how are people with autism going to open days successfully?

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Anonymous #1
#1
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#1
how on earth are autistic people going to open days successfully? what am i doing wrong?
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Anonymous #2
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Well I haven't done uni days, but I've done open days for school. Only problem is I wasn't diagnosed at the time so masked without knowing it.

I'd say to remember to bring-
- stim toys
- noise cancellers
- comfy clothing

And don't try to mask too much because it backfires. Like, with me, I successfully masked but I paid the price for it when I went to my school because everyone thought I wasn't 'being the real me' so try to be yourself (I know it's hard but it's worth it)
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marple
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(Original post by Anonymous)
how on earth are autistic people going to open days successfully? what am i doing wrong?
If you find them stressful, it may be worth "doing it on your own" and ignoring the formal open days. Most of the information is available on-line - stuff on student finance/clubs & societies/ accommodation options (often with pictures and videos) etc. It nice to get a feel for the university, but you can go and walk round the campus perfectly easily any day of the week. Obviously you won't be able to go into halls of residence, lecture halls etc, but you can get a feel for the campus and see accommodation you are interested in from the outside to see if the location etc suites you. Touring halls is interesting, but you typically only go into one, which is probably not where you will end up. It's the same with a lot of the facilities - one lecture hall/lab/library is pretty much like another in terms of functionality. If there is course specific information you want, you can email or call the department you are interested in with any queries

Perhaps contact the student support service at the uni you are interested in and see if you can make an appointment to meet and talk through what support will be available to you, and you could combine it with your own "walking tour" of the university site.

Best of luck
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by marple)
If you find them stressful, it may be worth "doing it on your own" and ignoring the formal open days. Most of the information is available on-line - stuff on student finance/clubs & societies/ accommodation options (often with pictures and videos) etc. It nice to get a feel for the university, but you can go and walk round the campus perfectly easily any day of the week. Obviously you won't be able to go into halls of residence, lecture halls etc, but you can get a feel for the campus and see accommodation you are interested in from the outside to see if the location etc suites you. Touring halls is interesting, but you typically only go into one, which is probably not where you will end up. It's the same with a lot of the facilities - one lecture hall/lab/library is pretty much like another in terms of functionality. If there is course specific information you want, you can email or call the department you are interested in with any queries

Perhaps contact the student support service at the uni you are interested in and see if you can make an appointment to meet and talk through what support will be available to you, and you could combine it with your own "walking tour" of the university site.

Best of luck
hii,

thankyou for replying. i did actually do it on my own at the start but pictures and videos are very different to how it feels in real life. believe it on not, on the website it looked ok. in real life though, HAH never ever going again. you also get a feel of the people who are also planning to go too and they just all looked 19 or 30. i didnt fit in.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Well I haven't done uni days, but I've done open days for school. Only problem is I wasn't diagnosed at the time so masked without knowing it.

I'd say to remember to bring-
- stim toys
- noise cancellers
- comfy clothing

And don't try to mask too much because it backfires. Like, with me, I successfully masked but I paid the price for it when I went to my school because everyone thought I wasn't 'being the real me' so try to be yourself (I know it's hard but it's worth it)
thankyou so much!! i really appreciate this. stim toys i forgot
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evangr
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I’ve just been walking around the university on my own. I know I’m missing out on some things this way but it’s for my comfort.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by evangr)
I’ve just been walking around the university on my own. I know I’m missing out on some things this way but it’s for my comfort.
lucky. i cant even do it on my own without a sensory meltdown 2 mins in
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Cancelled Alice
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(Original post by Anonymous)
lucky. i cant even do it on my own without a sensory meltdown 2 mins in
Can I ask, what exactly are you struggling with? Is it just the sensory side of things or are you finding it difficult to adapt to a new environment or is it something else entirely different?
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
thankyou so much!! i really appreciate this. stim toys i forgot
Ah right, I always need at least 3 on me otherwise I freak out :lol:
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Cancelled Alice)
Can I ask, what exactly are you struggling with? Is it just the sensory side of things or are you finding it difficult to adapt to a new environment or is it something else entirely different?
sensory side, change of environment, there was no real structure that i could follow i usually follow timetables strictly with times, how long it will take and everything, where i have to be at a specific time with the name of the room. im really planned out. i don’t think university is for me and it’s all because of my ASD. it’s sad
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Petetyerman
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most universities disability team will offer support to those considering applying and will usually be willing to organise support through the whole process.THe equality act requires them to adjust to make it as easy as possible for you they are usually very aware of ASD and will have systems set up to help.
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SIC.
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#12
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It could be a great idea to reach out to the University's Disability Team. They'll be able to provide accommodations for you, and support you. It could also be a good idea to ask them when the busiest days/hours are - knowing this, you can plan to look around during the quieter hours, which may be less overwhelming.

Also, find the names of the professors who teach the courses your interested in, and privately reach out. If you explain that you're a prospective student, and the open days are very overwhelming for you but you'd love the opportunity to chat, you may be able to chat with them privately.

Reach out to the Student's Union, too - often they will have an equality, diversity, or wellbeing officer, and they'll likely be able to help and recommend accommodations for you!

I hope this helps

-Emily
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