(English Lit) Or should I Continue with this revision?

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Idc123
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Hello, I’m aiming for a Grade 9 in literature. The way I’m revising right now is that:
1) I give my ideas the structure of an essay. So, I don’t ‘annotate’, I write in as much detail as someone would in exams, and memorise them. This ends up being 2 goes long for each idea.
2) I make sure to go over most of the themes in each scene. For instance, in Act 1 Scene 1 alone, I managed to memorise 7 ideas of it (with the structure of an essay, which ends up being 2 pages long, so 2 x 7 = *14 pages* to for Act 1 Scene 1 alone)


My biggest worry is that, because I would’ve memorised so much, in exams my brain will go blank if the exam question isn’t something I had done on my strenuous revision. 14 pages memorised per scene, there are 5 scenes per Act (on average), 14 x 5 = 70 pages memorised. There are 5 scenes, 70 x 5 = *350 PAGES* memorised for Romeo and Juliet as a whole.

I know this is a lot, but also as long as I memorise things and don’t stress if the exam question isn’t on something I revised, it should all be fine. Nevertheless, please tell me what you think as I’m panicking with my revision method.

If you don’t recommend this, please do offer an alternative to my revision, it would mean a lot. I really want a 9
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Idc123
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Oh also, I have ADHD. A symptom is that, counterintuitively, I tend to become hyper focused, and so write a lot in exams. In my November mocks I didn’t have time to finish my essay on A Christmas Carol
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Idc123
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ellabean1673
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(Original post by Idc123)
Hello, I’m aiming for a Grade 9 in literature. The way I’m revising right now is that:
1) I give my ideas the structure of an essay. So, I don’t ‘annotate’, I write in as much detail as someone would in exams, and memorise them. This ends up being 2 goes long for each idea.
2) I make sure to go over most of the themes in each scene. For instance, in Act 1 Scene 1 alone, I managed to memorise 7 ideas of it (with the structure of an essay, which ends up being 2 pages long, so 2 x 7 = *14 pages* to for Act 1 Scene 1 alone)


My biggest worry is that, because I would’ve memorised so much, in exams my brain will go blank if the exam question isn’t something I had done on my strenuous revision. 14 pages memorised per scene, there are 5 scenes per Act (on average), 14 x 5 = 70 pages memorised. There are 5 scenes, 70 x 5 = *350 PAGES* memorised for Romeo and Juliet as a whole.

I know this is a lot, but also as long as I memorise things and don’t stress if the exam question isn’t on something I revised, it should all be fine. Nevertheless, please tell me what you think as I’m panicking with my revision method.

If you don’t recommend this, please do offer an alternative to my revision, it would mean a lot. I really want a 9
hi, I’m doing AQA eng lit atm and I’m studying R&J, Jekyll and Hyde, and poetry (our school cut the modern text). Firstly, how have you not burnt out ?!! This is so much work just for one part of one subject, i dont know if you do this for every subject but if you do... eek. For eng lit specifically, I’d recommend remembering that your grade will be made up of multiple parts (at least for mine it is because we have the 3 studies) so therefore separate out your revision into the necessary parts needed. For example, I don’t spend long on Jekyll and Hyde because i know it the best, but for this mocks I’ve been going over quotes in general because my memories awful. I assume you probably do this, but i just thought I’d say it anyway.

For Shakespeare specifically, remember there will only be a limited number of themes. For example, love, hate, family, fate etc, and you will most likely be asked about one of these themes in your exam. Going through every single act isn’t necessary, as some acts will have nothing that useful in. To get 30/30 (this is at least what my question will be, again apologies if you don’t do AQA) you need to have good analysis skills, but also just a good overview of the play in general, which you probably do if you’ve studied in such depth already. So, what I personally do, is for each character, find quotes from all over the play which represent each them. For example, I have 1 quote on Romeo being romantic, 1 on his instability, one on his hot-headed-ness.For the summer exams, I’ll make the effort to find more quotes, but I’m currently too burnt out to find anymore oops. Then, I either create a flash card or a mindmap for each relevant character & each theme, and write the quotes I’ll need. Or, to see what I know, i brain dump.

Finally, practice essays !!! Find old questions online or ask your teacher and time yourself to an essay. If you struggle with hyper-fixation, set specific time limits for each paragraph so you don’t spend too much time on something that you don’t need to. If you’re doing all this work to annotate something already, apply your knowledge! There’s only a limited number of questions they can ask you, but they’ll probably just reword the questions. So, use this to your advantage and become really familiar with the range of questions they could offer you. Then give your essays into your teacher and get them to give you feedback. Looking through markschemes also helps. If you’re worrying you might be given a question you haven’t revised for, doing an old question can help you realise you probably know a lot

As long as you have the good essay structure, you know terminology and quote from elsewhere in the play, can give context, and alternate opinions, you’ll be fine

hope this helped!
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Idc123
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#5
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(Original post by ellabean1673)
hi, I’m doing AQA eng lit atm and I’m studying R&J, Jekyll and Hyde, and poetry (our school cut the modern text). Firstly, how have you not burnt out ?!! This is so much work just for one part of one subject, i dont know if you do this for every subject but if you do... eek. For eng lit specifically, I’d recommend remembering that your grade will be made up of multiple parts (at least for mine it is because we have the 3 studies) so therefore separate out your revision into the necessary parts needed. For example, I don’t spend long on Jekyll and Hyde because i know it the best, but for this mocks I’ve been going over quotes in general because my memories awful. I assume you probably do this, but i just thought I’d say it anyway.

For Shakespeare specifically, remember there will only be a limited number of themes. For example, love, hate, family, fate etc, and you will most likely be asked about one of these themes in your exam. Going through every single act isn’t necessary, as some acts will have nothing that useful in. To get 30/30 (this is at least what my question will be, again apologies if you don’t do AQA) you need to have good analysis skills, but also just a good overview of the play in general, which you probably do if you’ve studied in such depth already. So, what I personally do, is for each character, find quotes from all over the play which represent each them. For example, I have 1 quote on Romeo being romantic, 1 on his instability, one on his hot-headed-ness.For the summer exams, I’ll make the effort to find more quotes, but I’m currently too burnt out to find anymore oops. Then, I either create a flash card or a mindmap for each relevant character & each theme, and write the quotes I’ll need. Or, to see what I know, i brain dump.

Finally, practice essays !!! Find old questions online or ask your teacher and time yourself to an essay. If you struggle with hyper-fixation, set specific time limits for each paragraph so you don’t spend too much time on something that you don’t need to. If you’re doing all this work to annotate something already, apply your knowledge! There’s only a limited number of questions they can ask you, but they’ll probably just reword the questions. So, use this to your advantage and become really familiar with the range of questions they could offer you. Then give your essays into your teacher and get them to give you feedback. Looking through markschemes also helps. If you’re worrying you might be given a question you haven’t revised for, doing an old question can help you realise you probably know a lot

As long as you have the good essay structure, you know terminology and quote from elsewhere in the play, can give context, and alternate opinions, you’ll be fine

hope this helped!
Thank you so much!! This really means a lot
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