Why do Law and Medicine have very high entry requirements?

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McDonaldsEmploy
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#1
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#1
Maybe this is obvious and I am thick (most likely)
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ecolier
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I can speak for Medicine - it's supply and demand.

The course itself is not easy either.
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looloo2134
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People with higher grades are less likely to drop out of the course and have families who support them. A degree in medicine veterinary medicine cost the government over £30000 a year so they don't want people dropping out.

Law is because people think it prestigious degree to have but they are unaware of the apprenticeship route.
A person could leave school at sixteen with G to D grade GCSE's and because a qualified lawyer in seven to eight years through employer sponsorship apprenticeship.

However the apprenticeship route is very mentally and physically draining and studying on top of a full time job is not for everybody. Also an employer would have to believe in you and your commitment in the role.
Last edited by looloo2134; 1 month ago
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The University of Law Students
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(Original post by McDonaldsEmploy)
Maybe this is obvious and I am thick (most likely)
Hi McDonaldsEmploy

I can speak for law. As Ecolier Volunteer Team identified, competition is a key influencer.

With that being said, if you are considering a law degree, there are many institutions which offer lower entry requirements which may be worth looking at.

There are also other means to qualifications as looloo2134 pointed out including solicitor apprenticeships and CILEx.

If you have any specific questions about studying law, please ask away!

James

ULaw Student Ambassador
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harrysbar
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I wouldn’t want a doctor who wasn’t very bright - or a lawyer come to that
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thegeek888
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Law is the most popular degree in the UK!!! It has the higher entry requirements even at lower ranked universities with BBB or BBC and A*AA at the top tier!!!
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meddad
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#7
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(Original post by thegeek888)
Law is the most popular degree in the UK!!! It has the higher entry requirements even at lower ranked universities with BBB or BBC and A*AA at the top tier!!!
On a point of factual accuracy, Law isn't the most popular degree in the UK. Other degrees also have higher minimum entry requirements than you mention.... plus you didn't answer the original poster's question.

Apart from that, good points well presented 😊
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McDonaldsEmploy
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(Original post by harrysbar)
I wouldn’t want a doctor who wasn’t very bright - or a lawyer come to that
Most people would share that same sentiment yes
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rosy_posy
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They are competitive subjects, although the entry requirements can depend on how reputable the uni is.
Tests such as the LNAT for Law, and the UCAT and BMAT for Medicine help narrow down who gets in and who doesn't.
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looloo2134
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(Original post by McDonaldsEmploy)
Most people would share that same sentiment yes
In my experience the people who get good grades come from good excellent schools and have very support families. There not necessarily more able than a person from a Leeds council estate from a bad school and less supportive family. They just got good opportunities.
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_Rusty_
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(Original post by looloo2134)
In my experience the people who get good grades come from good excellent schools and have very support families. There not necessarily more able than a person from a Leeds council estate from a bad school and less supportive family. They just got good opportunities.
I wouldn't say thats true anymore due to Widening Participation criteria trying to level the playing field - can only speak for medicine
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looloo2134
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(Original post by chris01928)
I wouldn't say thats true anymore due to Widening Participation criteria trying to level the playing field - can only speak for medicine
How many people know about widening participation criteria also many bad schools get children good GCSE's grades. I never heard of bmat myself.
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_Rusty_
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(Original post by looloo2134)
How many people know about widening participation criteria also many bad schools get children good GCSE's grades. I never heard of bmat myself.
I'd say if you are applying to medicine you would know about them - they're all over the websites.

I don't understand your point about bad schools, good GCSEs or your point about the BMAT?
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ElderlyMedic
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Both are mostly cramming contests, in the UK medchools are really difficult and expensive to setup
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looloo2134
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(Original post by chris01928)
I'd say if you are applying to medicine you would know about them - they're all over the websites.

I don't understand your point about bad schools, good GCSEs or your point about the BMAT?
Your lucky that never attended sn inadequate school if did your understanding why students got lower grades GCSE's.
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skylark2
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Law doesn't have particularly high entry requirements. I mean, it does at the most desirable universities, but so does every other subject they offer. You want to study law at UEL? The requirement for their law degree with a foundation year is 48 UCAS points from 3 A levels (that's EEE) and grade C at GCSE English.

The medicine requirements are maintained at an artificially high level because there is a tightly controlled number of places available in this country and far more would-be doctors than places.
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(Original post by looloo2134)
Your lucky that never attended sn inadequate school if did your understanding why students got lower grades GCSE's.
I don't know why you've assumed that

I went to a school with low rates of further education. live in an area of low 20% deprivation. Parent has never been to uni. Young Carer experience. Literally tick all of the widening criteria boxes. Just because you haven't explained something well doesn't mean that I'm from an affluent area just that I am asking you to reword what you have said:lol:
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looloo2134
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(Original post by chris01928)
I don't know why you've assumed that

I went to a school with low rates of further education. live in an area of low 20% deprivation. Parent has never been to uni. Young Carer experience. Literally tick all of the widening criteria boxes. Just because you haven't explained something well doesn't mean that I'm from an affluent area just that I am asking you to reword what you have said:lol:
Will your in an minority there very few people that background at top universities.
But it you when in a school in London your be mostly excellent schools it easier to get into a good university whatever background you come from.
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_Rusty_
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(Original post by looloo2134)
Will your in an minority there very few people that background at top universities.
But it you when in a school in London your be mostly excellent schools it easier to get into a good university whatever background you come from.
Really, how have you come to that conclusion?
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looloo2134
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#20
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(Original post by chris01928)
Really, how have you come to that conclusion?
Because of school funding a school in London get around £3000 to £4000 a school per pupil a year than the northeast. If your interested in how schools are funded there government website that explains its. Also schools in London have better quality of teachers.
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