About sectioning.

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Tipx
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#1
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#1
Say you go to a GP for mental health problems. At what level of severity would they consider sectioning you? Is there anything they'd hear that would cause them to definitely have to consider it?

Unrelatedly I suppose, is downplaying anything to avoid sectioning a good idea?

Asking for a 'friend'.
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Cancelled Alice
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#2
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Sectioning is always used as a last resort, they start thinking about it when a patient is displaying symptoms of mental illness, isn’t able to or chooses not to engage with treatment and is a risk to themselves or other people. It’s not just about how unwell you are, although it will factor in to it, sectioning is all about risk management.
Being suicidal or having urges to self harm won’t automatically get you locked up.

You may be overestimating how ‘on the ball’ mental health services and GPs are.

I don’t think downplaying anything is a good idea, if you want to get help, you need to tell them what you need help with. Waiting lists can be long, the riskier you are and the more unwell the shorter the wait time.
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black tea
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Tipx)
At what level of severity would they consider sectioning you?
If they think you are at risk to yourself because of a mental health problem and are refusing treatment voluntarily
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one_two_three
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#4
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I think if you are able to consider 'downplaying' your symptoms you are probably not at risk of being sectioned and your illness can be managed in other ways. However, if you probably should be sectioned and the doctor does not section you then it is likely that not long afterwards the police will be called and you will be detained under the mental health act for an assessment.
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black tea
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#5
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(Original post by one_two_three)
I think if you are able to consider 'downplaying' your symptoms you are probably not at risk of being sectioned and your illness can be managed in other ways. However, if you probably should be sectioned and the doctor does not section you then it is likely that not long afterwards the police will be called and you will be detained under the mental health act for an assessment.
being sectioned and being detained under the mental health act are the same thing
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Cancelled Alice
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(Original post by one_two_three)
I think if you are able to consider 'downplaying' your symptoms you are probably not at risk of being sectioned and your illness can be managed in other ways. However, if you probably should be sectioned and the doctor does not section you then it is likely that not long afterwards the police will be called and you will be detained under the mental health act for an assessment.
If you left the GP surgery threatening to do X imminently, they probably would call the police. If a GP was very concerned about a patient’s mental health they would ordinarily involve the mental health services/ the crisis team. A police section isn’t the standard of care.
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one_two_three
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#7
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(Original post by Cancelled Alice)
If you left the GP surgery threatening to do X imminently, they probably would call the police. If a GP was very concerned about a patient’s mental health they would ordinarily involve the mental health services/ the crisis team. A police section isn’t the standard of care.
My point I am making is that if someone ought to be sectioned then if it isn't caught in time by the health professionals then the police would soon be notified about what was happening as most people will call the police when it gets to that stage rather than the health professionals.

(Original post by black tea)
being sectioned and being detained under the mental health act are the same thing
I am aware they are the same thing but they are slightly different processes and obviously the involvement is slightly different as well - one is completed by health professionals and one by the police. The police will call it a detainment under the mental health act because you are not free to leave.
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black tea
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#8
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#8
(Original post by one_two_three)
My point I am making is that if someone ought to be sectioned then if it isn't caught in time by the health professionals then the police would soon be notified about what was happening as most people will call the police when it gets to that stage rather than the health professionals.


I am aware they are the same thing but they are slightly different processes and obviously the involvement is slightly different as well - one is completed by health professionals and one by the police. The police will call it a detainment under the mental health act because you are not free to leave.
The police can't detain someone, they can only bring someone to a place of safety for assessment by a health professional (who can then detain then under the mental health act)
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one_two_three
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#9
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(Original post by black tea)
The police can't detain someone, they can only bring someone to a place of safety for assessment by a health professional (who can then detain then under the mental health act)
We would call it a detainment because they are not free to leave and they are taken to a place of safety - it is police terminology for what we do. If someone is not free to leave but not under arrest then we call it detained. It is not specific to mental health and a generic term. s136 is not conducted on a voluntary basis and we would always try to encourage attending on a voluntary basis before using s136. So whilst a medical professional may call that sectioning, the police would often refer to it as detained.
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black tea
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#10
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(Original post by one_two_three)
We would call it a detainment because they are not free to leave and they are taken to a place of safety - it is police terminology for what we do. If someone is not free to leave but not under arrest then we call it detained. It is not specific to mental health and a generic term. s136 is not conducted on a voluntary basis and we would always try to encourage attending on a voluntary basis before using s136. So whilst a medical professional may call that sectioning, the police would often refer to it as detained.
Obviously, the word "detained" has a lot of definition but when I have heard that term used by medical professionals, it has always meant detained under the mental health act for assessment or treatment. I have actually never heard the word "sectioned" used by a medical professional (that might just be a Scottish thing though as the law and terminology are slightly different here). But yeah, what you are referring to is definitely very different from being sectioned.
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