a level physics AQA do i need to know this?

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Htx_x346
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#1
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#1
do I need to know the bit about the weight being proportional to the frictional force? or basically anything after the first paragraph- do I need to know it? The spec doesn't seem to mention it, but it is in the textbook.

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gabriela4
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#2
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i've already covered this in school, and we learnt about skidding and slipping, but nothing else, other than that, after the first equation.
i can't say yes or no for sure if we need to know that, but that's what we've covered.
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Callicious
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#3
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https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...08-SP-2015.PDF

I think this is the syllabus- or maybe something similar, idk. Anyway, use Google and find a syllabus- they exist online.

I got taught it, and it was in all the books they tried to get us to use (granted I didn't use them, but I did note that the teacher made a heavy point of it when going through it.)
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Htx_x346
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(Original post by Callicious)
https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...08-SP-2015.PDF

I think this is the syllabus- or maybe something similar, idk. Anyway, use Google and find a syllabus- they exist online.

I got taught it, and it was in all the books they tried to get us to use (granted I didn't use them, but I did note that the teacher made a heavy point of it when going through it.)
Like I specified in the OP, I checked the specification.

(Original post by gabriela4)
i've already covered this in school, and we learnt about skidding and slipping, but nothing else, other than that, after the first equation.
i can't say yes or no for sure if we need to know that, but that's what we've covered.
Thanks, I'll learn it just in case.
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Callicious
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(Original post by Htx_x346)
Like I specified in the OP, I checked the specification.


Thanks, I'll learn it just in case.
And the specification mentions knowing the qualitative treatment of it, and the textbook has a qualitative example (i.e. force proportional to weight, for this example.)

Seems like you answered your own question, unless you didn't check the specification.
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KO2462
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#6
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Good Evening.

I am currently studying AQA A-Level Physics myself: we have finished all but one (Thermal Physics) of the second year topics and so have nearly covered everything in full.

Centripetal Force & acceleration is required to be known for the exam. However, the example above is not required; nor is the co-efficient of friction.
A lot of people do seem to be slightly confused with centripetal force in the sense that it is a concept, not a defined force.
It is handy to beware of centripetal force in different scenarios though, hence identifying what the centripetal force is in each situation.
For example, as a car is circling a roundabout, the centripetal force is friction. However, this changes for each scenario. Another example would be as a satellite orbits around an object, the centripetal force is the gravitational attraction.
As I’m sure you are aware, Centripetal force always acts towards the center.

Also, I recommend taking a look at the ‘CGP’ A-Level physics textbook, as their products are designed specifically for the AQA exams.
Physicsandmathstutor.com is a great place to target specific topics, such as centripetal force (further mechanics). There you can find detailed notes, flashcards, examples and exam questions for the AQA specification.

Hope you find this helpful.
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Htx_x346
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#7
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(Original post by Callicious)
And the specification mentions knowing the qualitative treatment of it, and the textbook has a qualitative example (i.e. force proportional to weight, for this example.)

Seems like you answered your own question, unless you didn't check the specification.
doesn't say that but ok.
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Callicious
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(Original post by Htx_x346)
doesn't say that but ok.
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Anyhow my point is that the syllabus isn't going to mention every last little equation- it's more like a guideline- the stuff in the official textbook (or whichever one that may be out there now- Idk the ones that used to exist) will have the full context for it.
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Htx_x346
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#9
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(Original post by Callicious)
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that's projectile motion.

this is the circular motion topic. Thanks anyway though, appreciate it
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Callicious
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Htx_x346)
that's projectile motion.

this is the circular motion topic. Thanks anyway though, appreciate it
The physics across chapters can be mixed- circular motion is leveraged in magnetism and you use mechanics in thermodynamics to derive the ideal gas laws. It's all part of the stuff you learn... see my updated answer on the other thing.

(also friction forces are taught in the projectile motion topic- you can use them in other topics, though. You should encounter them initially when dealing with inclined slopes and the like.)
Last edited by Callicious; 7 months ago
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