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How hard is it to get into UCL/LSE for economics.

Hi,
I am applying for UCL LSE Warwick and Manchester for econ.
i just wanted to know whether or not i should be safe in expecting a place as i have no safer options.
i am currently predicted 3A*s (Maths, physics and computer science) with 6 A*s 3 As 2 Bs in GCSE. I havent done any epq nor extra curricular stuff other than atheltics.
shoudl i go for a safer option or stick with these unis?
Original post by uniprospect121
Hi,
I am applying for UCL LSE Warwick and Manchester for econ.
i just wanted to know whether or not i should be safe in expecting a place as i have no safer options.
i am currently predicted 3A*s (Maths, physics and computer science) with 6 A*s 3 As 2 Bs in GCSE. I havent done any epq nor extra curricular stuff other than atheltics.
shoudl i go for a safer option or stick with these unis?

Very competitive course at all of those. You have to assume that everyone applying has a similar academic profile.

What are your other two choices? (and typical offers for each)
Without A-level Further Maths your odds are extremely low for LSE/UCL/Warwick (almost nonexistent for LSE). unless your school didn't offer further maths (in which case your referee should clearly explain this on your reference).

Perhaps you could chance one of Warwick or UCL, but I wouldn't suggest bothering to apply to LSE without FM just with how competitive the course is. I believe in recent years something like 90% or more of successful applicants for LSE single honours economics have FM (although many do apply without FM, they are much less successful in getting an offer and/or achieving it).

Manchester is probably fine, I've never heard that they're especially difficult to get into for economics or have unusually high entry criteria/a need for FM etc.
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by Admit-One
Very competitive course at all of those. You have to assume that everyone applying has a similar academic profile.

What are your other two choices? (and typical offers for each)

going with Maths and finance at Manchester for my 5th option. initially wanted to do maths and UCL but they require FM.
Original post by artful_lounger
Without A-level Further Maths your odds are extremely low for LSE/UCL/Warwick (almost nonexistent for LSE). unless your school didn't offer further maths (in which case your referee should clearly explain this on your reference).

Perhaps you could chance one of Warwick or UCL, but I wouldn't suggest bothering to apply to LSE without FM just with how competitive the course is. I believe in recent years something like 90% or more of successful applicants for LSE single honours economics have FM (although many do apply without FM, they are much less successful in getting an offer and/or achieving it).

Manchester is probably fine, I've never heard that they're especially difficult to get into for economics or have unusually high entry criteria/a need for FM etc.

Ive heard of how hard it is to get into LSE, but even UCL and warwick?
if so any recommendations of where i should apply for instead of LSE
Manchester definitely, UCL and Warwick maybe, LSE no way unless your school doesn’t offer FM.

With those predictions any uni that isn’t oxbridge, UCL, LSE or Warwick will almost definitely give you an offer. If your school offers FM, don’t bother with LSE and go with like notts or bath or something
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by uniprospect121
Ive heard of how hard it is to get into LSE, but even UCL and warwick?
if so any recommendations of where i should apply for instead of LSE


It's really just the nature of their degrees, which are extremely mathematical so they preferentially take people with A-level FM I gather. UCL might have more of a mix, but I think Warwick (along with LSE and Cambridge) do have a marked preference for those with FM.

Outside of those unis, Nottingham is I believe fairly good for economics, as is Bristol I think. Bristol may also refer FM but I don't think to the same extent as the others. Edinburgh might be a consideration also.

Spoiler

Original post by artful_lounger
It's really just the nature of their degrees, which are extremely mathematical so they preferentially take people with A-level FM I gather. UCL might have more of a mix, but I think Warwick (along with LSE and Cambridge) do have a marked preference for those with FM.

Outside of those unis, Nottingham is I believe fairly good for economics, as is Bristol I think. Bristol may also refer FM but I don't think to the same extent as the others. Edinburgh might be a consideration also.

Spoiler



I looked into it and found management and finance similar to economics(would do any degree which involves business with maths) .Would these courses have a higher chance of being accepted into or is it still the same at LSE.
Original post by uniprospect121
I looked into it and found management and finance similar to economics(would do any degree which involves business with maths) .Would these courses have a higher chance of being accepted into or is it still the same at LSE.

Probably the same at LSE, preferring FM. Accounting & finance may be less fussed about FM although it's very competitive I believe anyway.

The joint courses that are less focused in FM are things like PPE (and politics & Econ/Phil & Econ), Econ and economic history or economic history with econ (but probably not economics with economic history), geography with economics, etc. Some of these are also less competitive (but some not so much).
Reply 9
Can someone answer this:

If I did not get in to LSE for Economics but I got the decision fairly late (April) does that mean my application was competitive/ I was close?
Original post by lesgo21
Can someone answer this:

If I did not get in to LSE for Economics but I got the decision fairly late (April) does that mean my application was competitive/ I was close?

It means you likely were above whatever their auto rejection criteria were, but it doesn't really tell you anything about where you sat in the applicant pool. You might presume that you were stronger than someone that heard back earlier, but it would be a presumption because you don't know when either application was scored. (Lots of moving parts with admissions.)

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