Is 21 too old to start studying medicine?

Watch
gghgggd5ht
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
A 3rd gap year is starting to look likely 😖
0
reply
minecraftcow
Badges: 10
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
no
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by gghgggd5ht)
A 3rd gap year is starting to look likely 😖
You are never too old to study Medicine, even in your 80s.

You can be too old to be a junior doctor, in my opinion. About the age of 40s I personally would not want to be an FY1 doctor.
0
reply
Mesopotamian.
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
No, you may have heard of graduate entry medicine which is a route specifically for people who have already obtained a degree - therefore lots of people will start studying medicine aged 21 or over.
0
reply
Admit-One
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
It’s not unusual for med applicants to have 2-3 bites of the cherry. Definitely not too old.
0
reply
asif007
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
There are people on my course in their 30's and 40's
0
reply
Agitha
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by ecolier)
You can be too old to be a junior doctor, in my opinion. About the age of 40s I personally would not want to be an FY1 doctor.
Hello ecolier. I would be very interested to hear more about your personal thoughts on this; could you please elaborate on the extra challenges you identify re. entering FY1 in one's 40s? Apart from the obvious, i.e. being rather damned tired all the time!
Last edited by Agitha; 1 month ago
0
reply
HelloHello143
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
My friend is doing medicine in bulgaria, most are around her age (18/19) but one of them is 36 lol, never too late, there will be mature students wherever u go

Tbh the age difference between 19 and 21 is nothing
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Agitha)
Hello ecolier. I would be very interested to hear more about your personal thoughts on this; could you please elaborate on the extra challenges you identify re. entering FY1 in one's 40s? Apart from the obvious, i.e. being rather damned tired all the time!
Presumably as someone who's in their later years (in terms of their career life) they would be:
- rooted to a particular region, hard to move round (and junior doctor training requires moving around). This is probably the main reason
- as you said, working tough, unsocial hours is not easy for someone older
- earning potentially less than other people in your age group (high £20k - low £30k as an FY1 in your 40s is not easy to take)
- being "bossed around" by people who may be younger than you
- tougher to pass post-grad exams (potentially)
- still a long road ahead of you as an FY1 - assuming that you're an FY1 as a 40 year old, the youngest you'd be a hospital consultant would be very late 40s (assuming that you pass all your exams, and get in first time - by no means easy).
Last edited by ecolier; 1 month ago
0
reply
Agitha
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by ecolier)
Presumably as someone who's in their later years (in terms of their career life) they would be:
- rooted to a particular region, hard to move round (and junior doctor training requires moving around). This is probably the main reason
- as you said, working tough, unsocial hours is not easy for someone older
- earning potentially less than other people in your age group (high £20k - low £30k as an FY1 in your 40s is not easy to take)
- being "bossed around" by people who may be younger than you
- tougher to pass post-grad exams (potentially)
- still a long road ahead of you as an FY1 - assuming that you're an FY1 as a 40 year old, the youngest you'd be a hospital consultant would be very late 40s (assuming that you pass all your exams, and get in first time - by no means easy).
Thank you. Nothing I hadn't already considered and acknowledged as an acceptable (and, dare I say it, welcome) challenge. Which is fortuitous, considering I am a mid-30s GEM applicant.

- I am more than happy to move around the country;
- I am used to working silly hours, nights, overtime and weekends;
- I can handle destitution (I remember how to cook Super Noodles!);
- I am inspired by and learn a great deal from the SpRs and consultants I work with, many of whom are younger than me. When shadowing in clinic, on wards and in ED during traumas, respective age is not something I'm ever conscious of;
- I genuinely believe my academic ability and study capacity have increased with age (let's hope I don't peak too soon!);
- and I am not motivated by the "goal" of achieving consultant status.
Last edited by Agitha; 1 month ago
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by Agitha)
Thank you. Nothing I hadn't already considered and acknowledged as an acceptable (and, dare I say it, welcome) challenge. Which is fortuitous, considering I am a mid-30s GEM applicant.

- I am more than happy to move around the country;
- I am used to working silly hours, nights, overtime and weekends;
- I can handle destitution (I remember how to cook Super Noodles!);
- I am inspired by and learn a great deal from the SpRs and consultants I work with, many of whom are younger than me. When shadowing in clinic, on wards and in ED during traumas, respective age is not something I'm ever conscious of;
- I genuinely believe my academic ability and study capacity have increased with age (let's hope I don't peak too soon!);
- and I am not motivated by the "goal" of achieving consultant status.
That is excellent, and I very much do think that is very inspiring - however you must know that not everyone is like you!

One of the reasons why most grads will eventually specialise in GP - it negates a few of the disadvantages that I mentioned:
- a "more mature" specialty
- shortest training pathway
- less competitive, hence (relatively) easier to get to stay at the same region

Some students, even in their 20s, find that they are already "rooted" to a region because they have a family. And of course, with a young family it will be harder to arrange leave etc. especially around term breaks because they tend to be competitive (and as a junior doctor your leave is limited).
Last edited by ecolier; 1 month ago
0
reply
Agitha
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by ecolier)
That is excellent, and I very much do think that is very inspiring - however you must know that not everyone is like you!

One of the reasons why most grads will eventually specialise in GP - it negates a few of the disadvantages that I mentioned:
- a "more mature" specialty
- shortest training pathway
- less competitive, hence (relatively) easier to get to stay at the same region

Some students, even in their 20s, find that they are already "rooted" to a region because they have a family. And of course, with a young family it will be harder to arrange leave etc. especially around term breaks because they tend to be competitive (and as a junior doctor your leave is limited).
I am aware that during the course of my studies my views on various specialties will change as I gain experience of and learn more about them, however... unfortunately for my future tiredness levels and hope for a work/life balance, so far the area which has been most inspiring to me has been emergency medicine...! I have been peripherally involved in acute medicine via my work in blood bank at a major trauma centre (I am an associate practitioner in haematology), and have been lucky enough to be invited to regularly shadow in various clinical areas, including but not limited to resus. I was almost instantly struck by the focused, calm efficiency, the teamwork of resus; everyone knowing what their role is, and the communication - wow, the communication. It inspired me, the way this team of medics communicate with each other so effectively, with such clarity, in such a high pressure, high stakes situation whilst acutely assessing and attempting to stablise a critically injured patient. It's creating a calmness and order out of what could so easily be utter chaos. It's...elegance. Witnessing this really does instil in me a pride in being part of humanity, seeing what we humans can do. I wish to be a part of that, if I can.

I've yet to shadow during a trauma where the patient didn't make it as far as CT, however not all have had favourable outcomes. Maybe seeing the, sadly not uncommon, situation wherein a patient cannot be stablised may change my (perhaps currently rather naive) views of the whole scene. Or maybe not...in which case, I'm going to be very fulfilled, but rather knackered for the rest of my working life!
Last edited by Agitha; 1 month ago
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#13
Report 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by Agitha)
I am aware that during the course of my studies my views on various specialties will change as I gain experience of and learn more about them, however... unfortunately for my future tiredness levels and hope for a work/life balance, so far the area which has been most inspiring to me has been emergency medicine...! I have been peripherally involved in acute medicine via my work in blood bank at a major trauma centre (I am an associate practitioner in haematology), and have been lucky enough to be invited to regularly shadow in various clinical areas, including but not limited to resus. I was almost instantly struck by the focused, calm efficiency, the teamwork of resus; everyone knowing what their role is, and the communication - wow, the communication. It inspired me, the way this team of medics communicate with each other so effectively, with such clarity, in such a high pressure, high stakes situation whilst acutely assessing and attempting to stablise a critically injured patient. It's almost creating calmness and order out of what could so easily be utter chaos. It's..elegance. Witnessing this really does instil in me a pride in being part of humanity, seeing what we humans can do. I wish to be a part of that, if I can.

I've yet to shadow during a trauma where the patient didn't make it as far as CT, however not all have had favourable outcomes. Maybe seeing the, sadly not uncommon, situation wherein a patient cannot be stablised may change my (perhaps currently rather naive) views of the whole scene. Or maybe not...in which case, I'm going to be very fulfilled, but rather knackered for the rest of my working life!
:goodluck:
0
reply
Agitha
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by ecolier)
:goodluck:
Haha thanks. I'm aware I'm going to need it!
0
reply
Effyd123
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
ye i'm in similar situation.... I'm 23 but I'm rooted to my area (got a kid).

Lets wait and see if I get in anywhere....

The one thing I've noticed so far is that the system is definitely very heavily geared towards school leavers. Lets hope that doesn't trip me up...
0
reply
Incidentaloma
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
(Original post by ecolier)
That is excellent, and I very much do think that is very inspiring - however you must know that not everyone is like you!

One of the reasons why most grads will eventually specialise in GP - it negates a few of the disadvantages that I mentioned:
- a "more mature" specialty
- shortest training pathway
- less competitive, hence (relatively) easier to get to stay at the same region

Some students, even in their 20s, find that they are already "rooted" to a region because they have a family. And of course, with a young family it will be harder to arrange leave etc. especially around term breaks because they tend to be competitive (and as a junior doctor your leave is limited).
This is the case for me. If I get in this year, I'll be 39 when I start FY1. I'm almost positive I'm going to end up in psychiatry, mostly because of my career to date (years teaching in CAMHS and learning disability settings and a relevant MA/PhD), but also because it looks like it will be kinder to my joints and my sleep schedule. I'm just lucky that the specialty that fits best with my prior experience and interests also happens to be one that doesn't make the toughest demands on middle-aged arthritic people. 😋
2
reply
baran_borislaw
Badges: 4
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
im 23 and no, if your family supports you it is not too old/late (or its going to be your 2nd uni it doesnt matter NOT AT ALL people do it in their 30-40s it merely depends on your will you will never live your life again JUST DO IT !)
Last edited by baran_borislaw; 1 month ago
0
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#18
Report 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by Advisor2)
No, 21 is young to be starting medicine and when you compare age at which you start medicine in America for example, where you have to do premed, 21 is probably quite young. There are many people on UK medicine courses who have taken 1 or 2 gap years, spent time working and saving or travelling, and are better off because of this. Incredibly fortunate to have studied medicine after a first degree, however there are a few things I wish I knew prior to my second degree. Hope sharing these thoughts will be beneficial to all who read:

1) There are many different routes into medicine
a) if you do not have science A levels - you can apply to a foundation course in which you spend year 0 attaining a basic level of your sciences - for those who do not have science A level look into this. You could have a completely different career prior to medicine, and your chances of becoming a doctor are not hindered by not having the science A levels that the majority of your cohort will have.

b) if you do have science A levels - you can apply at the age of 18 to get into medicine, however this is an incredibly young age in the larger scheme of things. If you know for definite that you want to pursue medicine at this age, go for it, however if this is not the case, medicine can be explored at a later age. Quite a lot of students who started at the age of 18, 19, 20 years, intercalate after the first clinical year or 3rd year of a 5 year course to pursue a one year BSc in a medically related field, but also to have a break. In your late teens and early 20s you are still developing physically, socially and personally, and you are still learning a lot of life lessons. As medicine is a full time course during which you are in 5 days a week, it can be hard to find a balance, especially if you do not have a real appreciation for the immense amount of studying you have to do in pre clinical years, and how you have to continue to review anatomy, physiology, molecular biology and so on in addition to symptoms, investigations, treatment and complications of not treating vs treating in your later clinical years. I enjoy this, but burnout is evident in some students who have gone straight from A levels to medicine, so do not be afraid to take a year out to work, to travel, to start a business or do a combination of things related to or unrelated to medicine - medicine if a lifelong vocation - your late teens/early 20s are finite. If you do decide to work, look into entry level positions based in hospitals so you are exposed to clinical environment.

c) transfer schemes - many individuals will be rejected from medicine in the UK - it is a competitive application process - and think applying to another undergraduate course in which a transfer into the 3rd year of medicine is possible, is their best option. Wish this was spoken about more often, but these transfer schemes are incredibly competitive, more so than undergrad of grad entry medicine. Do not place all of your hopes of getting onto a medicine course in these transfer schemes. There are quite a view undergraduate biomedical sciences or medicinal sciences course that offer this, however if you do not get one of the 15 or so transfer places, then you've studied towards a degree that you do not really want. Moreover, graduate prospects after completing such degree may be poor unless you go onto get a masters or phd in that field. By the time you've done this, you have spent many years, much effort and a lot of money (accommodation fees, other course fees etc.) on a pathway related to medicine, but not an actual degree in medicine that will allow you to practice clinically.
If you do want to do a degree prior to medicine, that is related and will give an advantage when pursuing medicine, then I would suggest the following:
- Pharmacy - After registration, you can choose to remain a pharmacist or locum as a pharmacist whilst pursuing a degree in medicine. This is particularly helpful if you are a graduate of a 5 year course, as though you receive a maintenance loan, you do not receive a tuition fee loan if you have a first degree. Medical school is expensive - there is travel to placements that you must consider (transport or fuel and car maintenance if you drive, clothing, equipment, rent fees, groceries and on top of that, fees related to having a social life e.g. society memberships, dinners, days out, purchasing gifts etc. Having a first degree, which is related to medicine and in which you can actually get a job after with, is incredible beneficial. On top of this, while it will be a full time degree, you are likely to have more time to explore different interests at university in you late teens/early 20s, than you would on a medicine course.
-Anatomy - anatomy teaching varies from med school to med school. Having a first degree in anatomy in incredibly beneficial, and while job availability may not be as vast as what is available for pharmacy, you will have a focussed and solid grounding in anatomy which is needed throughout your career in medicine, but particularly for your pre clinical years of medicine.
-Nursing - for the same reasons to those given for pharmacy
-Dentistry - particularly if you are interested in MaxFax - you'll be superb when it comes to head and neck conditions, and again you can locum, however do your research as locum opportunities are likely only available after 2 years of post-degree training towards registration.
-Psychology - these graduate tend to be great at communicating with patients and have very good sift skills - again, there is the opportunity to become a clinical psychologist, but make sure your degree is accredited with the relevant organisation to allow pursuing clinical psychology training
-Philosophy - these graduate again are great communicators, and also have a firm foundation in ethics, including medical ethics. Not entirely sure what the job prospects are and whether it will be easy to find a job in this field while studying towards a second degree in medicine.
-Physiotherapy - good job prospects and helps with learning related to MSK system
-Occupational therapy - good job prospects and help with learning related to MSK system
-Audiology - make sure degree is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council or relevant organisation
-Optometry - make sure degree is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council or relevant organisation
-OPD - operating department practice - particularly if you are interested in surgery - these are the amazing individual that prepare theatre for operation, ensure equipment is sterile and are constantly communicating with surgeons throughout each surgery - have a look into this and again make sure degree in accredited by the relevant organisation
-Radiotherapy
-Radiology
-Anthropology

d) graduate entry - for graduate entry medicine, the main entry exams you have to take are GAMSAT and UKCAT- with chemistry and biology as A levels it will take around 6 months to bring all sciences (biology, chemistry and physics) to the level required for the GAMSAT. It all depends on how long it takes you to understand a concept, so allocate longer or shorter to revision depending on your learning style, however this is just for section 3 of the GAMSAT. Section 1 tests you reasoning skills and section 2 tests your written communication (you have to write 2 essays in 1 hr). Graduates with communication based degrees such as psychology tend to find section 2 more manageable. These entry exams do cost money - cannot remember exact amount but around £200 or £300. If you do well enough, you can use you score for 2 years, or 2 application cycles - again check as things may have changed. Applying as a graduate will likely involve applying to a mix of graduate and undergraduate courses. Especially if you get onto an undergraduate course, make sure you have the means to pay for you tuition fee (saved up from previous employment and/or able to work on weekends, or have financial support from family). Some medical schools require graduates to sit the UKCAT SJT in addition to the GAMSAT, and others will want the full UKCAT only -again research this.

e) very rarely, some medical school may have spaces available in clearing - this is very rare, but if the opportunity presents, take it


2) Clinical thinking; it is helpful to think of each condition you come across in term of symptoms (physical and mental), investigations, treatment and prognosis - this thought process will help you throughout, particularly in the later years of medicine.

3) Travel - already mentioned but this can be incredibly expensive. Think about the university you apply too, whether hospitals are local and easy to get to on transport. If hospitals are 30 or more minute drives away from the main university campus, consider doing you practical and theory driving tests before starting medicine. Can be done throughout the earlier years of medicine but finding time to do so is more difficult.

4) Socialising - there is time to do - look at what societies are on offer - smaller universities will not have many societies, larger universities will have a vast range of societies - sports, library, food facilities etc. tend to be better at larger universities. They also offer more opportunity to meet people from various course backgrounds. Some of my very good friends are from very different course backgrounds, and it is refreshing to have friends both inside and outside of the medical course.

5) Location in the UK - compare average rent prices in the UK - London will be most expensive, however you benefit from excellent transport links and can pretty much get anywhere you want to within the hour. Up north or further down south, cheaper but not as great transport links.


Again - hope this helps all who read. Medicine is an amazing degree and sets you up for a great clinical career, but be clear on the options/routes available to you and what pursuing each pathway involves. It's your life, you and your family's hard earned money contributing to costs of pursuing medicine and your time and effort - use these resources well so that you are choosing the best pathway for yourself and ultimately the patients you will be caring for!
Oh good Lord, I don't even know where to begin with this...
0
reply
gghgggd5ht
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#19
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#19
(Original post by Advisor2)
No, 21 is young to be starting medicine and when you compare age at which you start medicine in America for example, where you have to do premed, 21 is probably quite young. There are many people on UK medicine courses who have taken 1 or 2 gap years, spent time working and saving or travelling, and are better off because of this. Incredibly fortunate to have studied medicine after a first degree, however there are a few things I wish I knew prior to my second degree. Hope sharing these thoughts will be beneficial to all who read:

1) There are many different routes into medicine
a) if you do not have science A levels - you can apply to a foundation course in which you spend year 0 attaining a basic level of your sciences - for those who do not have science A level look into this. You could have a completely different career prior to medicine, and your chances of becoming a doctor are not hindered by not having the science A levels that the majority of your cohort will have.

b) if you do have science A levels - you can apply at the age of 18 to get into medicine, however this is an incredibly young age in the larger scheme of things. If you know for definite that you want to pursue medicine at this age, go for it, however if this is not the case, medicine can be explored at a later age. Quite a lot of students who started at the age of 18, 19, 20 years, intercalate after the first clinical year or 3rd year of a 5 year course to pursue a one year BSc in a medically related field, but also to have a break. In your late teens and early 20s you are still developing physically, socially and personally, and you are still learning a lot of life lessons. As medicine is a full time course during which you are in 5 days a week, it can be hard to find a balance, especially if you do not have a real appreciation for the immense amount of studying you have to do in pre clinical years, and how you have to continue to review anatomy, physiology, molecular biology and so on in addition to symptoms, investigations, treatment and complications of not treating vs treating in your later clinical years. I enjoy this, but burnout is evident in some students who have gone straight from A levels to medicine, so do not be afraid to take a year out to work, to travel, to start a business or do a combination of things related to or unrelated to medicine - medicine if a lifelong vocation - your late teens/early 20s are finite. If you do decide to work, look into entry level positions based in hospitals so you are exposed to clinical environment.

c) transfer schemes - many individuals will be rejected from medicine in the UK - it is a competitive application process - and think applying to another undergraduate course in which a transfer into the 3rd year of medicine is possible, is their best option. Wish this was spoken about more often, but these transfer schemes are incredibly competitive, more so than undergrad of grad entry medicine. Do not place all of your hopes of getting onto a medicine course in these transfer schemes. There are quite a view undergraduate biomedical sciences or medicinal sciences course that offer this, however if you do not get one of the 15 or so transfer places, then you've studied towards a degree that you do not really want. Moreover, graduate prospects after completing such degree may be poor unless you go onto get a masters or phd in that field. By the time you've done this, you have spent many years, much effort and a lot of money (accommodation fees, other course fees etc.) on a pathway related to medicine, but not an actual degree in medicine that will allow you to practice clinically.
If you do want to do a degree prior to medicine, that is related and will give an advantage when pursuing medicine, then I would suggest the following:
- Pharmacy - After registration, you can choose to remain a pharmacist or locum as a pharmacist whilst pursuing a degree in medicine. This is particularly helpful if you are a graduate of a 5 year course, as though you receive a maintenance loan, you do not receive a tuition fee loan if you have a first degree. Medical school is expensive - there is travel to placements that you must consider (transport or fuel and car maintenance if you drive, clothing, equipment, rent fees, groceries and on top of that, fees related to having a social life e.g. society memberships, dinners, days out, purchasing gifts etc. Having a first degree, which is related to medicine and in which you can actually get a job after with, is incredible beneficial. On top of this, while it will be a full time degree, you are likely to have more time to explore different interests at university in you late teens/early 20s, than you would on a medicine course.
-Anatomy - anatomy teaching varies from med school to med school. Having a first degree in anatomy in incredibly beneficial, and while job availability may not be as vast as what is available for pharmacy, you will have a focussed and solid grounding in anatomy which is needed throughout your career in medicine, but particularly for your pre clinical years of medicine.
-Nursing - for the same reasons to those given for pharmacy
-Dentistry - particularly if you are interested in MaxFax - you'll be superb when it comes to head and neck conditions, and again you can locum, however do your research as locum opportunities are likely only available after 2 years of post-degree training towards registration.
-Psychology - these graduate tend to be great at communicating with patients and have very good sift skills - again, there is the opportunity to become a clinical psychologist, but make sure your degree is accredited with the relevant organisation to allow pursuing clinical psychology training
-Philosophy - these graduate again are great communicators, and also have a firm foundation in ethics, including medical ethics. Not entirely sure what the job prospects are and whether it will be easy to find a job in this field while studying towards a second degree in medicine.
-Physiotherapy - good job prospects and helps with learning related to MSK system
-Occupational therapy - good job prospects and help with learning related to MSK system
-Audiology - make sure degree is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council or relevant organisation
-Optometry - make sure degree is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council or relevant organisation
-OPD - operating department practice - particularly if you are interested in surgery - these are the amazing individual that prepare theatre for operation, ensure equipment is sterile and are constantly communicating with surgeons throughout each surgery - have a look into this and again make sure degree in accredited by the relevant organisation
-Radiotherapy
-Radiology
-Anthropology

d) graduate entry - for graduate entry medicine, the main entry exams you have to take are GAMSAT and UKCAT- with chemistry and biology as A levels it will take around 6 months to bring all sciences (biology, chemistry and physics) to the level required for the GAMSAT. It all depends on how long it takes you to understand a concept, so allocate longer or shorter to revision depending on your learning style, however this is just for section 3 of the GAMSAT. Section 1 tests you reasoning skills and section 2 tests your written communication (you have to write 2 essays in 1 hr). Graduates with communication based degrees such as psychology tend to find section 2 more manageable. These entry exams do cost money - cannot remember exact amount but around £200 or £300. If you do well enough, you can use you score for 2 years, or 2 application cycles - again check as things may have changed. Applying as a graduate will likely involve applying to a mix of graduate and undergraduate courses. Especially if you get onto an undergraduate course, make sure you have the means to pay for you tuition fee (saved up from previous employment and/or able to work on weekends, or have financial support from family). Some medical schools require graduates to sit the UKCAT SJT in addition to the GAMSAT, and others will want the full UKCAT only -again research this.

e) very rarely, some medical school may have spaces available in clearing - this is very rare, but if the opportunity presents, take it


2) Clinical thinking; it is helpful to think of each condition you come across in term of symptoms (physical and mental), investigations, treatment and prognosis - this thought process will help you throughout, particularly in the later years of medicine.

3) Travel - already mentioned but this can be incredibly expensive. Think about the university you apply too, whether hospitals are local and easy to get to on transport. If hospitals are 30 or more minute drives away from the main university campus, consider doing you practical and theory driving tests before starting medicine. Can be done throughout the earlier years of medicine but finding time to do so is more difficult.

4) Socialising - there is time to do - look at what societies are on offer - smaller universities will not have many societies, larger universities will have a vast range of societies - sports, library, food facilities etc. tend to be better at larger universities. They also offer more opportunity to meet people from various course backgrounds. Some of my very good friends are from very different course backgrounds, and it is refreshing to have friends both inside and outside of the medical course.

5) Location in the UK - compare average rent prices in the UK - London will be most expensive, however you benefit from excellent transport links and can pretty much get anywhere you want to within the hour. Up north or further down south, cheaper but not as great transport links.


Again - hope this helps all who read. Medicine is an amazing degree and sets you up for a great clinical career, but be clear on the options/routes available to you and what pursuing each pathway involves. It's your life, you and your family's hard earned money contributing to costs of pursuing medicine and your time and effort - use these resources well so that you are choosing the best pathway for yourself and ultimately the patients you will be caring for!
Great advice. I’ll definitely take all that into account before I reapply. Cheers
0
reply
ghostbeansgirl
Badges: 7
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#20
Report 1 month ago
#20
My mum went back to uni at age 47, with 4 kids, to become an ODP. 21 is absolutely not too old, in fact I think waiting a bit gives you a better understanding of what you actually want to do. But definitely do a bit of research into medicine apprenticeships! Many are shaping up to be wayyy more beneficial than the actual uni courses.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

When did you submit your Ucas application if you applied to go to university this year?

September 2021 (9)
6.38%
October 2021 (70)
49.65%
November 2021 (14)
9.93%
December 2021 (21)
14.89%
January 2021 (12)
8.51%
I still haven't submitted it yet! (12)
8.51%
Something else (3)
2.13%

Watched Threads

View All