What courses should I take?

Watch
Lexandr2020
Badges: 3
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I'm a student taking psychology, computer science and photography and love all 3 equally. but I also enjoy crime psychology and investigation (since we touched upon it in psychology). what courses would you recommend? I'm looking for one that has a bit of all. teacher recommends forensics and there's a course in University of Central Lancashire which does forensics science with investigation which has cyber crime, advanced photography and obviously psychology.
0
reply
5hyl33n
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Lexandr2020)
I'm a student taking psychology, computer science and photography and love all 3 equally. but I also enjoy crime psychology and investigation (since we touched upon it in psychology). what courses would you recommend? I'm looking for one that has a bit of all. teacher recommends forensics and there's a course in University of Central Lancashire which does forensics science with investigation which has cyber crime, advanced photography and obviously psychology.
Thread has been moved to ‘applications, clearing and ucas’. :yy:
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Really depends on exactly what aspects of the different courses appeal to you. For example, the cognitive science degree at Edinburgh if you are very interested in the cognitive aspects of psychology along with computer science - and also links to things such as computer vision, which may relate to interests in photography if you're interested in the technical aspects of image capture.

I would note that none are really all that relevant to crime and forensic science, although courses may well sell that to you...to begin with, a forensic scientist is not a crime scene investigator/SOCO. A forensic scientist will normally work in a sort of "factory line" setup where you will perform a particular scientific procedure over and over again, to a high standard of accuracy, and document the results. You would in no circumstances interpret those results, and if there was any suggestion you had pretty much any lawyer would have that evidence thrown out of court for being handled by someone who was biased.

Beyond that, it's worth noting that it is not a "growth" field. The number of forensic scientists needed by the UK is not growing and there are far more than enough qualified grads to go into those roles - many of whom did a traditional "basic science" degree (e.g. biology, chemistry, biochemistry, etc), rather than the so-called "CSI degrees" which a number of newer unis jumped upon with the surge in police procedurals to capture a new market of students. Any traditional science degree will prepare you to become a forensic scientist, and will also give you the background needed to go into other areas or scientific/lab based roles. A forensic science degree pidgeonholes you into that area which doesn't even have a great demand for workers in the first place. Anecdotally speaking the one person I met who did a forensic science degree seemed to have mainly learned some very questionable and outdated "science".

Likewise, a crime scene photographer will not interpret the images they take, they will merely be there to document things. You'll need a good technical background in understanding how to photograph things accurately but there won't be any creative input into "framing" the shot or anything. You most likely don't need a degree, in photography or otherwise, to go down that route.

Note also there is almost no such thing as a "criminal profiler" as popularised on TV who is some kind of psychologist who psychologises criminals and "gets into their minds". Such activities have long been proven to be completely abitrary and not to make any difference in apprehending criminals and more often than not will probably impose the biases of the "practitioner" on the case anyway. Forensic psychologists will likely mainly work on rehabilitation programmes, treatment plans for prisoners with mental health conditions, and wellbeing issues for prisoners and those working in the criminal justice sector. That is definitely an option, although it may not be what you're expecting.

You should also be aware to become a forensic psychologist (or any kind of professional psychologist e.g. clinical psychologist, etc), you need to do a BPS accredited psychology degree at some point - it's easier to do that as your undergraduate course if that is your aim, than a non-accredited course and have to a conversions masters (especially since to be competitive you probably need to do a masters that is not a conversion masters no matter what, and you only get limited funding for a single masters course).

There are of course connections between the three subjects separate to "crime" (which as noted doesn't really connect any of them meaningfully). Something like Edinburgh's cognitive science degree has a pretty strong link between CS and psychology, and a major branch of CS which may feature in that course is computer vision, which may relate to the technical aspects of capturing digital images. You might also find ergonomics/human-computer interaction/human factors engineering of interest, as that relates a lot of psychological concepts into the design of (digital) systems. This doesn't necessarily involved photography that much.

Beyond that a digital arts course or lens based creative art/design course may well incorporate aspects of CS or psychology while focusing on photography, depending on your creative interests; you may for example be inspired by certain psychological concepts and want to explore those creatively, or you may want to develop some e.g. coding skills to use in multimedia work (note though that CS is much more than just coding/programming, and in most CS degrees programming is often a very small part of the course mainly used to express the other concepts you are learning, more of a means to an end). Also in any traditionally academic degree (in CS, psychology, or something else) you can always allow yourself to explore photography in your own time - it may be more rewarding to do so without the constraints of external assessments being imposed upon your work!
0
reply
McGinger
Badges: 18
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
The problem with a 'niche' degree like Forensics is that if you change your mind half way through the degree or can't get a job when you graduate, then you are stuck with a degree you can't use for anything else. And Forensics isnt that 'glamourous' btw - it isnt like Silent Witness.

Look at degree subjects that would allow you more flexibilty on graduation - Law (useful for hundreds of different careers), Sociology, Finance Technology (growing field), Cyber Security, or even Mental Health Nursing.
0
reply
Lexandr2020
Badges: 3
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Really depends on exactly what aspects of the different courses appeal to you. For example, the cognitive science degree at Edinburgh if you are very interested in the cognitive aspects of psychology along with computer science - and also links to things such as computer vision, which may relate to interests in photography if you're interested in the technical aspects of image capture.

I would note that none are really all that relevant to crime and forensic science, although courses may well sell that to you...to begin with, a forensic scientist is not a crime scene investigator/SOCO. A forensic scientist will normally work in a sort of "factory line" setup where you will perform a particular scientific procedure over and over again, to a high standard of accuracy, and document the results. You would in no circumstances interpret those results, and if there was any suggestion you had pretty much any lawyer would have that evidence thrown out of court for being handled by someone who was biased.

Beyond that, it's worth noting that it is not a "growth" field. The number of forensic scientists needed by the UK is not growing and there are far more than enough qualified grads to go into those roles - many of whom did a traditional "basic science" degree (e.g. biology, chemistry, biochemistry, etc), rather than the so-called "CSI degrees" which a number of newer unis jumped upon with the surge in police procedurals to capture a new market of students. Any traditional science degree will prepare you to become a forensic scientist, and will also give you the background needed to go into other areas or scientific/lab based roles. A forensic science degree pidgeonholes you into that area which doesn't even have a great demand for workers in the first place. Anecdotally speaking the one person I met who did a forensic science degree seemed to have mainly learned some very questionable and outdated "science".

Likewise, a crime scene photographer will not interpret the images they take, they will merely be there to document things. You'll need a good technical background in understanding how to photograph things accurately but there won't be any creative input into "framing" the shot or anything. You most likely don't need a degree, in photography or otherwise, to go down that route.

Note also there is almost no such thing as a "criminal profiler" as popularised on TV who is some kind of psychologist who psychologises criminals and "gets into their minds". Such activities have long been proven to be completely abitrary and not to make any difference in apprehending criminals and more often than not will probably impose the biases of the "practitioner" on the case anyway. Forensic psychologists will likely mainly work on rehabilitation programmes, treatment plans for prisoners with mental health conditions, and wellbeing issues for prisoners and those working in the criminal justice sector. That is definitely an option, although it may not be what you're expecting.

You should also be aware to become a forensic psychologist (or any kind of professional psychologist e.g. clinical psychologist, etc), you need to do a BPS accredited psychology degree at some point - it's easier to do that as your undergraduate course if that is your aim, than a non-accredited course and have to a conversions masters (especially since to be competitive you probably need to do a masters that is not a conversion masters no matter what, and you only get limited funding for a single masters course).

There are of course connections between the three subjects separate to "crime" (which as noted doesn't really connect any of them meaningfully). Something like Edinburgh's cognitive science degree has a pretty strong link between CS and psychology, and a major branch of CS which may feature in that course is computer vision, which may relate to the technical aspects of capturing digital images. You might also find ergonomics/human-computer interaction/human factors engineering of interest, as that relates a lot of psychological concepts into the design of (digital) systems. This doesn't necessarily involved photography that much.

Beyond that a digital arts course or lens based creative art/design course may well incorporate aspects of CS or psychology while focusing on photography, depending on your creative interests; you may for example be inspired by certain psychological concepts and want to explore those creatively, or you may want to develop some e.g. coding skills to use in multimedia work (note though that CS is much more than just coding/programming, and in most CS degrees programming is often a very small part of the course mainly used to express the other concepts you are learning, more of a means to an end). Also in any traditionally academic degree (in CS, psychology, or something else) you can always allow yourself to explore photography in your own time - it may be more rewarding to do so without the constraints of external assessments being imposed upon your work!
this helps a lot. thank you so much!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What is your favourite revision method?

Taking notes manually (53)
21.72%
Note taking apps (6)
2.46%
Flashcards (47)
19.26%
Revision guides (15)
6.15%
Past papers (115)
47.13%
Something else (let us know in the thread) (8)
3.28%

Watched Threads

View All