Midwifery Personal Statement 2022

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abiwitcomb
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#1
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#1
Hi!
I'm working through my personal statement for my UCAS application for 2022 entry at the moment. My university choices are; Brighton, Canterbury, Surrey, Greenwich, London South Bank.

I'm really struggling with my 'why', implementing my answer to "why do you want to be a midwife/join the course?". For me personally it was becoming a mother myself! I was a young mum (I'm 20) and I had formed such an amazing bond with my midwife and I just fell in love with pregnancy and childbirth. I feel if I put this it is just such a 'cliche' - but it's the truth!

Also how to word my personality traits and personal attributes of why I think I would be a good midwife is also becoming a struggle. I feel as if I am just writing "I am a dedicated, caring individual", "I am incredibly compassionate", I don't want to appear as just listing things. Is there anywhere I can include these things in a better way??

I would appreciate some help so much!!!
I applied last year got through to interview stages for 2 universities however didn't get in. I realised my personal statement was quite weak!

Thank you so much!
Abi
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maddyw17
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#2
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#2
Hi Abi,

You may feel like your reasoning for wanting to be a midwife sounds 'cliché' but it's honest and that is what they want. You have experience of being a mother and being surrounded by midwifes which will give you a unique perspective and make you stand out in a group of other applicants who don't have such experience.

Rather than just listing your skills, explain how you have shown such skills and why it is important for midwives to possess such skills. For example, during my time working at my part time job I regularly talk to customers allowing me to develop my communication skills, which are essential in my future role as a midwife. You can do this with any skill, just give a quick explanation of a scenario or role you have undertaken and explain what skill you developed as a result, and why this makes you a good candidate.

Hope that helps,
Maddy
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Tracey_W
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#3
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#3
(Original post by abiwitcomb)
Hi!
I'm working through my personal statement for my UCAS application for 2022 entry at the moment. My university choices are; Brighton, Canterbury, Surrey, Greenwich, London South Bank.

I'm really struggling with my 'why', implementing my answer to "why do you want to be a midwife/join the course?". For me personally it was becoming a mother myself! I was a young mum (I'm 20) and I had formed such an amazing bond with my midwife and I just fell in love with pregnancy and childbirth. I feel if I put this it is just such a 'cliche' - but it's the truth!

Also how to word my personality traits and personal attributes of why I think I would be a good midwife is also becoming a struggle. I feel as if I am just writing "I am a dedicated, caring individual", "I am incredibly compassionate", I don't want to appear as just listing things. Is there anywhere I can include these things in a better way??

I would appreciate some help so much!!!
I applied last year got through to interview stages for 2 universities however didn't get in. I realised my personal statement was quite weak!

Thank you so much!
Abi
Hi Abi

Good to hear you having another go at getting into midwifing as don't give up your dream of being a midwife.
Use what your wrote last year in your personal statement and try to juggle it about with adding & taking out things that will help you.
Midwifing is one of the hardest course to get onto due to the limited numbers they take in each year at all UK universities.

Obviously we can't tell you what to write in it as this is down to yourself but I can give you some ideals to think about and then find ways of using it okay.

I know you wish to do midwifing but as a alternative choice had you thought of adult nursing as at the end of the day you can still get a job as a nurse once qualified on maternity wards. I am only suggesting this because I know what it is like to be rejected for all my universities over a period of about 5 years then I left it for few years before reapplying and I got offered midwifing ( I always wanted to be a adult nurse first then go on and do the 20 months shortened top-up midwife degree and go become a midwife ) .

I am now a registered midwife as qualified in 2019.
Good luck with your personal statement and any interviews you hopefully get.

===================================================
Do
Be organised. Before you start writing, make bullet points of everything you want to include and order them in terms of importance
Show passion
Show you understand the reality of being a nurse or midwife. For example, 24-hour care / on call / shifts
Start writing early. Give yourself plenty of time to read, edit and check - and then, check again!
Write it in a Word document and then copy and paste it into UCAS when ready
Focus on your field of choice, whether it's adult, child, mental health, learning disability nursing or midwifery
Why have you chosen to study a midwifery or nursing degree? Explain your choice. What is your inspiration to be a nurse in that field or a midwife?
Tell us what qualities you bring to the nursing course
Think about what values and qualities you need to be a good nurse or midwife. How you can show evidence of these?
Tell us what experiences you have and how they will help you in your field of choice. These do not necessarily have to be care experiences
Demonstrate your overall awareness of being on a midwifery or nursing degree – 50% theory and 50% practice for example
Only mention hobbies that reveal something relevant about you. Perhaps they have taught you good timekeeping skills, teamwork or given you extra insight or experience in your area of interest
Proof read. Correct spelling and grammar is absolutely vital. A misplaced apostrophe or absence of capital letters can be seriously off-putting. Use the spell-check on your computer and get parents and teachers to proofread your statement
Don't

Don't simply list what you have done. Saying you were captain of the hockey team or spent a week at a local newspaper is not very helpful unless you use it to show what you learned from the experience
Don't use clichés. One of the most overused opening sentences is: My mother or grandmother was a nurse/midwife...
Don’t say you want to be a nurse/midwife just because you have watched a TV programme (several possibilities here!)
Don't use famous quotes from people you admire. We are interested in what you have to say - not Florence Nightingale
Don't list your interests, demonstrate them. Actually doing something, such as joining a national society, volunteering or being involved in a charity, shows you have passion and drive
Don't ask too many people for advice. Input from parents and teachers can be helpful, but this is a personal statement - we want to hear your voice and personality.
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abiwitcomb
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Tracey_W)
Hi Abi

Good to hear you having another go at getting into midwifing as don't give up your dream of being a midwife.
Use what your wrote last year in your personal statement and try to juggle it about with adding & taking out things that will help you.
Midwifing is one of the hardest course to get onto due to the limited numbers they take in each year at all UK universities.

Obviously we can't tell you what to write in it as this is down to yourself but I can give you some ideals to think about and then find ways of using it okay.

I know you wish to do midwifing but as a alternative choice had you thought of adult nursing as at the end of the day you can still get a job as a nurse once qualified on maternity wards. I am only suggesting this because I know what it is like to be rejected for all my universities over a period of about 5 years then I left it for few years before reapplying and I got offered midwifing ( I always wanted to be a adult nurse first then go on and do the 20 months shortened top-up midwife degree and go become a midwife ) .

I am now a registered midwife as qualified in 2019.
Good luck with your personal statement and any interviews you hopefully get.

===================================================
Do
Be organised. Before you start writing, make bullet points of everything you want to include and order them in terms of importance
Show passion
Show you understand the reality of being a nurse or midwife. For example, 24-hour care / on call / shifts
Start writing early. Give yourself plenty of time to read, edit and check - and then, check again!
Write it in a Word document and then copy and paste it into UCAS when ready
Focus on your field of choice, whether it's adult, child, mental health, learning disability nursing or midwifery
Why have you chosen to study a midwifery or nursing degree? Explain your choice. What is your inspiration to be a nurse in that field or a midwife?
Tell us what qualities you bring to the nursing course
Think about what values and qualities you need to be a good nurse or midwife. How you can show evidence of these?
Tell us what experiences you have and how they will help you in your field of choice. These do not necessarily have to be care experiences
Demonstrate your overall awareness of being on a midwifery or nursing degree – 50% theory and 50% practice for example
Only mention hobbies that reveal something relevant about you. Perhaps they have taught you good timekeeping skills, teamwork or given you extra insight or experience in your area of interest
Proof read. Correct spelling and grammar is absolutely vital. A misplaced apostrophe or absence of capital letters can be seriously off-putting. Use the spell-check on your computer and get parents and teachers to proofread your statement
Don't

Don't simply list what you have done. Saying you were captain of the hockey team or spent a week at a local newspaper is not very helpful unless you use it to show what you learned from the experience
Don't use clichés. One of the most overused opening sentences is: My mother or grandmother was a nurse/midwife...
Don’t say you want to be a nurse/midwife just because you have watched a TV programme (several possibilities here!)
Don't use famous quotes from people you admire. We are interested in what you have to say - not Florence Nightingale
Don't list your interests, demonstrate them. Actually doing something, such as joining a national society, volunteering or being involved in a charity, shows you have passion and drive
Don't ask too many people for advice. Input from parents and teachers can be helpful, but this is a personal statement - we want to hear your voice and personality.
I appreciate this so very much. Thank you!!
I was completely gutted when I didn't get into my universities last year. I was halfway through my midwifery access course and ended up taking a 6 month break because I felt so down about not getting in! I'm back to complete the course now with a better mindset. (Fingers crossed).

Congratulations on your journey to becoming a midwife. I've actually had quite a few people mention to me about considering adult nursing. Is this easier to get into compared to midwifery? I truly might debate this. I'm so worried about not getting into midwifery for another year, I feel another out means another year away from a career for myself and my son....
Midwifery is definitely my passion, but I guess as long as I got there in the end I would be okay with that.

Thank you so much for your personal statement advice
Abi
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abiwitcomb
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#5
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#5
(Original post by maddyw17)
Hi Abi,

You may feel like your reasoning for wanting to be a midwife sounds 'cliché' but it's honest and that is what they want. You have experience of being a mother and being surrounded by midwifes which will give you a unique perspective and make you stand out in a group of other applicants who don't have such experience.

Rather than just listing your skills, explain how you have shown such skills and why it is important for midwives to possess such skills. For example, during my time working at my part time job I regularly talk to customers allowing me to develop my communication skills, which are essential in my future role as a midwife. You can do this with any skill, just give a quick explanation of a scenario or role you have undertaken and explain what skill you developed as a result, and why this makes you a good candidate.

Hope that helps,
Maddy
Thank you so much that's really helpful and reasurring!
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Don1122
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#6
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#6
Can anyone help me I done an access to he course , I do not meet the requirements for midwifery as you need distinctions, I have some merits and passes.Does anyone have on any advice on what I should do, will they even look at my application?Any advice welcomed.
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abiwitcomb
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Don1122)
Can anyone help me I done an access to he course , I do not meet the requirements for midwifery as you need distinctions, I have some merits and passes.Does anyone have on any advice on what I should do, will they even look at my application?Any advice welcomed.
I'm not sure whether this is 100% correct but I'm sure they would consider your application even if you didn't meet their entry requirements? I'm not really sure what you would do in this situation. I know that most universities require a certain number of credits at distinction level for the access course, but at the same time I know universities are really keen on access course applicants.
Can you not speak to tutors from your course, maybe there is a possibility of re-doing some units to get higher grades?!? Absolutely no idea.
But I still don't see the harm in applying? You can still really shine in the interview process and make them aware you acknowledge you don't meet part of the entry requirements but are still a strong candidate. After all, even with ordinary A-levels they still consider people on every course who maybe get one C out of a BBB entry requirement.. so I'm sure they can do the same.

I'm part way through my access course at the moment and have set myself targets to try and get the amount of distinctions I need for entry...I'm really worried I won't get the right amount of distinctions and it's stressful

I would definitely speak to somebody on your course or an admissions tutor from the universities you are hoping to go to and see what they say.
Good luck, you'll get there in the end.
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Tracey_W
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Don1122)
Can anyone help me I done an access to he course , I do not meet the requirements for midwifery as you need distinctions, I have some merits and passes.Does anyone have on any advice on what I should do, will they even look at my application?Any advice welcomed.
Hi
I'm sure you'll need to have at least the minimum entry requirements for midwifing. You could submit it but may get rejected straight away but you won't know till you try.

Alternatively you could try applying for adult nursing if not successful for midwifing.

A registered midwife
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Don1122
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#9
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#9
(Original post by abiwitcomb)
I'm not sure whether this is 100% correct but I'm sure they would consider your application even if you didn't meet their entry requirements? I'm not really sure what you would do in this situation. I know that most universities require a certain number of credits at distinction level for the access course, but at the same time I know universities are really keen on access course applicants.
Can you not speak to tutors from your course, maybe there is a possibility of re-doing some units to get higher grades?!? Absolutely no idea.
But I still don't see the harm in applying? You can still really shine in the interview process and make them aware you acknowledge you don't meet part of the entry requirements but are still a strong candidate. After all, even with ordinary A-levels they still consider people on every course who maybe get one C out of a BBB entry requirement.. so I'm sure they can do the same.

I'm part way through my access course at the moment and have set myself targets to try and get the amount of distinctions I need for entry...I'm really worried I won't get the right amount of distinctions and it's stressful

I would definitely speak to somebody on your course or an admissions tutor from the universities you are hoping to go to and see what they say.
Good luck, you'll get there in the end.
Thank you for the reply,
I completed my access course a couple of years ago now, my tutor left and moved the year I finished .
My merits are in science subjects so I don’t know if that will be a plus. Worth a try if not I’ll apply aswell to do foundation year. Good luck it’s stressful but you can do it !!! I think your grammar and everything has to be perfect to achieve an distinction too so just double check it . And just follow the brief you can’t go wrong. To be fair I didn’t try my hardest , a lot of students on the course got distinctions though x
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Don1122
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Tracey_W)
Hi
I'm sure you'll need to have at least the minimum entry requirements for midwifing. You could submit it but may get rejected straight away but you won't know till you try.

Alternatively you could try applying for adult nursing if not successful for midwifing.

A registered midwife
Does this mean ucas will automatically reject me from applying to universities?
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Tracey_W
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Don1122)
Does this mean ucas will automatically reject me from applying to universities?
Not of don't mean you'll be automatically rejected okay,

I think Arden on the other thread you wrote on gave you some good points on what to do as you'll need to talk to your course tutors on this .
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