Homeschooled through GCSEs?

Watch this thread
pikushibu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#1
Hi, so I was attending a public secondary school but had to drop out in around april 2019 (i was in year 8) as I had to go to hospital. I was in the hospital for just a little over two years, and have been home since july this year. I picked my gcse options in year 8 but never actually started the gcse course in year 9. So in hospital I was teaching myself the curriculum through textbooks, online websites and the teachers at the hospital school were helping me too. I'm now supposed to be in year 11 and taking my gcses in 2022 next year, however I'm still relatively behind so I believe it's more realistic for me to repeat year 10 and do my gcses in 2023. However, i've seen recommendations online that homeschooled students should take iGCSE instead of gcse, specifically for subjects like biology, chemistry, physics and geography. At this point though, I've nearly finished teaching myself the entire AQA curriculum for the three sciences (I'm doing triple science) and other subjects eg AQA geography. Is there no possibility I can take these exams, or will I have to redo it all and learn the iGCSE curriculum instead? I'm unsure about how any controlled assessment works too, I know my exam boards that I was doing in public school but how does this work? How do exams works for homeschooled GCSE students? Plus how is coursework involved,? I'm just hoping that I wont have to do all the work all over again.
AQA- tripe science biology, chemistry, physics(my old schools website says no controlled assessment for physics), geography, English literature(an inspector calls, macbeth, love and relationships poetry, a christmas carol but apparently my old school has dropped that because of covid?)
Edexcel- english language(school website also mentions a spoken language assessment at the end of year 10?), maths
Eduqas Exam Board Route A- religious studies
I was doing French and Art in public school but have found them to difficult/inconvenient to do myself so have pretty much dropped them
Last edited by pikushibu; 8 months ago
0
reply
shay21xo
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 8 months ago
#2
hi! if you feel like you’re behind on subjects still, it’s probably best for you to repeat year 10 in order to have everything you need to nail your GCSE’s. it’s important that you get your maths and english as those at the ones everyone looks at but you do what you think is best for you
0
reply
EOData
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 8 months ago
#3
As sar as you're concerned coursework=controlled assessment=non examinations assessment (NEA). The current name for it is NEA.

If you're home schooled without a regular relationship with an exam centre than you need to avoid any NEA and that generally means taking IGCSEs wher NEA, or a requirement to prove you've done fieldwork, exists for GCSE.

(To be continued)
0
reply
PinkMobilePhone
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 8 months ago
#4
My children are all home educated. My daughter has done a few GCSE/IGCSEs already, and is doing more in summer 2022. I've also got 2 sons doing a couple of IGCSEs each in summer 2022.

Yes you're right that most home educated students take IGCSEs for subjects such as sciences, and English language, because the GCSE sciences have practicals and the GCSE English has a speaking component, which many exam centres for private candidates cannot accommodate... however if there is a Tutors & Exams centre near you, I'd recommend giving them a ring and seeing if they can accommodate you for the exam boards you have previously been studying. They are quite good at dealing with practical elements to exams.

If that's not an option, then yes you're going to have to switch to IGCSEs, however there's a lot of overlap in material, so you won't have to learn everything again completely from scratch. You'll just need to make a few adaptations for the IGCSE specifications that's all, but you have enough time to do that.
For the sciences, just look at which topics aren't overlapping, and focus on those. There won't be that many to be honest.

For English Language, if you need to switch to IGCSE, I recommend the one my daughter did last month which is IGCSE English Language B. There is no anthology, no coursework, no speaking component.
It's very straight-forward.
Just practice comprehension, letter writing (both formal and informal), fictional short story writing, article writing, general spelling and grammar.
Here's a sample exam paper:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...ep_issue_2.pdf

For Maths you can still do GCSE. There's no need to switch if you don't want to.

For Religious Studies again you can do GCSE.

Geography has some fieldwork I believe. I'm not as clued up about Geography - none of mine have taken it yet.

What do you want to do after GCSEs? Most colleges ask for a minimum of 5 GCSEs (or IGCSEs) including Maths and English, so you could cut down your workload a lot by dropping a few subjects.
Last edited by PinkMobilePhone; 8 months ago
2
reply
pikushibu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#5
(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
My children are all home educated. My daughter has done a few GCSE/IGCSEs already, and is doing more in summer 2022. I've also got 2 sons doing a couple of IGCSEs each in summer 2022.

Yes you're right that most home educated students take IGCSEs for subjects such as sciences, and English language, because the GCSE sciences have practicals and the GCSE English has a speaking component, which many exam centres for private candidates cannot accommodate... however if there is a Tutors & Exams centre near you, I'd recommend giving them a ring and seeing if they can accommodate you for the exam boards you have previously been studying. They are quite good at dealing with practical elements to exams.

If that's not an option, then yes you're going to have to switch to IGCSEs, however there's a lot of overlap in material, so you won't have to learn everything again completely from scratch. You'll just need to make a few adaptations for the IGCSE specifications that's all, but you have enough time to do that.
For the sciences, just look at which topics aren't overlapping, and focus on those. There won't be that many to be honest.

For English Language, if you need to switch to IGCSE, I recommend the one my daughter did last month which is IGCSE English Language B. There is no anthology, no coursework, no speaking component.
It's very straight-forward.
Just practice comprehension, letter writing (both formal and informal), fictional short story writing, article writing, general spelling and grammar.
Here's a sample exam paper:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...ep_issue_2.pdf

For Maths you can still do GCSE. There's no need to switch if you don't want to.

For Religious Studies again you can do GCSE.

Geography has some fieldwork I believe. I'm not as clued up about Geography - none of mine have taken it yet.

What do you want to do after GCSEs? Most colleges ask for a minimum of 5 GCSEs (or IGCSEs) including Maths and English, so you could cut down your workload a lot by dropping a few subjects.
Thank you so much for this, this is really helpful. Yeah I've already rung up a few exam centres around me and they've recommended iGCSEs for the subjects you said too, and now that I've looked at it there is a lot of overlap for the sciences so it should be fine. I want to ideally go to sixth form. Thank you for your help though, I appreciate it
0
reply
PinkMobilePhone
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 8 months ago
#6
(Original post by pikushibu)
Thank you so much for this, this is really helpful. Yeah I've already rung up a few exam centres around me and they've recommended iGCSEs for the subjects you said too, and now that I've looked at it there is a lot of overlap for the sciences so it should be fine. I want to ideally go to sixth form. Thank you for your help though, I appreciate it
You'll be fine I'm sure
If you want to know anything else, give me a shout.
0
reply
HelloHello143
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 8 months ago
#7
U don't have to do them all at the same time do u? In my school we did English literature in year 10 and the rest in year 11, in my old high school my friends did a different GCSE in year 9 or 10 also

Plus u can retake gcses so I guess there's no harm in doing the ones u feel comfortable with cuz even if u didn't do good u can take them with the others in 2023
0
reply
leena_1473
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 7 months ago
#8
(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
My children are all home educated. My daughter has done a few GCSE/IGCSEs already, and is doing more in summer 2022. I've also got 2 sons doing a couple of IGCSEs each in summer 2022.

Yes you're right that most home educated students take IGCSEs for subjects such as sciences, and English language, because the GCSE sciences have practicals and the GCSE English has a speaking component, which many exam centres for private candidates cannot accommodate... however if there is a Tutors & Exams centre near you, I'd recommend giving them a ring and seeing if they can accommodate you for the exam boards you have previously been studying. They are quite good at dealing with practical elements to exams.

If that's not an option, then yes you're going to have to switch to IGCSEs, however there's a lot of overlap in material, so you won't have to learn everything again completely from scratch. You'll just need to make a few adaptations for the IGCSE specifications that's all, but you have enough time to do that.
For the sciences, just look at which topics aren't overlapping, and focus on those. There won't be that many to be honest.

For English Language, if you need to switch to IGCSE, I recommend the one my daughter did last month which is IGCSE English Language B. There is no anthology, no coursework, no speaking component.
It's very straight-forward.
Just practice comprehension, letter writing (both formal and informal), fictional short story writing, article writing, general spelling and grammar.
Here's a sample exam paper:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...ep_issue_2.pdf

For Maths you can still do GCSE. There's no need to switch if you don't want to.

For Religious Studies again you can do GCSE.

Geography has some fieldwork I believe. I'm not as clued up about Geography - none of mine have taken it yet.

What do you want to do after GCSEs? Most colleges ask for a minimum of 5 GCSEs (or IGCSEs) including Maths and English, so you could cut down your workload a lot by dropping a few subjects.
So if you learn the practical elements while being homeschooled, could you continue with the GCSE curriculum. I'm homeschooled and teaching myself so I'm in a very similar position to the original post but I am panicking right now because no one's told me anything. I've just had to learn it all by myself.
Last edited by leena_1473; 7 months ago
0
reply
PinkMobilePhone
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report 7 months ago
#9
(Original post by leena_1473)
So if you learn the practical elements while being homeschooled, could you continue with the GCSE curriculum. I'm homeschooled and teaching myself so I'm in a very similar position to the original post but I am panicking right now because no one's told me anything. I've just had to learn it all by myself.
It's the carrying out of the practicals that causes the problems.
They can't be done at home, they need to be signed off, and many exam centres won't accommodate them.

Like I told the OP though, Tutors and Exams (exam centre company) are quite good at accommodating practicals, so if there's a centre near your it's worth giving them a ring.
They have a few centres around the country.

www.tutorsandexams.uk
0
reply
PinkMobilePhone
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report 7 months ago
#10
I'm really baffled how you both are being left to figure this stuff out yourselves?
Aren't your parents sorting all this out for you?

I spend the majority of my life sorting courses amd exams and so on out for my kids, and making sure of which specifications they're taking.
They wouldn't have the foggiest idea what they were meant to be doing themselves.

You should have some parental guidance for this sort of thing.
0
reply
leena_1473
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report 7 months ago
#11
(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
It's the carrying out of the practicals that causes the problems.
They can't be done at home, they need to be signed off, and many exam centres won't accommodate them.

Like I told the OP though, Tutors and Exams (exam centre company) are quite good at accommodating practicals, so if there's a centre near your it's worth giving them a ring.
They have a few centres around the country.

www.tutorsandexams.uk
But many schools aren’t able to do practicals at the moment and they just learn the steps. Can’t I do that?
0
reply
leena_1473
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#12
Report 7 months ago
#12
(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
I'm really baffled how you both are being left to figure this stuff out yourselves?
Aren't your parents sorting all this out for you?

I spend the majority of my life sorting courses amd exams and so on out for my kids, and making sure of which specifications they're taking.
They wouldn't have the foggiest idea what they were meant to be doing themselves.

You should have some parental guidance for this sort of thing.
They have no idea. They’re paying for the exams, classes that I can take but everything else is being left up to me. I became homeschooled as a last resort because I was bullied in my previous school and the schools I wanted to switch to didn’t take my combination of subjects.
0
reply
leena_1473
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#13
Report 7 months ago
#13
My exam centre that I’m looking at says you may call in for Science practicals. Okay cool but that leaves me with the speaking assessments
0
reply
PinkMobilePhone
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#14
Report 7 months ago
#14
(Original post by leena_1473)
But many schools aren’t able to do practicals at the moment and they just learn the steps. Can’t I do that?
No it's sort of akin to coursework.

IGCSE you just learn about the experiments without actually doing them, whereas GCSE you have to do them.

It's not too hard to switch to IGCSE though. The material overlaps a lot.
0
reply
leena_1473
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#15
Report 7 months ago
#15
(Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
No it's sort of akin to coursework.

IGCSE you just learn about the experiments without actually doing them, whereas GCSE you have to do them.

It's not too hard to switch to IGCSE though. The material overlaps a lot.
I don’t understand. If a lot of schools don’t do the practicals, why can’t I do the same?
0
reply
Nalde33
Badges: 1
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#16
Report 7 months ago
#16
Hi!
My daughter is home schooled.
I would say more like self schooled, as I work full time.
She is suffering with severe social anxiety, which is getting better at the moment.
But I recommend you to reach out Facebook "home schooling" group.
Group is full with sub groups which helps kids to get ready for GCSEs, colleges etc...
0
reply
EOData
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#17
Report 7 months ago
#17
(Original post by leena_1473)
So if you learn the practical elements while being homeschooled, could you continue with the GCSE curriculum. I'm homeschooled and teaching myself so I'm in a very similar position to the original post but I am panicking right now because no one's told me anything. I've just had to learn it all by myself.
In a normal year the centre has to sign to say that you have completed all the practicals. Not sure what the requirement will be this year. Centres can't do that for external candidates so they can't accept them. IGCSE does not have a similar requirement.
0
reply
leena_1473
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#18
Report 7 months ago
#18
(Original post by EOData)
In a normal year the centre has to sign to say that you have completed all the practicals. Not sure what the requirement will be this year. Centres can't do that for external candidates so they can't accept them. IGCSE does not have a similar requirement.
Okay. For English Language, would I also have to do iGCSE. I know for Spanish, I can just take speaking as well. It’s just more expensive
0
reply
EOData
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#19
Report 7 months ago
#19
(Original post by leena_1473)
Okay. For English Language, would I also have to do iGCSE. I know for Spanish, I can just take speaking as well. It’s just more expensive
If the exam centre offers you the chance to take the speaking and listening there then you can do IGCSE. If not then you'll need to go for the Edexcel IGCSE 1000% exam option.
0
reply
leena_1473
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#20
Report 7 months ago
#20
(Original post by EOData)
If the exam centre offers you the chance to take the speaking and listening there then you can do IGCSE. If not then you'll need to go for the Edexcel IGCSE 1000% exam option.
Can’t I just stick with normal GCSE English Language?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

Y13s: How will you be receiving your A-level results?

In person (50)
69.44%
In the post (2)
2.78%
Text (10)
13.89%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (10)
13.89%

Watched Threads

View All