likely to remember it!

Biology exam questions and mark schemes can be mean too
Last edited by franksfoot1; 1 month ago
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by KMD123)
Which has more maths at a level and uni ?

What kind of maths do the two subjects involve?

Which subject is generally harder ?
Chemistry definitely has more maths than biology.

As for which subject is harder, biology has a lot more content and more rote learning, whereas chemistry is probably more intellectually demanding and requires a good understanding of the fundamental principles. It depends what type of learner you are, I personally found chemistry easier as once I had grasped the fundamentals, you can often work stuff out without just memorising.
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KMD123
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I have not done a level math, will I be ok ?
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artful_lounger
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At uni chemistry is definitely much more mathematical and if you haven't done A-level Maths you will usually take a specific module in mathematical methods you need from A-level for a chemistry degree, and everyone will likely also be introduced to complex numbers and matrices (which at A-level are FM topics). These topics are fundamental to physical chemistry which you will cover in all chemistry degrees to a fairly large extent.

For biology it's certainly quantitative and you'll been to be able to think quantitatively and do some basic maths and stats (a bit more than that I'm biochemistry but most other bioscience fields don't require the same extent as biochemistry). This is because it is a science field and all sciences at degree level are necessarily mathematical. However A-level maths is usually not required and for a lot of bioscience degrees would cover more than you needed (although that's not a bad thing).

Bear in mind the division of maths and the sciences at A-level is entirely artificial - it would be like dividing reading and writing from a language subject into separate A-levels. Mathematical tools and quantitative reasoning are wholly integrated into the fundamental nature of scientific enquiry. So while A-level maths may not be specifically required you do need to have a general aptitude and enthusiasm for working quantitatively and mathematically for ANY science subject at uni, to get the most from it.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 month ago
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