cbrr
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#1
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#1
I'm currently going through my year 11 mocks and I've thought about how extra time is given and used by others. I've came to the conclusion that I believe it's not fair and a bad idea.

I love academic achievement, and don't get me wrong I get words mixed up a lot of the time, but when people who don't care about their GCSEs receive access arrangements, eg. extra time in exams, I feel pretty annoyed.

I'm annoyed that though these people might not have extra time in their actual GCSEs, they are thought to be in need of it regardless when they don't even try. Being consistently slow throughout GCSEs doesn't scream "I need help" to me, it screams "I don't care" above all. I know multiple people who need extra time and I'm for it for those people, but I still don't understand when it undermines the entire time limit idea for GCSE exams...
We have strict time limits to produce hundreds of words for most of our exams. History and English in particular are all about time managing so when the people who don't care about learning in lessons and attempt to distract others get given more time in exams, it's infuriating. I support those who need this extra time, and I know people do, but it's quite obvious at times to separate the deserving from the 'idiots'...

Am I being a bad person for believing this? When my exams come up short and rushed when others are thoroughly thought out, am I bad for believing the hard work I've put into my GCSEs has been limited? Idk but are these guys gonna get higher grades though their actual academic performance isn't the same?
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Callicious
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#2
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#2
Personally I wouldn't worry about whether it's fair or not, but more about your own grades and academic performance. Ultimately only a small fraction of folk get it, and by-and-large to be getting it you're not likely to be the lushest cherry on the orchard.

If someone got it and was genuinely awful at whatever they're doing and get a higher grade, and kept riding the coattails of extra-time their entire way to Uni, then once they finished Uni they'd be screwed. Your employer won't give you "extra time" just because you tossed something up- they'll get someone else who won't need it.

Ultimately we're all limited by the time we're given in exams. We could all make perfect answers if we had days to curate our mind to draw out the very best we can. That's not life though. Just ignore the people that get extra (the very few of them) and focus on yourself, knowing that they're not as likely to succeed if they truly don't need that extra time to balance out their own problems with it.
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summerbirdreads
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#3
Report 6 days ago
#3
(Original post by Callicious)
Personally I wouldn't worry about whether it's fair or not, but more about your own grades and academic performance. Ultimately only a small fraction of folk get it, and by-and-large to be getting it you're not likely to be the lushest cherry on the orchard.

If someone got it and was genuinely awful at whatever they're doing and get a higher grade, and kept riding the coattails of extra-time their entire way to Uni, then once they finished Uni they'd be screwed. Your employer won't give you "extra time" just because you tossed something up- they'll get someone else who won't need it.

Ultimately we're all limited by the time we're given in exams. We could all make perfect answers if we had days to curate our mind to draw out the very best we can. That's not life though. Just ignore the people that get extra (the very few of them) and focus on yourself, knowing that they're not as likely to succeed if they truly don't need that extra time to balance out their own problems with it.
PRSOM. Excellent advice!
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AmIReallyHere
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#4
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#4
(Original post by cbrr)
I'm currently going through my year 11 mocks and I've thought about how extra time is given and used by others. I've came to the conclusion that I believe it's not fair and a bad idea.

I love academic achievement, and don't get me wrong I get words mixed up a lot of the time, but when people who don't care about their GCSEs receive access arrangements, eg. extra time in exams, I feel pretty annoyed.

I'm annoyed that though these people might not have extra time in their actual GCSEs, they are thought to be in need of it regardless when they don't even try. Being consistently slow throughout GCSEs doesn't scream "I need help" to me, it screams "I don't care" above all. I know multiple people who need extra time and I'm for it for those people, but I still don't understand when it undermines the entire time limit idea for GCSE exams...
We have strict time limits to produce hundreds of words for most of our exams. History and English in particular are all about time managing so when the people who don't care about learning in lessons and attempt to distract others get given more time in exams, it's infuriating. I support those who need this extra time, and I know people do, but it's quite obvious at times to separate the deserving from the 'idiots'...

Am I being a bad person for believing this? When my exams come up short and rushed when others are thoroughly thought out, am I bad for believing the hard work I've put into my GCSEs has been limited? Idk but are these guys gonna get higher grades though their actual academic performance isn't the same?
Your school shouldn't be giving out extra time unless they actually need it having had proof that they are eligible? Bit of a dumb decision since it might mean they aren't ready for GCSE timing - are you sure they aren't being given access arrangements for a reason that you cannot see?

But if it is just being given out willy-nilly then I agree with you. they should not be getting it.
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Muttley79
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#5
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#5
(Original post by cbrr)
I'm currently going through my year 11 mocks and I've thought about how extra time is given and used by others. I've came to the conclusion that I believe it's not fair and a bad idea.
Extra time is there to make a level playing field - would you rather people got lower results even though they are as good ss you? It is not easy to get additional time ...
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0ptics
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#6
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#6
(Original post by cbrr)
I'm currently going through my year 11 mocks and I've thought about how extra time is given and used by others. I've came to the conclusion that I believe it's not fair and a bad idea.

I love academic achievement, and don't get me wrong I get words mixed up a lot of the time, but when people who don't care about their GCSEs receive access arrangements, eg. extra time in exams, I feel pretty annoyed.

I'm annoyed that though these people might not have extra time in their actual GCSEs, they are thought to be in need of it regardless when they don't even try. Being consistently slow throughout GCSEs doesn't scream "I need help" to me, it screams "I don't care" above all. I know multiple people who need extra time and I'm for it for those people, but I still don't understand when it undermines the entire time limit idea for GCSE exams...
We have strict time limits to produce hundreds of words for most of our exams. History and English in particular are all about time managing so when the people who don't care about learning in lessons and attempt to distract others get given more time in exams, it's infuriating. I support those who need this extra time, and I know people do, but it's quite obvious at times to separate the deserving from the 'idiots'...

Am I being a bad person for believing this? When my exams come up short and rushed when others are thoroughly thought out, am I bad for believing the hard work I've put into my GCSEs has been limited? Idk but are these guys gonna get higher grades though their actual academic performance isn't the same?
You’re worrying about disadvantage yet call those who abuse the advantage “idiots”? Sure hope you can see how small of a issue (relative to the entirety of the UK) we’re talking about. In fact, this small issue gets smaller when those who ‘abuse’ the extra time still get low grades.
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skylark2
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#7
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#7
Getting extra time isn't based on whether someone cares or not, it's based on whether they have a diagnosed medical condition which means that they need extra time to give them a fair chance. That might be because it takes them longer than others to read and process information, or because it takes them longer than others to physically produce their answers. I know someone who got extra time for their GCSEs because they broke their dominant hand the week before so had to write everything with their wrong hand, the alternative being a scribe who they had almost no time to get used to working with. Pretty sure they'd much rather have had neither the broken hand nor the extra time.

When it comes down to it, someone who doesn't care will get a crap mark whether they have two hours to stare at questions they haven't revised for or three.
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booklover1313
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#8
Report 6 days ago
#8
(Original post by cbrr)
I'm currently going through my year 11 mocks and I've thought about how extra time is given and used by others. I've came to the conclusion that I believe it's not fair and a bad idea.

I love academic achievement, and don't get me wrong I get words mixed up a lot of the time, but when people who don't care about their GCSEs receive access arrangements, eg. extra time in exams, I feel pretty annoyed.

I'm annoyed that though these people might not have extra time in their actual GCSEs, they are thought to be in need of it regardless when they don't even try. Being consistently slow throughout GCSEs doesn't scream "I need help" to me, it screams "I don't care" above all. I know multiple people who need extra time and I'm for it for those people, but I still don't understand when it undermines the entire time limit idea for GCSE exams...
We have strict time limits to produce hundreds of words for most of our exams. History and English in particular are all about time managing so when the people who don't care about learning in lessons and attempt to distract others get given more time in exams, it's infuriating. I support those who need this extra time, and I know people do, but it's quite obvious at times to separate the deserving from the 'idiots'...

Am I being a bad person for believing this? When my exams come up short and rushed when others are thoroughly thought out, am I bad for believing the hard work I've put into my GCSEs has been limited? Idk but are these guys gonna get higher grades though their actual academic performance isn't the same?
The exam boards have very strict regulations for who is eligible for extra time. You have to provide evidence by a fully qualified professional, e.g. doctors, educational psychologists, occupational therapists. There also has to be proof that you would be disadvantaged were you not to receive extra time. It is their professional judgement that gives the evidence that is then reviewed by an exam board. If people don't need it, they can't get it.
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CatInTheCorner
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Muttley79)
Extra time is there to make a level playing field - would you rather people got lower results even though they are as good ss you? It is not easy to get additional time ...
Precisely, I'm disabled and don't get extra time, even though I need it. It isn't up for OP, who is not in these people's lives, nor knows their circumstances, to judge them. I seem able bodied, but I'm not, OP would think I'm cheating when I leave the exam room to take a break. Don't assume, OP :closedeyes:
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EOData
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Callicious)
Personally I wouldn't worry about whether it's fair or not, but more about your own grades and academic performance. Ultimately only a small fraction of folk get it,
More than 1 in 5 candidates gets extra time https://www.gov.uk/government/statis...-academic-year

It is an imperfect strategy for creating equality that is widely abused by pushy parents and schools. I don't know how you could create a fair system but the inconsistency between different schools and playing of the system by many is significant.
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usernamechange11
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#11
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#11
(Original post by CatInTheCorner)
Precisely, I'm disabled and don't get extra time, even though I need it. It isn't up for OP, who is not in these people's lives, nor knows their circumstances, to judge them. I seem able bodied, but I'm not, OP would think I'm cheating when I leave the exam room to take a break. Don't assume, OP :closedeyes:
arent you eligible for extra time though since you are disabled?
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CatInTheCorner
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#12
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#12
(Original post by usernamechange11)
arent you eligible for extra time though since you are disabled?
Disabilities are a very wide spectrum, for some people, they might not need it. For my personal case, I am still getting diagnosed after quite a long battle to get that diagnosis, being constantly re-referred takes years. I am applying now, but for my GCSEs and A-level mocks I had no accommodations because I didn't have that diagnosis. My SENCO was an angel to manage to get me breaks during exams, extra time is a whole other thing. I hope to get it soon, however, but my point was that my disability is invisible, and during my breaks in exams the amount of dirty looks I get is ridiculous. Not all disabilities are easy to spot, and people shouldn't assume they know what's going on in people's lives.
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usernamechange11
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#13
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#13
(Original post by cbrr)
I'm currently going through my year 11 mocks and I've thought about how extra time is given and used by others. I've came to the conclusion that I believe it's not fair and a bad idea.

I love academic achievement, and don't get me wrong I get words mixed up a lot of the time, but when people who don't care about their GCSEs receive access arrangements, eg. extra time in exams, I feel pretty annoyed.

I'm annoyed that though these people might not have extra time in their actual GCSEs, they are thought to be in need of it regardless when they don't even try. Being consistently slow throughout GCSEs doesn't scream "I need help" to me, it screams "I don't care" above all. I know multiple people who need extra time and I'm for it for those people, but I still don't understand when it undermines the entire time limit idea for GCSE exams...
We have strict time limits to produce hundreds of words for most of our exams. History and English in particular are all about time managing so when the people who don't care about learning in lessons and attempt to distract others get given more time in exams, it's infuriating. I support those who need this extra time, and I know people do, but it's quite obvious at times to separate the deserving from the 'idiots'...

Am I being a bad person for believing this? When my exams come up short and rushed when others are thoroughly thought out, am I bad for believing the hard work I've put into my GCSEs has been limited? Idk but are these guys gonna get higher grades though their actual academic performance isn't the same?
i get extra time and i have autism. i wouldnt see why it concerns you if someone gets extra time. idk about your school but not just anyone gets extra time. the ones i know that get extra time in my school usually have disabilities and mental conditions. i'd say dont assume if someone needs extra time or not. what you should understand is it isnt just given to anyone. those 'idiots' may have hidden disabilities and conditions that you arent aware of. i find it weird people assume others dont need extra time, as if you'd know who's permitted. focus on yourself same way they are focusing on themselves. the exam boards have very strict regulations for who is eligible for extra time. evidence from a properly certified professional, such as physicians, educational psychologists, or occupational therapists, is required. there must also be evidence that you would be disadvantaged if you were not given more time. good luck with your mocks, maybe focus more on revising than on your peers getting additional time.
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EOData
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#14
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#14
(Original post by CatInTheCorner)
Disabilities are a very wide spectrum, for some people, they might not need it. For my personal case, I am still getting diagnosed after quite a long battle to get that diagnosis, being constantly re-referred takes years. I am applying now, but for my GCSEs and A-level mocks I had no accommodations because I didn't have that diagnosis. My SENCO was an angel to manage to get me breaks during exams, extra time is a whole other thing. I hope to get it soon, however, but my point was that my disability is invisible, and during my breaks in exams the amount of dirty looks I get is ridiculous. Not all disabilities are easy to spot, and people shouldn't assume they know what's going on in people's lives.
The majority of people with long term extra time get it for 'invisible' reasons. Discounting the short term injuries, very few people get it for physical disabilities.
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alma_beu
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#15
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#15
(Original post by EOData)
The majority of people with long term extra time get it for 'invisible' reasons. Discounting the short term injuries, very few people get it for physical disabilities.
Could you please give a source backing up your claims? Or is this just an assumption you have?
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EOData
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#16
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#16
(Original post by alma_beu)
Could you please give a source backing up your claims? Or is this just an assumption you have?
15 years as an exams officer. Ignoring the endless stream of broken arms, I can think of only 2 students who got extra time because of physical disabilities (e.g. missing hand, highly shortened arms) whereas the number getting it for dyslexia etc must have been well over 100.
Last edited by EOData; 6 days ago
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Callicious
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#17
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#17
(Original post by EOData)
More than 1 in 5 candidates gets extra time https://www.gov.uk/government/statis...-academic-year

It is an imperfect strategy for creating equality that is widely abused by pushy parents and schools. I don't know how you could create a fair system but the inconsistency between different schools and playing of the system by many is significant.
Hot damn- 20% is quite a bit. I've never known anyone who got extra time in my classes so I guess my upbringing was a bit off the norm, but I didn't expect it to be this bad (do we really have that weak a population? :_:...)

That being said, "It is an imperfect strategy for creating equality that is widely abused by pushy parents and schools. I don't know how you could create a fair system but the inconsistency between different schools and playing of the system by many is significant." I'd expect this to not be the case in an ideal world, at least based on what others have said. Ostensibly it's difficult to get it (medical reports and whatnot) so I would like to see some sort of statistic on that too (pushy I know but I am genuinely curious now... 20% is a fairly big number, I wonder how many of that 20% are genuinely skunking the system)

At the end of the day, 20% is still an upper limit to the number of people who may be skunking it. Saying that 1/5 in the country are doing that is a bit of push at best (though I am surprised by the 20, who knows? If you can demonstrate that I'd honestly be gobsmacked) and by all likelihood, it's considerably less... I would hope. For a low percentage I would expect my other post to hold up fairly well.
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Muttley79
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#18
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#18
(Original post by EOData)
More than 1 in 5 candidates gets extra time https://www.gov.uk/government/statis...-academic-year

It is an imperfect strategy for creating equality that is widely abused by pushy parents and schools. I don't know how you could create a fair system but the inconsistency between different schools and playing of the system by many is significant.
I assume you can prove these statements?
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usernamechange11
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#19
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#19
(Original post by CatInTheCorner)
Disabilities are a very wide spectrum, for some people, they might not need it. For my personal case, I am still getting diagnosed after quite a long battle to get that diagnosis, being constantly re-referred takes years. I am applying now, but for my GCSEs and A-level mocks I had no accommodations because I didn't have that diagnosis. My SENCO was an angel to manage to get me breaks during exams, extra time is a whole other thing. I hope to get it soon, however, but my point was that my disability is invisible, and during my breaks in exams the amount of dirty looks I get is ridiculous. Not all disabilities are easy to spot, and people shouldn't assume they know what's going on in people's lives.
i hope your diagnosis comes quickly. praying for nothing but the best for you! <33
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Muttley79
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#20
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#20
(Original post by EOData)
15 years as an exams officer. Ignoring the endless stream of broken arms, I can think of only 2 students who got extra time because of physical disabilities (e.g. missing hand, highly shortened arms) whereas the number getting it for dyslexia etc must have been well over 100.
That's not proof - if you were exams officer then you colluded in abusing the system in ONE school. Please don't assume other schools are the same ...
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