Is it bad to leave a job after only 6 months?

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Anonymous #1
#1
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So I've been working part time at a job I hate for nearly 6 months and I find it too stressful. I only work 16 hours a week but I still really hate going to my two shifts. I want to leave and focus on my studies since I'm in my final year of uni. However, 16 hours is easily manageable since I'm only in uni 3 days a week, it's just the actual job which I hate so much! I'm only doing it for the experience since I have nothing on my CV but I'm worried if 6 months is too short and would leave a huge gap on my CV. I'm also really scared to approach my manager and say I want to quit.
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Anonymous #2
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Have you tried to look for other jobs in the meantime?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Have you tried to look for other jobs in the meantime?
Nope, tbh I don't want to work atm. I wanna focus on my studies and look for a job afterwards
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martin7
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#4
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(Original post by Anonymous)
So I've been working part time at a job I hate for nearly 6 months and I find it too stressful. I only work 16 hours a week but I still really hate going to my two shifts. I want to leave and focus on my studies since I'm in my final year of uni. However, 16 hours is easily manageable since I'm only in uni 3 days a week, it's just the actual job which I hate so much! I'm only doing it for the experience since I have nothing on my CV but I'm worried if 6 months is too short and would leave a huge gap on my CV. I'm also really scared to approach my manager and say I want to quit.
You're a university student -- that's what's accounting for the time on your CV. There's no gap -- future employers won't expect to see employment on your CV as well as your time studying. And no one is going to be surprised if a final year university student gives up a part-time job to concentrate on their studies.

Why are you scared to approach your manager? If you've decided to leave your job, that's your decision to make. The phrasing of "I'm scared to approach my manager and say I want to quit" almost sounds like you're asking permission -- you're not, you're informing them of a decision you've made. (Your contract will almost certainly require your notice to be in writing, by the way, just telling your manager verbally isn't enough.)
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by martin7)
You're a university student -- that's what's accounting for the time on your CV. There's no gap -- future employers won't expect to see employment on your CV as well as your time studying. And no one is going to be surprised if a final year university student gives up a part-time job to concentrate on their studies.

Why are you scared to approach your manager? If you've decided to leave your job, that's your decision to make. The phrasing of "I'm scared to approach my manager and say I want to quit" almost sounds like you're asking permission -- you're not, you're informing them of a decision you've made. (Your contract will almost certainly require your notice to be in writing, by the way, just telling your manager verbally isn't enough.)
Thank you for that comment. It makes me feel much better to quit now, I just needed some reassurance that's all! I have really bad anxiety and struggle to make decisions because I always agonise about everything.
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Surnia
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#6
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Seriously? You have nothing on your CV? What have you been doing? Were there no opportunities before at uni or school, like clubs and societies? Uniformed organisations? Charity events or volunteering?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Surnia)
Seriously? You have nothing on your CV? What have you been doing? Were there no opportunities before at uni or school, like clubs and societies? Uniformed organisations? Charity events or volunteering?
I never took part in extra-curricular activities because I was just completely lazy, I just focused solely on my education and yes I really do regret it now. I've done volunteering at charity shops over a few summers and that's all. I would have kept this part time job but It's really stressing me out and I hate it with a passion so I feel like I need to quit before it affects my uni work. I will try to work on my CV in the summer after I graduate.
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Surnia
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#8
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I never took part in extra-curricular activities because I was just completely lazy, I just focused solely on my education and yes I really do regret it now. I've done volunteering at charity shops over a few summers and that's all. I would have kept this part time job but It's really stressing me out and I hate it with a passion so I feel like I need to quit before it affects my uni work. I will try to work on my CV in the summer after I graduate.
I agree your studies are important at this stage. Six months of a job and some volunteering may have given you skills that could relevant, but there are gaps on your CV anyway so it's probably not going to make much difference if you stop. Unfortunately, you'll be up against people with far more experience, even if you start something next summer.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Surnia)
I agree your studies are important at this stage. Six months of a job and some volunteering may have given you skills that could relevant, but there are gaps on your CV anyway so it's probably not going to make much difference if you stop. Unfortunately, you'll be up against people with far more experience, even if you start something next summer.
I tried to get a job or some kind of experience last year but it was incredibly difficult due to covid. So when I quit my job I'm going to try and get more involved with uni life in the last 6 months I have left there.
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Mikkio
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#10
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(Original post by Anonymous)
So I've been working part time at a job I hate for nearly 6 months and I find it too stressful. I only work 16 hours a week but I still really hate going to my two shifts. I want to leave and focus on my studies since I'm in my final year of uni. However, 16 hours is easily manageable since I'm only in uni 3 days a week, it's just the actual job which I hate so much! I'm only doing it for the experience since I have nothing on my CV but I'm worried if 6 months is too short and would leave a huge gap on my CV. I'm also really scared to approach my manager and say I want to quit.
don't worry about it - gaps in CVs can creatvely be explained in positive ways - just make up something which sounds good which explains why you might have quit after like some hobby or procject / going abroad etc
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Mikkio)
don't worry about it - gaps in CVs can creatvely be explained in positive ways - just make up something which sounds good which explains why you might have quit after like some hobby or procject / going abroad etc
Yeah, I'm just going to explain that it was my final year of university so I had a dissertation to work on
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Mikkio
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yeah, I'm just going to explain that it was my final year of university so I had a dissertation to work on
tbh no one will probably ask but yeah if they do then thats a reasonable answer
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Surnia
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(Original post by Mikkio)
don't worry about it - gaps in CVs can creatvely be explained in positive ways - just make up something which sounds good which explains why you might have quit after like some hobby or procject / going abroad etc
It's illegal to lie on a CV.
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Surnia
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#14
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I tried to get a job or some kind of experience last year but it was incredibly difficult due to covid. So when I quit my job I'm going to try and get more involved with uni life in the last 6 months I have left there.
You don't have to have employment on your CV, but you've (potentially) had years to get involved with extra-curriculars. I never had a job until I started my chosen career after graduation. However, I was trusted and helping with school fetes and jumbles sales and charity fundraising from being young, so already notching up cash handling and customer service. Joined Air Cadets, did sports clubs and societies at uni, plus other volunteering. Unfortunately you are paying the price for being lazy, so choose your subsequent activities carefully and get something relevant where you can develop the right skills.
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art2write
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#15
Leaving a job after six months may signal a red flag to potential employers who view your resume or job application. According to CNBC, leaving an entry-level job after six months is less of an issue to an employer than quitting a higher-level job in the organization that takes more time and effort to fill.
You can start by stating your reason for leaving, follow with some kind words about the employer, and frame the situation in a positive way so that your impression will not be negative on employer. Next time when you apply for a job, keep your CV well prepared.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by art2write)
Leaving a job after six months may signal a red flag to potential employers who view your resume or job application. According to CNBC, leaving an entry-level job after six months is less of an issue to an employer than quitting a higher-level job in the organization that takes more time and effort to fill.
You can start by stating your reason for leaving, follow with some kind words about the employer, and frame the situation in a positive way so that your impression will not be negative on employer. Next time when you apply for a job, keep your CV well prepared.
I work as a Stockroom Associate at Zara, I think this is an entry-level job since there seems to be a high turnover of staff. Surely education is a reasonable enough reason to leave. I can easily handle the balance since it's only 16 hours a week but I just really hate the job and seems like I have a good excuse to leave since I'm still a student.
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martin7
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(Original post by art2write)
Leaving a job after six months may signal a red flag to potential employers who view your resume or job application. According to CNBC, leaving an entry-level job after six months is less of an issue to an employer than quitting a higher-level job in the organization that takes more time and effort to fill.
You can start by stating your reason for leaving, follow with some kind words about the employer, and frame the situation in a positive way so that your impression will not be negative on employer. Next time when you apply for a job, keep your CV well prepared.
The six month thing is only really going to be relevant for full-time jobs once someone has completed their education. No one is going to draw adverse inferences from a final-year student leaving a part-time job after a few months with the reason for leaving being "I want to concentrate on my studies."
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gjd800
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#18
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#18
Not at all.

I've left jobs after fewer than 6 hours, ha
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