basketball4lyfe
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#1
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#1
Hi! I'm taking the IB and HL chem and bio, and I really want to do sports medicine more specifically possibly being an orthopaedic physician or physiotherapist for the NBA or other big sports leagues, does anyone know what path I would need to take at Uni in order to do this?
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Democracy
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#2
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(Original post by basketball4lyfe)
Hi! I'm taking the IB and HL chem and bio, and I really want to do sports medicine more specifically possibly being an orthopaedic physician or physiotherapist for the NBA or other big sports leagues, does anyone know what path I would need to take at Uni in order to do this?
You're mixing up your careers somewhat. If you're in the UK (or hoping to train/work in the UK)...

Orthopaedic surgery - operative and non-operative treatment of surgical conditions involving bones and joints. Depending on subspecialty can commonly involve treatment of sporting injuries.

Sports and exercise medicine - medical treatment of conditions relating to sports and athletes. Traditionally GPs or interested emergency physicians but in recent years have their own (small) specialty training programme. Several routes into training including GP, A&E, and internal medicine.

Rheumatology - treatment of medical conditions involving bones, joints, and soft and connective tissues. Not usually related to sporting injuries.

Orthopaedic physician - this is not a thing. Closest thing would be a rheumatologist.

Physiotherapist - separate profession with completely separate training to all of the above. They do not practice sports medicine.
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basketball4lyfe
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#3
Report Thread starter 6 days ago
#3
(Original post by Democracy)
You're mixing up your careers somewhat. If you're in the UK (or hoping to train/work in the UK)...

Orthopaedic surgery - operative and non-operative treatment of surgical conditions involving bones and joints. Depending on subspecialty can commonly involve treatment of sporting injuries.

Sports and exercise medicine - medical treatment of conditions relating to sports and athletes. Traditionally GPs or interested emergency physicians but in recent years have their own (small) specialty training programme. Several routes into training including GP, A&E, and internal medicine.

Rheumatology - treatment of medical conditions involving bones, joints, and soft and connective tissues. Not usually related to sporting injuries.

Orthopaedic physician - this is not a thing. Closest thing would be a rheumatologist.

Physiotherapist - separate profession with completely separate training to all of the above. They do not practice sports medicine.
I was hoping to work in the US but I don't know what the course would be like, in the sense that what would I have to do as my major in undergrad in order to do sports medicine more specifically orthopaedic surgery? I saw online that I would be required to do at least 12 years of med school?
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skylark2
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#4
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#4
If you want an American medical career having done an American style degree path, then yes, it's going to take you a long time to qualify, at least partly because medicine is a graduate degree in the US - you don't even start until after you have completed your first four year college degree. If time until qualification is important to you, roles such as physiotherapist will be a lot quicker.

You may want to look at finding American sources of information, as while the people here are very knowledgeable, this is a UK site and British medical qualification is very different. To become a doctor or surgeon in the UK, your undergraduate degree would be "medicine". It's much less well-defined to become a physiotherapist as it's common to do that as a postgrad course having done a different undergraduate degree.
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basketball4lyfe
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#5
Report Thread starter 6 days ago
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Yeah, so I was hoping to graduate for undergrad in the UK and head to the US for further certification. Do you think this would be effective, or would it be better to just work in the UK?
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ecolier
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#6
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#6
(Original post by basketball4lyfe)
Yeah, so I was hoping to graduate for undergrad in the UK and head to the US for further certification. Do you think this would be effective, or would it be better to just work in the UK?
My advice is always study where you want to work (if possible).

If you wanted to work in the US as a doctor, you'd need to know that the US discriminates against IMGs and doctors who didn't graduate in America will face tougher competition compared to local grads.
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Democracy
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#7
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#7
(Original post by basketball4lyfe)
I was hoping to work in the US but I don't know what the course would be like, in the sense that what would I have to do as my major in undergrad in order to do sports medicine more specifically orthopaedic surgery? I saw online that I would be required to do at least 12 years of med school?
I don't think anyone in the US becomes an orthopaedic surgeon to then do sports medicine. The difference in income is...a lot and I don't even know if they have portfolio careers in the same way we do here. You're also very unlikely to get into orthopaedic specialty training in the US as an IMG.

I think you need to keep your goals more manageable and realistic. No one goes to medical school with the specific intention of being a doctor for an NBA team; that is the sign of an applicant who hasn't done enough research into what the job is like in real life. Start by deciding whether medicine-in-general (regardless of specialty) is interesting to you, then go from there.

(Original post by basketball4lyfe)
Yeah, so I was hoping to graduate for undergrad in the UK and head to the US for further certification. Do you think this would be effective, or would it be better to just work in the UK?
The numbers aren't great:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wik...ine_in_the_USA
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basketball4lyfe
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#8
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#8
(Original post by ecolier)
My advice is always study where you want to work (if possible).

If you wanted to work in the US as a doctor, you'd need to know that the US discriminates against IMGs and doctors who didn't graduate in America will face tougher competition compared to local grads.
Thank you so much I really appreciate all of your help! I’ll probably try to research more into what I really want to do and see where it goes from there. Thanks again!
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basketball4lyfe
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#9
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#9
(Original post by Democracy)
I don't think anyone in the US becomes an orthopaedic surgeon to then do sports medicine. The difference in income is...a lot and I don't even know if they have portfolio careers in the same way we do here. You're also very unlikely to get into orthopaedic specialty training in the US as an IMG.

I think you need to keep your goals more manageable and realistic. No one goes to medical school with the specific intention of being a doctor for an NBA team; that is the sign of an applicant who hasn't done enough research into what the job is like in real life. Start by deciding whether medicine-in-general (regardless of specialty) is interesting to you, then go from there.



The numbers aren't great:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wik...ine_in_the_USA
Woah i had no idea, thank you so much for all your help! I’m probably going to try to research more into medicine as a whole, and I’ll try to narrow down on something more achievable. Thanks again!
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