Training for one-arm pushups

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justlearning1469
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#1
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#1
How do I even do one-arm pushups? I can only go around halfway and then I have to push up or fall.

For context, I can do 12 proper pushups for 2 sets. Holding forearm plank for 3 minutes at best.
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Kyri
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I think you first need to be able to do more than 12 push ups in a row before you can do a one arm push up. Also you'll need to train some other variations which gradually build in difficulty towards the one arm push up, particularly the diamond push up to get triceps stronger, and the archer push up where one arm stays straight. You'll really struggle to jump straight from normal pushups to the one arm push up. You should be able to find things online which will help you if you google search "one arm push up progressions".

Also, to keep expectations realistic, it took me a year of specifically training for the one arm pushup to achieve it, although your own bodyweight will affect how easy or hard it will be for you.
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justlearning1469
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(Original post by Kyri)
I think you first need to be able to do more than 12 push ups in a row before you can do a one arm push up. Also you'll need to train some other variations which gradually build in difficulty towards the one arm push up, particularly the diamond push up to get triceps stronger, and the archer push up where one arm stays straight. You'll really struggle to jump straight from normal pushups to the one arm push up. You should be able to find things online which will help you if you google search "one arm push up progressions".

Also, to keep expectations realistic, it took me a year of specifically training for the one arm pushup to achieve it, although your own bodyweight will affect how easy or hard it will be for you.
'I think you first need to be able to do more than 12 push ups in a row before you can do a one arm push up.'
Tried it just now. Just barely was able to do one 1-arm push up, with feet apart. And that was with my dominant arm. So yes you could do, but only barely. And I meant 2 sets of 12 proper pushups, not an all-out go of one set.

'Also you'll need to train some other variations which gradually build in difficulty towards the one arm push up, particularly the diamond push up to get triceps stronger, and the archer push up where one arm stays straight.'
What about the elevated one-arm pushup? I can just about handle 2 of those, maybe 3 if I really push myself.
And the pseudo-planche pushup.

'You'll really struggle to jump straight from normal pushups to the one arm push up.'
I tried that. Took like 3 tries to do a single 1-arm pushup from my base strength.

'Also, to keep expectations realistic, it took me a year of specifically training for the one arm pushup to achieve it, although your own bodyweight will affect how easy or hard it will be for you.'
More training. I think I'd need more training in order to be able to consistently do at least one 1-arm pushup. My upper body is weaker than my lower body, so this should give me some training.
Also, for your training, where did you start from?
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Kyri
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You already got the one arm push up... nice! Even if it was a grind, it will really help that you sort of already taught you body the movement pattern for it. To get better at it, I'd still suggest training other variations to get stronger, otherwise it's kind of like using your one rep max bench press to get stronger at bench press. The variations you mentioned would all help. Anything that's harder than normal push ups, but not as a hard as a one arm push up will help. It's the equivalent of changing the weight on the bar to work in different rep ranges. Just for me, diamond push ups and archer push ups were the most helpful.

As for where I started from, I had already been doing strength training in the gym for 5 years so had a decent base, but gyms closed because of covid so went all in with calisthenics for a while. Made it my goal to achieve one arm push ups, hand stand push ups, pistol squat, muscle up, and one arm pull up. Managed to get them all except one arm pull up. Now that one is very hard!
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miser
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You need to increase the resistance so that you develop the strength to do one arm push ups. A one arm push up is twice the weight of a normal push up, so it's a big difference.

Do more difficult push up variations like incline push ups, or imbalanced push ups where you do most of the weight on one arm and only assist with the other arm (then switch).

If you develop more strength you'll be able to do one arm push ups.
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justlearning1469
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(Original post by miser)
You need to increase the resistance so that you develop the strength to do one arm push ups. A one arm push up is twice the weight of a normal push up, so it's a big difference.

Do more difficult push up variations like incline push ups, or imbalanced push ups where you do most of the weight on one arm and only assist with the other arm (then switch).

If you develop more strength you'll be able to do one arm push ups.
'You need to increase the resistance so that you develop the strength to do one arm push ups.'
Quite true. Though before this I actually managed to barely churn out one 1-arm pushup on my dominant arm before collapsing to the floor. But still, developing strength is key.

'A one arm push up is twice the weight of a normal push up, so it's a big difference.'
More like 2.25x the weight because you have to support your other arm.

'Do more difficult push up variations like incline push ups, or imbalanced push ups where you do most of the weight on one arm and only assist with the other arm (then switch).'
Thanks.

'If you develop more strength you'll be able to do one arm push ups.'
Even if it's only 1 of them. At least I would know that I can do it. I tried and got within 2 inches of the floor then almost collapsed. Then I basically pushed with all my might. Barely managed to lock that arm and then I collapsed on the floor. And that is after a solid warm-up with free time.
So you can say now it's my 1-rep max (barely).

How long does it take to train to do a one-arm pushup?
I would try to get at least 1 of these on both arms first.
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justlearning1469
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#7
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(Original post by Kyri)
You already got the one arm push up... nice! Even if it was a grind, it will really help that you sort of already taught you body the movement pattern for it. To get better at it, I'd still suggest training other variations to get stronger, otherwise it's kind of like using your one rep max bench press to get stronger at bench press. The variations you mentioned would all help. Anything that's harder than normal push ups, but not as a hard as a one arm push up will help. It's the equivalent of changing the weight on the bar to work in different rep ranges. Just for me, diamond push ups and archer push ups were the most helpful.

As for where I started from, I had already been doing strength training in the gym for 5 years so had a decent base, but gyms closed because of covid so went all in with calisthenics for a while. Made it my goal to achieve one arm push ups, hand stand push ups, pistol squat, muscle up, and one arm pull up. Managed to get them all except one arm pull up. Now that one is very hard!
'You already got the one arm push up... nice!'
Felt really energetic that day so I decided to have a go at that 1-arm pushup. Barely, to like 1-2 inches off the floor, with like only my stronger arm, with abs and legs burning. Took like 6 seconds to do. And that was in front of the girls who like me. After that I was done.

So yes, I did, just barely.

'Even if it was a grind, it will really help that you sort of already taught you body the movement pattern for it.'
True, I collapsed on the ground mid-way for once because I lost my balance. Second time I collapsed when pushing up. Third time, barely after locking 1 rep. Then that arm was sore for a while.

'To get better at it, I'd still suggest training other variations to get stronger, otherwise it's kind of like using your one rep max bench press to get stronger at bench press.'
Agreed. Probably attempt at least 12 of a harder variation for 2 sets before trying the 1-arm pushup again.

'Just for me, diamond push ups and archer push ups were the most helpful.'
True. Though for me my chest is somewhat weak, and my back too. Any tips for home gym training? I don't even have a pull-up bar, just 2 light dumbbells and a space for me to work with.

'As for where I started from, I had already been doing strength training in the gym for 5 years so had a decent base, but gyms closed because of covid so went all in with calisthenics for a while.'
I've never even been to the gym before. Only exercised 1-2 times a week until COVID-19 hit.

'Made it my goal to achieve one arm push ups, hand stand push ups, pistol squat, muscle up, and one arm pull up.'
I can do half a dozen weighted pistol squats. Still can't do any of the variations of the pistol squat. I think I'll build up to 12 weighted pistol squats first.
For hand-stand, I can do it with assistance of a wall, but can't fully go down for push-up.
For pull-up, if I am forced to do pull-ups then I can maybe do 1 but that's it. Let alone one-arm pull up.

Any tips for pull-up training at home?
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Kyri
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(Original post by justlearning1469)
True. Though for me my chest is somewhat weak, and my back too. Any tips for home gym training? I don't even have a pull-up bar, just 2 light dumbbells and a space for me to work with

Any tips for pull-up training at home?
To be honest, light dumbbells are pretty crap for chest training. Ordinarily, dumbbell bench press can be used as a staple for progressive overload and build chest muscle and strength, but if these light dumbbells are a weight you can biceps curl, then they're too light to challenge your chest sufficiently. You could do flyes (arms kept straight) with them I suppose, but if you're serious about training at home, I'd recommend getting a set of adjustable dumbbells with a range of weight plates, so you can gradually increase the amount you can handle. Progressive overload is the key to getting bigger and stronger.

As for pull up training, do you already have a pull up bar at home? You can start with negatives, as in, stand up on a chair and start at the top of the pull up and control the descent downwards. That will build strength towards being able to pull yourself up. If it's a pull up bar that hangs on the door frame, I really advise against jumping to get to the top, as it might knock the bar off the door frame. Jumping would usually be okay on a fixed pull up bar.
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justlearning1469
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#9
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(Original post by Kyri)
To be honest, light dumbbells are pretty crap for chest training. Ordinarily, dumbbell bench press can be used as a staple for progressive overload and build chest muscle and strength, but if these light dumbbells are a weight you can biceps curl, then they're too light to challenge your chest sufficiently. You could do flyes (arms kept straight) with them I suppose, but if you're serious about training at home, I'd recommend getting a set of adjustable dumbbells with a range of weight plates, so you can gradually increase the amount you can handle. Progressive overload is the key to getting bigger and stronger.

As for pull up training, do you already have a pull up bar at home? You can start with negatives, as in, stand up on a chair and start at the top of the pull up and control the descent downwards. That will build strength towards being able to pull yourself up. If it's a pull up bar that hangs on the door frame, I really advise against jumping to get to the top, as it might knock the bar off the door frame. Jumping would usually be okay on a fixed pull up bar.
'To be honest, light dumbbells are pretty crap for chest training.'
True, though I basically have nothing else.

'but if these light dumbbells are a weight you can biceps curl, then they're too light to challenge your chest sufficiently.'
I don't even have 2 handles to do dips with. I have a table but I might actually break it if I tried, and plus it's uneven.
Best I might be able to do is decline push ups or 1-leg push ups for chest training.

'You could do flyes (arms kept straight) with them I suppose, but if you're serious about training at home, I'd recommend getting a set of adjustable dumbbells with a range of weight plates, so you can gradually increase the amount you can handle.'
I'll see to it. And also my triceps aren't that strong so maybe I should try bench dips with 1 leg off the ground, straight.
What if I put a dumbbell between my legs while doing push-ups to further increase the weight?

'Progressive overload is the key to getting bigger and stronger.'
Agreed.

'As for pull up training, do you already have a pull up bar at home?'
No.

'That will build strength towards being able to pull yourself up. If it's a pull up bar that hangs on the door frame, I really advise against jumping to get to the top, as it might knock the bar off the door frame. Jumping would usually be okay on a fixed pull up bar.'
Well, I don't even have a pull-up bar.

And what about gym membership? I wonder how would I stack up in comparison to others with my circumstances, and the gym goers (well probably not that well). How many % of people can even do one 1-armed pushup?

And for pushup form, maybe I should attempt to get my chest within 1 cm of the floor before going up, would that be a better idea? For now, I'm going down to 0.5 to 1 inch, so a bit lower for slightly more challenge?

Also, what about plank variations? Push-up to plank for a while? For baseline fitness, 3 minutes of forearm plank isn't too tough. What about forearm plank to clap push up?

And what do you think about my fitness level? 15 right here, a couple of athletic competitions. I don't think I'm too great in the athletics department, although I can do weighted pistol squats and (barely) one-arm pushup.
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Kyri
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Dumbbell between the legs for push ups isn't the best idea. Firstly, the weight is too close to the pivot point (your toes) so won't add much resistance. Also it will probably hit the ground and mess up your form. An easier way to weight push ups is with a weighted vest (I know you probably don't have one), but doing harder push up variations is the easiest way.

You need some kind of pull up bar to train pull ups at home. I'm personally not a fan of door frame pull up bars. I've seen too many videos of them coming off the frame but lots of people use them. I was using a pull up stand, specifically the pull up mate (because it's easy to put away) to do pull ups at home.

Seeing as you'd need to buy a fair bit of equipment to train at home, you may be better off just joining a gym. Don't worry about how you stack up against others. There will be beginners there, and there will be advanced lifters who are strong. Neither of those affect your ability to improve your own strength and physique. How many can do a one arm push up.... I've never seen a casual gym goer do one. It's not common.

Ideally your chest should lightly touch the floor when you do push ups. That's full range of motion, rather than 1 cm of the floor.

I'm not a fan of planks personally. Once you can plank for more than a minute, it's just an exercise in getting you even better at planking for a long time. Plus it's boring.

It's hard for me to comment on your fitness level as I don't know enough about you. I would have thought how well you did in those athletic competitions should be a good indicator.
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justlearning1469
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(Original post by Kyri)
Dumbbell between the legs for push ups isn't the best idea. Firstly, the weight is too close to the pivot point (your toes) so won't add much resistance. Also it will probably hit the ground and mess up your form. An easier way to weight push ups is with a weighted vest (I know you probably don't have one), but doing harder push up variations is the easiest way.

You need some kind of pull up bar to train pull ups at home. I'm personally not a fan of door frame pull up bars. I've seen too many videos of them coming off the frame but lots of people use them. I was using a pull up stand, specifically the pull up mate (because it's easy to put away) to do pull ups at home.

Seeing as you'd need to buy a fair bit of equipment to train at home, you may be better off just joining a gym. Don't worry about how you stack up against others. There will be beginners there, and there will be advanced lifters who are strong. Neither of those affect your ability to improve your own strength and physique. How many can do a one arm push up.... I've never seen a casual gym goer do one. It's not common.

Ideally your chest should lightly touch the floor when you do push ups. That's full range of motion, rather than 1 cm of the floor.

I'm not a fan of planks personally. Once you can plank for more than a minute, it's just an exercise in getting you even better at planking for a long time. Plus it's boring.

It's hard for me to comment on your fitness level as I don't know enough about you. I would have thought how well you did in those athletic competitions should be a good indicator.
'An easier way to weight push ups is with a weighted vest (I know you probably don't have one), but doing harder push up variations is the easiest way.'
I suppose. I still need to reinforce the one-armed pushup. On some days I can't even manage 1 solid rep, though I have managed 1 solid rep before.

'You need some kind of pull up bar to train pull ups at home. I'm personally not a fan of door frame pull up bars. I've seen too many videos of them coming off the frame but lots of people use them. I was using a pull up stand, specifically the pull up mate (because it's easy to put away) to do pull ups at home.'
Don't have it. Any alternative exercises? I do have light dumbbells for running, and ankle weights but that's it.

'Seeing as you'd need to buy a fair bit of equipment to train at home, you may be better off just joining a gym.'
COVID-19? But I'd eventually join a gym.

'Don't worry about how you stack up against others.'
I don't wanna be the guy who can't do a single pull-up. Though at least I can do L-sit for some time, and tuck planche for a short while before I collapse. As well as 1 solid rep of one-arm pushup. One time I did manage 7 pistol squats in a row and then I was already getting sore. For push-ups, 14 pushups for 2 sets is my best.
So in the gym I should be able to do OK-ish. Or am I underestimating/overestimating myself?

'There will be beginners there'
How much of beginners? Only being able to do 5 pushups (which is still
something)?
Don't think I am a beginner but I could be wrong. Intermediate perhaps?

'and there will be advanced lifters who are strong.'
Bench pressing 3x their bodyweight? And the 1000-pound club, I can see that happening for some advanced lifters. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TS1H_LX31mU) 501kg benchpress right there, dang.

'How many can do a one arm push up.... I've never seen a casual gym goer do one. It's not common.'
Well to some extent it depends on what form counts as '1 rep 1-arm pushup'.
If that casual gym goer who is decent sways and puts their legs insanely wide as well as a huge crowd cheering them on then maybe just maybe.
I was surprised by that, I thought some others like me who never even go to the gym or only go there a couple times can do a couple 1-arm pushups.

'Ideally your chest should lightly touch the floor when you do push ups. That's full range of motion, rather than 1 cm of the floor.'
My shoulders are a bit weak, I found out from attempting 14 pushups for 2 sets. Would lateral raises work?
What about my traps and lower back? What's next after angels and devils with weights?

'I'm not a fan of planks personally. Once you can plank for more than a minute, it's just an exercise in getting you even better at planking for a long time. Plus it's boring.'
Understandable.

'I would have thought how well you did in those athletic competitions should be a good indicator.'
Not that great. No awards.

As a side-note, if I can do pistol squats with 2kg behind my head, with both arms behind my head, as well as 0.5kg ankle weight, for 5 times for both legs, what would I be able to squat for barbell squats for 5 reps?
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Zain_Ahmed
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#12
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(Original post by Kyri)
To be honest, light dumbbells are pretty crap for chest training. Ordinarily, dumbbell bench press can be used as a staple for progressive overload and build chest muscle and strength, but if these light dumbbells are a weight you can biceps curl, then they're too light to challenge your chest sufficiently. You could do flyes (arms kept straight) with them I suppose, but if you're serious about training at home, I'd recommend getting a set of adjustable dumbbells with a range of weight plates, so you can gradually increase the amount you can handle. Progressive overload is the key to getting bigger and stronger.

As for pull up training, do you already have a pull up bar at home? You can start with negatives, as in, stand up on a chair and start at the top of the pull up and control the descent downwards. That will build strength towards being able to pull yourself up. If it's a pull up bar that hangs on the door frame, I really advise against jumping to get to the top, as it might knock the bar off the door frame. Jumping would usually be okay on a fixed pull up bar.
Arms straight or not straight dont have an impact when training chest. Just that arms straight can lead to injuries as it puts the arm in a vulnerable position
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justlearning1469
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(Original post by Zain_Ahmed)
Arms straight or not straight dont have an impact when training chest. Just that arms straight can lead to injuries as it puts the arm in a vulnerable position
Unfortunately I only have running dumbbells, so can't really do flies to train chest.

But at least I can do L-sit for a while to train abs. What could I do to get to V-sit?

For legs at least I can do weighted shrimp squats (only for a couple times).

If I join a gym, how would I fare in terms of strength against the other gym-goers?
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Kyri
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(Original post by justlearning1469)
'An easier way to weight push ups is with a weighted vest (I know you probably don't have one), but doing harder push up variations is the easiest way.'
I suppose. I still need to reinforce the one-armed pushup. On some days I can't even manage 1 solid rep, though I have managed 1 solid rep before.

'You need some kind of pull up bar to train pull ups at home. I'm personally not a fan of door frame pull up bars. I've seen too many videos of them coming off the frame but lots of people use them. I was using a pull up stand, specifically the pull up mate (because it's easy to put away) to do pull ups at home.'
Don't have it. Any alternative exercises? I do have light dumbbells for running, and ankle weights but that's it.

'Seeing as you'd need to buy a fair bit of equipment to train at home, you may be better off just joining a gym.'
COVID-19? But I'd eventually join a gym.

'Don't worry about how you stack up against others.'
I don't wanna be the guy who can't do a single pull-up. Though at least I can do L-sit for some time, and tuck planche for a short while before I collapse. As well as 1 solid rep of one-arm pushup. One time I did manage 7 pistol squats in a row and then I was already getting sore. For push-ups, 14 pushups for 2 sets is my best.
So in the gym I should be able to do OK-ish. Or am I underestimating/overestimating myself?

'There will be beginners there'
How much of beginners? Only being able to do 5 pushups (which is still
something)?
Don't think I am a beginner but I could be wrong. Intermediate perhaps?

'and there will be advanced lifters who are strong.'
Bench pressing 3x their bodyweight? And the 1000-pound club, I can see that happening for some advanced lifters. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TS1H_LX31mU) 501kg benchpress right there, dang.

'How many can do a one arm push up.... I've never seen a casual gym goer do one. It's not common.'
Well to some extent it depends on what form counts as '1 rep 1-arm pushup'.
If that casual gym goer who is decent sways and puts their legs insanely wide as well as a huge crowd cheering them on then maybe just maybe.
I was surprised by that, I thought some others like me who never even go to the gym or only go there a couple times can do a couple 1-arm pushups.

'Ideally your chest should lightly touch the floor when you do push ups. That's full range of motion, rather than 1 cm of the floor.'
My shoulders are a bit weak, I found out from attempting 14 pushups for 2 sets. Would lateral raises work?
What about my traps and lower back? What's next after angels and devils with weights?

'I'm not a fan of planks personally. Once you can plank for more than a minute, it's just an exercise in getting you even better at planking for a long time. Plus it's boring.'
Understandable.

'I would have thought how well you did in those athletic competitions should be a good indicator.'
Not that great. No awards.

As a side-note, if I can do pistol squats with 2kg behind my head, with both arms behind my head, as well as 0.5kg ankle weight, for 5 times for both legs, what would I be able to squat for barbell squats for 5 reps?
Alternativea to pull ups?... anything where you pull against the direction of gravity. If you get heavier dumbbells you could do rows. Or anchor some bands to a door. Bands aren't the best for strength but are cheap and better than nothing.

Three times bodyweight bench would be ridiculously strong. I've never seen it. Even two times bodyweight is impressive stuff. In my gym most guys probably bench a bit below their bodyweight.

Lateral raises isolate side delts. Won't improve pushups much. The muscles responsible for pushing up are pecs, triceps and front delts.

No idea what you'd be able to barbell squat. Pistol squats have a huge balance and stability aspect to them, while barbell squats are more raw strength (still demand core stability though). Plus the movement pattern is different. There are guys in the gym who squat way more than me who told me they can't do pistol squats.
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Kyri
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(Original post by Zain_Ahmed)
Arms straight or not straight dont have an impact when training chest. Just that arms straight can lead to injuries as it puts the arm in a vulnerable position
I agree with arms straight being more risky injury wise. I can't agree that it has no impact otherwise. Sure, the chest's main function is just to adduct the humerus, but you must also consider the direction of the load relative to where the dumbbell is going. Gravity (the load) is always downwards. In a bent arm bench press the dumbbells are going mostly upwards, directly opposite gravity the whole time. In a flye, near the top, the dumbbells are going inwards, not so much against gravity. The strength curve sucks for dumbbell flyes. Loads of tension at the bottom and hardly any at the top. But for presses the tension is far more consistent.
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justlearning1469
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(Original post by Kyri)
Alternativea to pull ups?... anything where you pull against the direction of gravity. If you get heavier dumbbells you could do rows. Or anchor some bands to a door. Bands aren't the best for strength but are cheap and better than nothing.

Three times bodyweight bench would be ridiculously strong. I've never seen it. Even two times bodyweight is impressive stuff. In my gym most guys probably bench a bit below their bodyweight.

Lateral raises isolate side delts. Won't improve pushups much. The muscles responsible for pushing up are pecs, triceps and front delts.

No idea what you'd be able to barbell squat. Pistol squats have a huge balance and stability aspect to them, while barbell squats are more raw strength (still demand core stability though). Plus the movement pattern is different. There are guys in the gym who squat way more than me who told me they can't do pistol squats.
'If you get heavier dumbbells you could do rows.'
Nah for me, I only have running dumbbells.

'Or anchor some bands to a door. Bands aren't the best for strength but are cheap and better than nothing.'
Unfortunately I don't have resistance bands.


'Three times bodyweight bench would be ridiculously strong.'
Compared to common people, you're totally right. There are various Olympic bench pressers who can actually manage that. But it is ridiculously strong.

'I've never seen it.'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=fyryhznuFvU is a case of an Olympic athlete managing 205 kg for 54 kg bodyweight. That is 3.8x bodyweight. It's way above 3x bodyweight and comes close to 4x.

Jason Coker successfully completed his 2nd Bench Attempt at 900 lbs, when he was 195.4lbs. This was achieved using a bench shirt. This is 4.6x bodyweight. So yes it is possible.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2j8LYRfzAOE

'Even two times bodyweight is impressive stuff.'
Agreed.

'In my gym most guys probably bench a bit below their bodyweight.'
If someone was male and 65kg, able to do 1-arm pushup for 1 rep for both arms, what would that person be able to bench at minimum?
https://robslink.com/SAS/democd79/body_part_weights.htm
You will see that for men 2 arms are 5.7% of the bodyweight.
They are pushing around 65% of the bodyweight during a pushup.

'No idea what you'd be able to barbell squat. Pistol squats have a huge balance and stability aspect to them, while barbell squats are more raw strength (still demand core stability though). Plus the movement pattern is different.'
For pistol squats the legs of 16.7% weight carry the other 83.3% weight.
That means a 150 pound person would have 25 pounds for legs and 125 pounds for other stuff. Each leg would carry 62.5 pounds in this.

If 12.5 pounds can carry 137.5 pounds (basically what you'd be doing in a pistol squat) then both legs can carry 275 pounds.
That is a 150 pound person + 125 pounds of extra weight (for instance a barbell).
That plus the balance and mobility makes the movement difficult. Especially if you put your arms behind your head, as well as a dumbbell behind to make the movement even harder.

What about prisoner pistol squats? Prisoner pistol squats with a leg raise before going up?

'There are guys in the gym who squat way more than me who told me they can't do pistol squats.'
How much do you squat? How much do those guys squat?
And do you think it's a balancing or mobility issue?

'Lateral raises isolate side delts. Won't improve pushups much.'
I suppose. But I was gonna take a bit of a break from training pushups.

'The muscles responsible for pushing up are pecs, triceps and front delts.'
I can do L-sit hold for a decent while, and maybe I should try L-sit walks. Would that work as triceps training?
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Kyri
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#17
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#17
(Original post by justlearning1469)
'If you get heavier dumbbells you could do rows.'
Nah for me, I only have running dumbbells.

'Or anchor some bands to a door. Bands aren't the best for strength but are cheap and better than nothing.'
Unfortunately I don't have resistance bands.


'Three times bodyweight bench would be ridiculously strong.'
Compared to common people, you're totally right. There are various Olympic bench pressers who can actually manage that. But it is ridiculously strong.

'I've never seen it.'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=fyryhznuFvU is a case of an Olympic athlete managing 205 kg for 54 kg bodyweight. That is 3.8x bodyweight. It's way above 3x bodyweight and comes close to 4x.

Jason Coker successfully completed his 2nd Bench Attempt at 900 lbs, when he was 195.4lbs. This was achieved using a bench shirt. This is 4.6x bodyweight. So yes it is possible.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2j8LYRfzAOE

'Even two times bodyweight is impressive stuff.'
Agreed.

'In my gym most guys probably bench a bit below their bodyweight.'
If someone was male and 65kg, able to do 1-arm pushup for 1 rep for both arms, what would that person be able to bench at minimum?
https://robslink.com/SAS/democd79/body_part_weights.htm
You will see that for men 2 arms are 5.7% of the bodyweight.
They are pushing around 65% of the bodyweight during a pushup.

'No idea what you'd be able to barbell squat. Pistol squats have a huge balance and stability aspect to them, while barbell squats are more raw strength (still demand core stability though). Plus the movement pattern is different.'
For pistol squats the legs of 16.7% weight carry the other 83.3% weight.
That means a 150 pound person would have 25 pounds for legs and 125 pounds for other stuff. Each leg would carry 62.5 pounds in this.

If 12.5 pounds can carry 137.5 pounds (basically what you'd be doing in a pistol squat) then both legs can carry 275 pounds.
That is a 150 pound person + 125 pounds of extra weight (for instance a barbell).
That plus the balance and mobility makes the movement difficult. Especially if you put your arms behind your head, as well as a dumbbell behind to make the movement even harder.

What about prisoner pistol squats? Prisoner pistol squats with a leg raise before going up?

'There are guys in the gym who squat way more than me who told me they can't do pistol squats.'
How much do you squat? How much do those guys squat?
And do you think it's a balancing or mobility issue?

'Lateral raises isolate side delts. Won't improve pushups much.'
I suppose. But I was gonna take a bit of a break from training pushups.

'The muscles responsible for pushing up are pecs, triceps and front delts.'
I can do L-sit hold for a decent while, and maybe I should try L-sit walks. Would that work as triceps training?
I know there are world class elite lifters who can lift that much, but I mean I've never physically seen people lift that much in a gym. Only on youtube.

Prisoner pistol squats are a bit harder because you can't use your arms as a counter balance, but you're still pushing the same weight in the end.

For myself, my working range for squats is around 120 to 140 kg (sets of 5 to 10). I see other guys squatting similar reps in the 140 to 180 kg range who can't pistol squat but they weight a lot more than me. Body weight does play into it a lot. I doubt it's a lack of strength, just a lack of practising the movement pattern, because it is a little bit different.

L-sits for triceps training... nah, that's not effective. It's a hard movement for sure, but spreads isometrics tension over your whole body. If you specifically want to train triceps, choose an exercise that puts your triceps through their full range of motion. You could do this easily with narrow pushups.
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justlearning1469
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#18
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by Kyri)
I know there are world class elite lifters who can lift that much, but I mean I've never physically seen people lift that much in a gym. Only on youtube.

Prisoner pistol squats are a bit harder because you can't use your arms as a counter balance, but you're still pushing the same weight in the end.

For myself, my working range for squats is around 120 to 140 kg (sets of 5 to 10). I see other guys squatting similar reps in the 140 to 180 kg range who can't pistol squat but they weight a lot more than me. Body weight does play into it a lot. I doubt it's a lack of strength, just a lack of practising the movement pattern, because it is a little bit different.

L-sits for triceps training... nah, that's not effective. It's a hard movement for sure, but spreads isometrics tension over your whole body. If you specifically want to train triceps, choose an exercise that puts your triceps through their full range of motion. You could do this easily with narrow pushups.
'Prisoner pistol squats are a bit harder because you can't use your arms as a counter balance, but you're still pushing the same weight in the end.'
True. Though weighted pistol squats with the weight I got is keeping me busy for some time.
And if I intend to pursue world record in pistol squats in 1 minute... what exercises would work best?

'For myself, my working range for squats is around 120 to 140 kg (sets of 5 to 10).'
I don't even know how much can I squat. But I can squat 3 kg pistol squat, 3kg behind my back, as well as 0.5kg ankle weight, pretty easily. I start getting exhausted at the 10th rep in a row. Bodyweight 70kg.

'Body weight does play into it a lot.'
True.

'I doubt it's a lack of strength, just a lack of practising the movement pattern, because it is a little bit different.'
Agreed.

'You could do this easily with narrow pushups.'
I guess.

'L-sits for triceps training... nah, that's not effective. It's a hard movement for sure, but spreads isometrics tension over your whole body. If you specifically want to train triceps, choose an exercise that puts your triceps through their full range of motion.'
Abs training?
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Alventide
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#19
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#19
I didn't train for one arm push ups, I just got strong on benching(265 lbs x 10) and tried doing one arm push ups, I managed to do 3 but thhat was all lmao.
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justlearning1469
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#20
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#20
(Original post by Alventide)
I didn't train for one arm push ups, I just got strong on benching(265 lbs x 10) and tried doing one arm push ups, I managed to do 3 but thhat was all lmao.
I've never even benched before. Tried it and managed 1 rep.
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