Blue_Bunny
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#1
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I'm a Y11 student and struggle immensely with German Grammar, I honestly don't know a single rule. How do I know what is make or female or when to put an umlaut or the word order of a sentence? Any links to websites or revision books would be greatly appreciated (I'm on the AQA spec). I'm predicted a 7, which isn't too bad but really I want a minimum 8 and I know its my writing letting me down, so any advice?
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maddy1809
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There is no way of knowing whether a noun is feminine, masculine or neutral - you just have to learn it unfortunately.
Some words always have umlauts, some get umlauts in their plural form, but again it depends what word you are looking at.
Word order can be quite complicated - I might be able to help if you give a specific example. (I'm not fluent, but I can remember the basic grammar rules)
I did AQA at GCSE and found the CPG book helpful
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Blue_Bunny
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Word order confuses me because I've heard my teacher ' weil send the verb to the end' but also ' verb is the second idea', so which rules is more 'important'? and where I put words such as ist because to me there seems no continuity between the rulings. If you don't mind me asking, what did you get at GCSE and what would you say was your best revision resource/method? Also, which CGP book should I get?
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maddy1809
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There are words like 'weil' that send the verb to the end, for example:
Ich werde schwimmen gehen, weil es unterhaltsham ist. (I am going to go swimming because it is entertaining.)
Other connectives do the same thing - there will be a list on google somewhere. However, some don't change the word order at all such as 'und' and 'aber':
Ich werde schwimmen gehen, aber ich denke dass es langweilig ist. (I am going to go swimming but I think that it is boring.)
'aber' does not affect the word order as 'denke' is still second place, however the connective 'dass' sends the verb 'ist' to the end.
The 'Ich denke dass (thing) (adjective) (verb - e.g. 'ist')' is a useful one to remember for expressing an opinion.
Learning which connectives change the order can be a bit annoying, but once you've practiced it a bit you shouldn't find it too tricky.

At GCSE I got 9s in my mocks in Y11 and was given a 9 overall but I didn't sit the actual thing because I finished Y11 in 2020.
I found past papers really useful, especially for reading and writing. The CPG revision guide I had was really useful because it had lots of practice questions. For learning vocab I used quizlet for everything - in the back of revision guides there's often a list of loads of vocab - I just transferred a lot of this to quizlet and practised it regularly. The textbook I had was the GCSE German AQA complete revision and practice guide.
Hope this helps
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Blue_Bunny
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#5
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(Original post by maddy1809)
There are words like 'weil' that send the verb to the end, for example:
Ich werde schwimmen gehen, weil es unterhaltsham ist. (I am going to go swimming because it is entertaining.)
Other connectives do the same thing - there will be a list on google somewhere. However, some don't change the word order at all such as 'und' and 'aber':
Ich werde schwimmen gehen, aber ich denke dass es langweilig ist. (I am going to go swimming but I think that it is boring.)
'aber' does not affect the word order as 'denke' is still second place, however the connective 'dass' sends the verb 'ist' to the end.
The 'Ich denke dass (thing) (adjective) (verb - e.g. 'ist')' is a useful one to remember for expressing an opinion.
Learning which connectives change the order can be a bit annoying, but once you've practiced it a bit you shouldn't find it too tricky.

At GCSE I got 9s in my mocks in Y11 and was given a 9 overall but I didn't sit the actual thing because I finished Y11 in 2020.
I found past papers really useful, especially for reading and writing. The CPG revision guide I had was really useful because it had lots of practice questions. For learning vocab I used quizlet for everything - in the back of revision guides there's often a list of loads of vocab - I just transferred a lot of this to quizlet and practised it regularly. The textbook I had was the GCSE German AQA complete revision and practice guide.
Hope this helps
Thank for teaching me some rules I've been struggling with for 5 years and I will certainly be looking into purchasing the CGP book. Would you mind sharing your German Quizlet sets? I wanted to type up my vocab but I think it would take too long so was hoping if I could find organised AQA flashcards pre-made.
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ahws2022
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#6
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(Original post by Blue_Bunny)
I'm a Y11 student and struggle immensely with German Grammar, I honestly don't know a single rule. How do I know what is make or female or when to put an umlaut or the word order of a sentence? Any links to websites or revision books would be greatly appreciated (I'm on the AQA spec). I'm predicted a 7, which isn't too bad but really I want a minimum 8 and I know its my writing letting me down, so any advice?
Moin moin, A Level German here!
There are actually lots of rules for working out the gender of a word in German. Most words are going to be feminine but you can't really just chance it with 'die' all the time.
FEMININE:
> for nouns that are for females (e.g. die Schauspielerin)
> German Rivers (e.g. die Elbe)
> words with the following endings: -ei, -schaft, -lung, -enz, -heit, -keit, -ion, -tät, -ik, -ie, -ur
- e.g. die Wissenschaft, die Handlung, die Konsequenz, die Kindheit, die Zärtlichkeit, die Grammatik, etc.
MASCULINE:
> male nouns (e.g. der Arzt, der Metzger)
> the seasons (e.g. der Herbst)
> the days of the week and the months (e.g. der Montag, der Juni)
> words ending in the following: -ling, -us, -ig, -ant, -ich
- e.g. der Flüchtling, der Kommunismus
NEUTER:
> letters (e.g. das A, das B, das C, etc.)
> words derived from verbs end in '-en' (e.g. das Leben, das Schwimmen)
> collective nouns starting with 'Ge-' (e.g. das Gemeinde)
> words ending in the following: -lein, -chen, -ma, -um, -ment
- e.g. das Hundchen, das Instrument, das Raum, etc.

WORD ORDER:
I've been taking German for 6 years and this is the thing that I will never stop hating. German is very specific with word order in that it will follow these rules:
> verb will always come second unless followed by a subordinating conjunction such as weil, als, als ob, bevor, bis, etc.
- even if the time phrase is first, the verb follows it and then the subject (whoever is carrying out the verb). For example: Am Montag habe ich eine Prüfung OR ich habe am Montag eine Prüfung
> Time Manner Place (TMP) = sometimes Time Manner Place Object
- this means that the time phrase comes first, any thing else next and then the place it is happening
- ich werde am Montag mit meiner Freunden in London treffen
> when it comes to subordinating conjunctions, it gets a little bit more complicated and this is where I still screw up
- if I want to say something like 'I like AnnenMayKantereit (AMK) because their songs are great' the word order stays the same in English. But in german after a subordinating conjunction (you can look up a full list of them with meanings on Google) they have to do a few things
- ich mag AnnenMayKantereit + weil + ihre Lieder sind toll
1. we need to put each section of the sentence together so we have: ich mag AMK weil ihre Lieder sind toll. However this is grammatically incorrect in German so we need to...
2. add a comma before the subordinating conjunction, in this case 'weil': ich may AMK, weil ihre Lieder sind toll. This is STILL ungrammtical though
3. now we need to send the verb in the clause that contains the conjuction TO THE END OF THE SENTENCE (this is the only time verbs are not second, except for past participles or when you are using modal verbs, future tense or anything that requires an auxilliary verb)
- now we have a fully grammatical sentence of: ich mag AMK, weil ihre Lieder toll sind.
UMLAUTS:
I'm not sure what you mean about where to put umlauts. Do you mean for sound changes in verbs or in plurals? Most of the time you just have to learn where they go as they're a part of spelling but there are rules for verbs and plurals. Let me know if you need that!
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I hope this helps you. I did AQA but I never got to sit the actual paper. Some of my classmates did Edexcel from what I take AQA is more focused on grammar than Edexcel. Let me know if you need anything else. I'd suggest this site for grammar (https://www.nthuleen.com/teach/grammar.html) but we used it for bridging work between GCSE and A Level and its mostly year 12 grammar which you don't actually need for GCSE. There might be some basic pieces that could be helpful but BBC Bitesize has good explanations and the revision guides are helpful. I got an 8 at GCSE (currently at an A at A Level with an A* prediction) but I always did little to no revision so for the actual exam I'd have probably got a 9 if I'd revised. I still don't do much revision for German so please don't copy my bad habits :/

Let me know if this is helpful and if you need anything else explained! (So sorry for the length of this, I teach a year 8 that hasn't done German before so I jumped at the chance to explain something more complex🤣)
Vielen Glück!
A
Last edited by ahws2022; 5 months ago
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Krokodilo
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#7
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A) Subordinate clauses = clauses depending on a main clause or another subordinate clause to have a purpose.

• The conjugated verb form always is the very last word of the clause.
• In two-verb constructions: the infinite verb form, or the past participle, comes before it. So this applies to present perfect, past perfect, future tense, passive voice, subjunctive construction with "würden/hätten+infinitive". (However, the negation word nicht ='not' can stand in-between...) And of course clauses with modal verb: können, müssen, dürfen, wollen, möchten, sollen.

• If a sentence starts with a subordinate clause, the following main clause starts with the conjugated verb.

Types of subordinate/dependent clauses:


1) Starting with a subordinating conjunction
e.g.: dass, weil, obwohl, bis, wenn, als, nachdem, bevor, danach, dann, ob, ...

a) Ich mag AnnenMayKantereit, weil ihre Lieder toll sind.

b) Dass die Schuhe so teuer sind, hat mich überrascht, denn sie sind von geringer Qualität.

c) Er übte es, bis er es gut konnte.

d) Nachdem es draußen dunkel geworden war, sind wir auf den Jahrmarkt gegangen.
After it had gotten dark outside, we went to the funfair.

e) Ich hatte vergessen mein Handy zu laden, bevor ich wegging.
I had forgotten to charge my mobile before I went out.

f) Ich weiß nicht, ob ich noch dieses Jahr zu Besuch kommen kann.
I don't know if/whether I'll be able to come for a visit still in this year.


2) Relative clauses:

a) Die Schule, auf die ich vorher gegangen bin, lag in der Nähe von unserer Wohnung.

b) Mir gefallen die Schuhe nicht, die in dem Schaufenster stehen.


3) 'Indirect question clauses' starting with a W-question word

a) Ich wusste nicht, wo mein Handy war.
I didn't know where my my mobile was.

b) Ich verstehe nicht genau, was das bedeutet.
I don't understand exactly what this means.

c) Er fragte mich, wann der Zug abfahren würde.
He asked me when the train would depart.

d) Wir wussten zuerst nicht, wie wir zurück ins Hotel kommen sollten.
We didn't know at first, how we were supposed to get back to the hotel.

----
I'm currently writing a 'technical summary' of basic sentence constructions, but I don't have much time, so I can't say when it will be finished...
Last edited by Krokodilo; 5 months ago
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