Mini pill (progesterone only) how is it?

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
I’ve been taken off my combined pill as I was getting migraines and I am going to be put on a progesterone only pill. Can I please get peoples experiences of this? As I am interested in what the difference will be
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Tracey_W
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#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
I’ve been taken off my combined pill as I was getting migraines and I am going to be put on a progesterone only pill. Can I please get peoples experiences of this? As I am interested in what the difference will be
Unfortunately you may still get migraines from this as well as it's one of it side effects but there again you may not get any as all medicines works differently on each individual person ok as what happens to one person don't necessary happens to yourself say.

You'll need to give this new one you been given a chance to work and if any unusual issues with it then speak to your GP again over it.
I'm a registered midwife.


Some facts about the progestogen-only pill....
If taken correctly, it's more than 99% effective. This means fewer than 1 in 100 who uses the progestogen-only pill as contraception will get pregnant in 1 year.
With "typical use" of the progestogen-only pill (the way it's taken by a lot of women in real life), it's only about 91% effective.
You take a pill every day, with no break between packs of pills.
The progestogen-only pill can be used if you cannot use contraception that contains oestrogen.
You can take the progestogen-only pill if you're over 35 and you smoke.
You must take the progestogen-only pill at the same time each day. If you take it more than 3 hours late (traditional progestogen-only pill) – or 12 hours late (desogestrel pill) – it may not be effective.
If you're sick (vomit) or have severe diarrhoea, the progestogen-only pill may not work.
Some medicines may affect the progestogen-only pill's effectiveness – ask your doctor for details.
Your periods may stop or become lighter, irregular or more frequent.
Side effects may include spotty skin and breast tenderness – these should clear up within a few months.
You'll need to use condoms as well as the progestogen-only pill to be protected against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
How to take the progestogen-only pill
There are 2 different types of progestogen-only pill:

3-hour progestogen-only pill (traditional progestogen-only pill) – must be taken within 3 hours of the same time each day
12-hour progestogen-only pill (desogestrel progestogen-only pill) – must be taken within 12 hours of the same time each day
Follow the instructions that come with your pill packet – missing pills or taking the pill alongside other medicines can reduce its effectiveness.

There are 28 pills in a pack of progestogen-only pills. You need to take 1 pill every day within either 3 or 12 hours of the same time each day, depending on which type you're taking.

There's no break between packs of pills – when you finish a pack, you start the next one the next day.

Starting the first pack of pills
choose a convenient time in the day to take your first pill
continue to take a pill at the same time each day until the pack is finished
start your next pack of pills the following day – there's no break between packs of pills
You can start the progestogen-only pill at any time in your menstrual cycle.

If you start it on day 1 to 5 of your menstrual cycle (the first 5 days of your period), it'll work straight away and you'll be protected against pregnancy. You will not need additional contraception.

If you have a short menstrual cycle, you'll need additional contraception, such as condoms, until you've taken the pill for 2 days.

If you start the progestogen-only pill on any other day of your cycle, you will not be protected from pregnancy straight away and will need additional contraception until you've taken the pill for 2 days.





Side effects from The progestogen-only pill is generally well tolerated and side effects are rare
Some side effects include the following:-
acne
breast tenderness and breast enlargement
an increased or decreased sex drive
mood changes
headache and migraine
nausea or vomiting
small fluid-filled sacs (cysts) on your ovaries – these are usually harmless and disappear without treatment
These side effects are most likely to occur during the first few months of taking the progestogen-only pill, but they generally improve over time and should stop within a few months.

If you have any concerns about your contraceptive pill, see your GP or practice nurse. They may advise you to change to another pill or a different form of contraception.

The progestogen-only pill with other medicines
When you take 2 or more medicines at the same time, they can sometimes interact with each other.

Some medicines interact with the progestogen-only pill, which can stop it working properly.

If you want to check whether your medicines are safe to take with the progestogen-only pill, you can:

ask your GP, practice nurse or pharmacist
read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine


😃
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Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by Tracey_W)
Unfortunately you may still get migraines from this as well as it's one of it side effects but there again you may not get any as all medicines works differently on each individual person ok as what happens to one person don't necessary happens to yourself say.

You'll need to give this new one you been given a chance to work and if any unusual issues with it then speak to your GP again over it.
I'm a registered midwife.


Some facts about the progestogen-only pill....
If taken correctly, it's more than 99% effective. This means fewer than 1 in 100 who uses the progestogen-only pill as contraception will get pregnant in 1 year.
With "typical use" of the progestogen-only pill (the way it's taken by a lot of women in real life), it's only about 91% effective.
You take a pill every day, with no break between packs of pills.
The progestogen-only pill can be used if you cannot use contraception that contains oestrogen.
You can take the progestogen-only pill if you're over 35 and you smoke.
You must take the progestogen-only pill at the same time each day. If you take it more than 3 hours late (traditional progestogen-only pill) – or 12 hours late (desogestrel pill) – it may not be effective.
If you're sick (vomit) or have severe diarrhoea, the progestogen-only pill may not work.
Some medicines may affect the progestogen-only pill's effectiveness – ask your doctor for details.
Your periods may stop or become lighter, irregular or more frequent.
Side effects may include spotty skin and breast tenderness – these should clear up within a few months.
You'll need to use condoms as well as the progestogen-only pill to be protected against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
How to take the progestogen-only pill
There are 2 different types of progestogen-only pill:

3-hour progestogen-only pill (traditional progestogen-only pill) – must be taken within 3 hours of the same time each day
12-hour progestogen-only pill (desogestrel progestogen-only pill) – must be taken within 12 hours of the same time each day
Follow the instructions that come with your pill packet – missing pills or taking the pill alongside other medicines can reduce its effectiveness.

There are 28 pills in a pack of progestogen-only pills. You need to take 1 pill every day within either 3 or 12 hours of the same time each day, depending on which type you're taking.

There's no break between packs of pills – when you finish a pack, you start the next one the next day.

Starting the first pack of pills
choose a convenient time in the day to take your first pill
continue to take a pill at the same time each day until the pack is finished
start your next pack of pills the following day – there's no break between packs of pills
You can start the progestogen-only pill at any time in your menstrual cycle.

If you start it on day 1 to 5 of your menstrual cycle (the first 5 days of your period), it'll work straight away and you'll be protected against pregnancy. You will not need additional contraception.

If you have a short menstrual cycle, you'll need additional contraception, such as condoms, until you've taken the pill for 2 days.

If you start the progestogen-only pill on any other day of your cycle, you will not be protected from pregnancy straight away and will need additional contraception until you've taken the pill for 2 days.





Side effects from The progestogen-only pill is generally well tolerated and side effects are rare
Some side effects include the following:-
acne
breast tenderness and breast enlargement
an increased or decreased sex drive
mood changes
headache and migraine
nausea or vomiting
small fluid-filled sacs (cysts) on your ovaries – these are usually harmless and disappear without treatment
These side effects are most likely to occur during the first few months of taking the progestogen-only pill, but they generally improve over time and should stop within a few months.

If you have any concerns about your contraceptive pill, see your GP or practice nurse. They may advise you to change to another pill or a different form of contraception.

The progestogen-only pill with other medicines
When you take 2 or more medicines at the same time, they can sometimes interact with each other.

Some medicines interact with the progestogen-only pill, which can stop it working properly.

If you want to check whether your medicines are safe to take with the progestogen-only pill, you can:

ask your GP, practice nurse or pharmacist
read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine


😃
Aw your great thank you so much for sending all that over!!!! It’s so helpful as I’ve not heard as much about this pill. It sounds not as straight forward as the combined pill which scares me a bit. I get my prescription for the new one end of this week so I’ll see how it goes. I’ve still been taken my old pill am I fine to straight away switch to the new one? I won’t have finished my pack by the time I get my new one so I’m unsure wether to wait until I finish that or to just have my new pill the day I get it?
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black tea
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#4
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Aw your great thank you so much for sending all that over!!!! It’s so helpful as I’ve not heard as much about this pill. It sounds not as straight forward as the combined pill which scares me a bit. I get my prescription for the new one end of this week so I’ll see how it goes. I’ve still been taken my old pill am I fine to straight away switch to the new one? I won’t have finished my pack by the time I get my new one so I’m unsure wether to wait until I finish that or to just have my new pill the day I get it?
I would say it is even more straight forward than the combined pill as you just have to take it every day and don't have to worry about pill breaks and how many days you have to not take it for. Most mini pills now have a 12 hour window during which you can take them so it's super easy to take one later if you do accidentally forget to take it on time.

As for switching from combined pill to the mini pill, you can switch at any point but you may need to use condoms for 7 days to stay protected from pregnancy depending on where you are in your pill pack. Have a look here for more details (click on "switching from a combined contraceptive to mini pill" in the menu on the left).

And just to point out about the migraines, the reason you are are being switched isn't necessarily because the combined pill is causing your migraine but because there is a slightly increased risk of stroke if you have migraines with aura when you are on the combined pill (I'm sure your doctor has probably explained that though )
Last edited by black tea; 2 weeks ago
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Tracey_W
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Anonymous)
Aw your great thank you so much for sending all that over!!!! It’s so helpful as I’ve not heard as much about this pill. It sounds not as straight forward as the combined pill which scares me a bit. I get my prescription for the new one end of this week so I’ll see how it goes. I’ve still been taken my old pill am I fine to straight away switch to the new one? I won’t have finished my pack by the time I get my new one so I’m unsure wether to wait until I finish that or to just have my new pill the day I get it?
Hi

You can start new ones straight away if you wish to, if you only got few left with current one you on then finish them and then start new ones.

Would suggest to use extra protection if having sex with a partner by using condoms for a while till things settle with the other pill okay.
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Anonymous #2
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Report 4 days ago
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Aww I’m the opposite I was on the progesterone only pill but have switched to combined! Reason being the mini pill just made me bleed all the time as in my periods lasting a month or more then I’d stop for a few days and start bleeding again for a month, I was so sick of it because I was on it for almost a year. But everyone’s body will react differently and there have been girls who said their periods got lighter, just wasn’t the case for me!! And of course the mood swings but that’ll probs be the same for the combined anyway
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Anonymous #3
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I also got moved over to progesterone only pills when I started getting migraines - unfortunately I really didn't get on with them. Like the poster above, I just ended up with endless bleeding (and losing ridiculous amounts of blood in short periods of time) and horrible acne and feeling generally depressed. I tried a couple of different types of PoP and then gave up on them altogether bc they made life unbearable.

However, they are easier to take as you don't have to think about a break and they do work really well for some people so don't be put off!
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