Optometry or audiology

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UmamaQ
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 days ago
#1
Hi I was wondering in terms of courses is audiology or optometry better? Like I’m deciding between the two , I can’t tell like I know optometry has a better pay but in terms of uni whats it like.I am fine with coursework but exams stress me out and would the exams be as the yer goes on or at the end of the year? And which course is easier like I would say I’m an average student do u have to be super clever to do them.
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Satori Tendō
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#2
Report 6 days ago
#2
I know people who have done both
Uni's courses are different so if you have any uni in mind you'd have to check the details about them so my experience might vary but:
At Uni there is a lot of coursework throughout the year and both courses also have exams. Usually exams occur at the end of a semester at Uni, typically 2 times. You can't escape the exams. Both have practical assessments too, which seems to stress people out more than the written
I can't say which is easier, the content is too different to compare. I can say that based on what I've seen optometry is more physics/mathematics based and Audiology is heavier on biology. Again you can easily find what modules are taught at any University on their websites. If you're 'average', you can do it. If you work hard, it's all doable.

In terms of lectures, both courses tend to have a lot of lab work so you'll have a healthy balance of classroom and real life practice (optometry tool kits seem to be super expensive in comparison to audiology, nothing a maintenance loan can't cover though). Some courses have fully integrated placements meaning you wouldn't need a pre-reg year once you graduate. My Audiologist friends had that so they were able to have their full license as soon as they graduated.
But you'll see real patients on your time at both courses regardless of how long.
In terms of pay you can get quite a lot with both fields in the private industry but Optometrists tend to make more on average. The demand for Audiologists are higher even in highly populated areas you can easily find a job (if you go to remote areas, there are places desperate enough to offer higher than average salaries for graduates). But then again, job prospects are still good for Optometry too.
Another interesting thing is global charity work. I talked with an Audiologist who was chosen to go abroad with Sonova Hear the world foundation and was able to set up hearing aids for children in Africa. It was a cool story.

The patient population is quite different for the two. Optometrists regularly see a variety of ages whereas audiologists tend to have mostly an older population (although hearing loss is starting to occur early now with technology) or specialising in children (My friend talked about how she managed to assist in switching on an aids for babies for the first time, they will always cry though it's mostly the parents who laugh). Optometrists can also go down various routes specialising in specific eye conditions like diabetes or glaucoma, when I visited a diabetes department in a hospital I was able to shadow the optometrist who was part of the team.

I know some audiologists and optometrists who are mobile too! So they have their testing kits in a little portable case and drive around to different houses. Search up The Outside Clinic. A cool option if you like to be on the road, they earn a good amount too.

Another big difference is that Audiology seems to be a lot more tech focused, tinkering with softwares to tailor the sound, hearing aids are essentially tiny computers, linking with apps. Hearing tests and eye tests (which will be something you'll do everyday) are also very different, look up some videos.
When an aid stops working or acts weird it isn't always because of physical trauma like broken glasses, you'll need to connect and troubleshoot the device etc... problem solving is a lot more tech focused. You'll also need to be passionate about keeping up to date with all the hearing aid updates which happen a lot, new models, designs what has been discontinued? What support devices can a patient have with their hearing aid? This could sound cool and interesting or meddlesome depending on what you like.

I think it all comes down to, what will you want to do day to day? I think you need to visit some open days and ask questions to the professionals who live their life doing these things. Also look up videos posted by various NHS trusts on Youtube. Try asking, calling, emailing audiologists and optometrists so that you can shadow them for a day.
Last edited by Satori Tendō; 6 days ago
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UmamaQ
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#3
Report Thread starter 6 days ago
#3
(Original post by Satori Tendō)
I know people who have done both
Uni's courses are different so if you have any uni in mind you'd have to check the details about them so my experience might vary but:
At Uni there is a lot of coursework throughout the year and both courses also have exams. Usually exams occur at the end of a semester at Uni, typically 2 times. You can't escape the exams. Both have practical assessments too, which seems to stress people out more than the written
I can't say which is easier, the content is too different to compare. I can say that based on what I've seen optometry is more physics/mathematics based and Audiology is heavier on biology. Again you can easily find what modules are taught at any University on their websites. If you're 'average', you can do it. If you work hard, it's all doable.

In terms of lectures, both courses tend to have a lot of lab work so you'll have a healthy balance of classroom and real life practice (optometry tool kits seem to be super expensive in comparison to audiology, nothing a maintenance loan can't cover though). Some courses have fully integrated placements meaning you wouldn't need a pre-reg year once you graduate. My Audiologist friends had that so they were able to have their full license as soon as they graduated.
But you'll see real patients on your time at both courses regardless of how long.
In terms of pay you can get quite a lot with both fields in the private industry but Optometrists tend to make more on average. The demand for Audiologists are higher even in highly populated areas you can easily find a job (if you go to remote areas, there are places desperate enough to offer higher than average salaries for graduates). But then again, job prospects are still good for Optometry too.
Another interesting thing is global charity work. I talked with an Audiologist who was chosen to go abroad with Sonova Hear the world foundation and was able to set up hearing aids for children in Africa. It was a cool story.

The patient population is quite different for the two. Optometrists regularly see a variety of ages whereas audiologists tend to have mostly an older population (although hearing loss is starting to occur early now with technology) or specialising in children (My friend talked about how she managed to assist in switching on an aids for babies for the first time, they will always cry though it's mostly the parents who laugh). Optometrists can also go down various routes specialising in specific eye conditions like diabetes or glaucoma, when I visited a diabetes department in a hospital I was able to shadow the optometrist who was part of the team.

I know some audiologists and optometrists who are mobile too! So they have their testing kits in a little portable case and drive around to different houses. Search up The Outside Clinic. A cool option if you like to be on the road, they earn a good amount too.

Another big difference is that Audiology seems to be a lot more tech focused, tinkering with softwares to tailor the sound, hearing aids are essentially tiny computers, linking with apps. Hearing tests and eye tests (which will be something you'll do everyday) are also very different, look up some videos.
When an aid stops working or acts weird it isn't always because of physical trauma like broken glasses, you'll need to connect and troubleshoot the device etc... problem solving is a lot more tech focused. You'll also need to be passionate about keeping up to date with all the hearing aid updates which happen a lot, new models, designs what has been discontinued? What support devices can a patient have with their hearing aid? This could sound cool and interesting or meddlesome depending on what you like.

I think it all comes down to, what will you want to do day to day? I think you need to visit some open days and ask questions to the professionals who live their life doing these things. Also look up videos posted by various NHS trusts on Youtube. Try asking, calling, emailing audiologists and optometrists so that you can shadow them for a day.
Ooo thank you so much for this I truly appreciate it I understand what you mean.
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UmamaQ
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#4
Report Thread starter 6 days ago
#4
Thank you so much I think audiology is the way to go for me , the way you explained it made so much sense. Thank you!!!!
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kaizagill
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#5
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#5
I prefer audiology
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Deepisingh
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#6
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#6
Optometry
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