GlueSniffer
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#1
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#1
Okay so this going to be quite a unique set of academics so I'm just curious.


GCSE'S = 8 D'S AND 1 C (Never cared)
BTEC = MMM in Engineering (Never cared)
Degree = 85% first in Law (top of the class) (I started to care)

I know this is going to sound quite ridiculous but how hard would it be for someone like this to get into Grad medicine?
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hungrysalamander
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#2
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Graduate entry medicine will always be more competitive than standard entry. A lot of it also comes down to your UCAT/GAMSAT scores and you will need to check whether medical schools will accept non-stem degrees.
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Incidentaloma
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#3
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It would be possible, but difficult. A lot would depend on your UCAT/GAMSAT score, as hungrysalamander said. Many GEM courses still require particular A-levels. Going from engineering to law to medicine would also raise questions about your motivation, so you'd need a bit of relevant experience (care work, shadowing, etc.) if you haven't got any already.
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ecolier
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#4
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#4
(Original post by GlueSniffer)
Okay so this going to be quite a unique set of academics so I'm just curious.


GCSE'S = 8 D'S AND 1 C (Never cared)
BTEC = MMM in Engineering (Never cared)
Degree = 85% first in Law (top of the class) (I started to care)

I know this is going to sound quite ridiculous but how hard would it be for someone like this to get into Grad medicine?
Not easy as said. Even with a bioscience degree, and a full set of GEM med schools to choose from it's several times more competitive than standard undergrad medicine.

With a non life science course, some med schools may ask for A-Level Chemistry / Biology so you'd need to do that. You would also be limited in the number of med schools you can apply to.
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GlueSniffer
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#5
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(Original post by hungrysalamander)
Graduate entry medicine will always be more competitive than standard entry. A lot of it also comes down to your UCAT/GAMSAT scores and you will need to check whether medical schools will accept non-stem degrees.
Hi, thanks for you response
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GlueSniffer
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#6
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(Original post by Incidentaloma)
It would be possible, but difficult. A lot would depend on your UCAT/GAMSAT score, as hungrysalamander said. Many GEM courses still require particular A-levels. Going from engineering to law to medicine would also raise questions about your motivation, so you'd need a bit of relevant experience (care work, shadowing, etc.) if you haven't got any already.
hi , thanks for the response
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GlueSniffer
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#7
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(Original post by ecolier)
Not easy as said. Even with a bioscience degree, and a full set of GEM med schools to choose from it's several times more competitive than standard undergrad medicine.

With a non life science course, some med schools may ask for A-Level Chemistry / Biology so you'd need to do that. You would also be limited in the number of med schools you can apply to.
Hi thanks for the response ,

Would you say it would be basically impossible to get in without doing A levels with my academics? I have some shadowing work experiance but thats about it . I also woulnd't mind sitting the tests that the users above has stated about.
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ecolier
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#8
(Original post by GlueSniffer)
Hi thanks for the response ,

Would you say it would be basically impossible to get in without doing A levels with my academics? I have some shadowing work experiance but thats about it . I also woulnd't mind sitting the tests that the users above has stated about.
Ok so here are the GEM courses:
- Birmingham: needs a life science subject
- Cambridge: any subject but needs AAA at A-Levels
- Cardiff: any subject but BBC / ABC at A-Levels (for applicants in Wales)
- KCL: needs a bioscience subject
- Liverpool (not running 2022 entry ? 2023 entry): needs biological, biomedical or health science plus BBB at A-Levels
- Newcastle: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Nottingham: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Oxford: applied or experimental science and AAB in A-Levels (A / A* Chemistry)
- QMUL: bioscience or other science + A-Level / AS-Level Grade C Biology and/or Chemistry or non-science degree + A-Level / AS-Level Grade B Biology or Chemistry and one other science
- Sheffield: needs life sciences plus BBB at A-Levels
- Southampton: any subject, but needs at least Grade C GCSE in English, Maths, Chemistry and Biology
- ScotGEM: any subject but needs Grade B or above in Chemistry + GCSE Grade B Maths
- SGUL: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Swansea: any subject, GCSE Grade C in English and Maths
- Ulster Uni: any subject, GCSE Grade C in English
- Warwick: any subject, no A-Level requirements

I have bolded and underlined the ones you could potentially apply to - assuming your Maths and English aren't the Grade C in GCSE.

As you can see, you can only apply to 4 medicine courses and there are literally only 4 you can apply to. It's risky.

Have you considered alternatives, like Physician Associate? It's very, very similar to being a junior doctor. https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...cian-associate
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GlueSniffer
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#9
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#9
(Original post by ecolier)
Ok so here are the GEM courses:
- Birmingham: needs a life science subject
- Cambridge: any subject but needs AAA at A-Levels
- Cardiff: any subject but BBC / ABC at A-Levels (for applicants in Wales)
- KCL: needs a bioscience subject
- Liverpool (not running 2022 entry ? 2023 entry): needs biological, biomedical or health science plus BBB at A-Levels
- Newcastle: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Nottingham: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Oxford: applied or experimental science and AAB in A-Levels (A / A* Chemistry)
- QMUL: bioscience or other science + A-Level / AS-Level Grade C Biology and/or Chemistry or non-science degree + A-Level / AS-Level Grade B Biology or Chemistry and one other science
- Sheffield: needs life sciences plus BBB at A-Levels
- Southampton: any subject, but needs at least Grade C GCSE in English, Maths, Chemistry and Biology
- ScotGEM: any subject but needs Grade B or above in Chemistry + GCSE Grade B Maths
- SGUL: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Swansea: any subject, GCSE Grade C in English and Maths
- Ulster Uni: any subject, GCSE Grade C in English
- Warwick: any subject, no A-Level requirements

I have bolded and underlined the ones you could potentially apply to - assuming your Maths and English aren't the Grade C in GCSE.

As you can see, you can only apply to 4 medicine courses and there are literally only 4 you can apply to. It's risky.

Have you considered alternatives, like Physician Associate? It's very, very similar to being a junior doctor. https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...cian-associate
So realistically , I have very little chance. Lol this has been quite eye opening.

I would think my exceptional law degree would allow me to walk into any GEM course but it seems i was very naive.Thanks for taking the time to write this up aswell.
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Democracy
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#10
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#10
(Original post by GlueSniffer)
So realistically , I have very little chance. Lol this has been quite eye opening.

I would think my exceptional law degree would allow me to walk into any GEM course but it seems i was very naive.Thanks for taking the time to write this up aswell.
Well, perhaps not walk into it but such a concept does not exist in medical school admissions, even for students with all A*s.

However, with a few adjustments you might still stand a reasonable chance.

Is it worth resitting maths and/or English language? You have clearly managed to motivate yourself into getting a high first in law, maybe you could do the same with a few of your GCSEs?

The list ecolier has provided gives you the minimum four choices you need (entrance exams permitting). Resitting a few of your GCSEs would expand that list further, so I wouldn't lose hope.

(GEP graduate)
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GlueSniffer
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Democracy)
Well, perhaps not walk into it but such a concept does not exist in medical school admissions, even for students with all A*s.

However, with a few adjustments you might still stand a reasonable chance.

Is it worth resitting maths and/or English language? You have clearly managed to motivate yourself into getting a high first in law, maybe you could do the same with a few of your GCSEs?

The list ecolier has provided gives you the minimum four choices you need (entrance exams permitting). Resitting a few of your GCSEs would expand that list further, so I wouldn't lose hope.

(GEP graduate)
Okay thanks for taking the time to write this,

Can I ask though , what would be the point in doing my english GCSE's again when I did very good in a writing-style degree(law)?
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artful_lounger
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#12
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#12
(Original post by GlueSniffer)
Okay thanks for taking the time to write this,

Can I ask though , what would be the point in doing my english GCSE's again when I did very good in a writing-style degree(law)?
Because GCSEs are often used as minimum requirements for degrees (including GEM), and so they are a necessary condition for entry into the course. If you don't have it, you just don't get progressed - and they have enough applicants they have no reason to try and equivocate with your degree.

In general GCSE Maths and English are also used as a standard literacy/numeracy target by the government and hence by many universities and employers. So you may want to look into retaking those even if you don't plan to apply to GEM, as a lot of jobs might well require that anyway.
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GlueSniffer
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#13
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#13
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Because GCSEs are often used as minimum requirements for degrees (including GEM), and so they are a necessary condition for entry into the course. If you don't have it, you just don't get progressed - and they have enough applicants they have no reason to try and equivocate with your degree.

In general GCSE Maths and English are also used as a standard literacy/numeracy target by the government and hence by many universities and employers. So you may want to look into retaking those even if you don't plan to apply to GEM, as a lot of jobs might well require that anyway.
Thanks for the response ,

Apparently it takes 12-18 months to get exam ready for GCSE's . that seems like awful long time for something I did like 6 years ago lol
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artful_lounger
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#14
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#14
(Original post by GlueSniffer)
Thanks for the response ,

Apparently it takes 12-18 months to get exam ready for GCSE's . that seems like awful long time for something I did like 6 years ago lol
I doubt it would take that long for a grad, for English language you probably could just take a few weeks to prepare by looking over past papers, the assessment objectives/criteria and using your general academic skills based on your prior study. For maths it may take a bit longer depending on when you last did any maths but in principle the same approach would apply (if you haven't done any maths in a long time it may be worth getting a tutor for it though).

Bear in mind a C equivalent grade is not a huge ask - and since these are usually minimum requirements, unless they otherwise score GCSEs (and obviously you want to avoid those medical schools anyway), provided you meet the minimum grade it doesn't matter what grade you actually got, so having an A* wouldn't be any better than having a C. You could probably prepare in time for this summer's GCSE sitting. The harder part might be finding an exam centre and making the necessary arrangements to sit the actual exam in the first place.

In any case, however long it takes it's probably a minimum requirement you need for most jobs outside medicine, and evidently would be advisable to do for medicine as well. So just do it anyway; you can't change what happened in the past so you can just now remedy that by retaking it (however many times may be necessary). It's a tick box so just, do what you need to do in order to tick it.
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medicphd
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#15
(Original post by GlueSniffer)
So realistically , I have very little chance. Lol this has been quite eye opening.

I would think my exceptional law degree would allow me to walk into any GEM course but it seems i was very naive.Thanks for taking the time to write this up aswell.
Hi there, just to reiterate what a lot of people have said already - medical schools have so many highly qualified people that they make no exceptions. They set a minimum requirement and anyone who doesn't meet this gets automatically rejected. Even if you've shown your academic prowess elsewhere.

As an example, I am currently doing a PhD within the medical sciences at a top uni and I have an MSc in genetics, however because of my undergrad degree (2:2), there are only 5 unis I can apply to.

But if it's something you really want to do, there are ways to be able to do it!
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L-K
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#16
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#16
(Original post by medicphd)
Hi there, just to reiterate what a lot of people have said already - medical schools have so many highly qualified people that they make no exceptions. They set a minimum requirement and anyone who doesn't meet this gets automatically rejected. Even if you've shown your academic prowess elsewhere.

As an example, I am currently doing a PhD within the medical sciences at a top uni and I have an MSc in genetics, however because of my undergrad degree (2:2), there are only 5 unis I can apply to.

But if it's something you really want to do, there are ways to be able to do it!
Yes I definitely agree with this. I have a degree in biochemistry (2.1) and was considering GEM but as my a level grades were only BBC (I was really lazy) I was hugely restricted on which universities I could apply for, despite the fact that at that time I was going to apply I was actually teaching A level Chemistry and Biology to A* level.
Universities don't care about the exceptions, they get so many applicants that they need these cut offs!
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Democracy
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#17
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#17
(Original post by GlueSniffer)
Okay thanks for taking the time to write this,

Can I ask though , what would be the point in doing my english GCSE's again when I did very good in a writing-style degree(law)?
I can see where you're coming from but the rule with medical admissions is take it or leave it

But if you didn't want to do it you've still got four choices.
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harrysbar
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#18
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#18
(Original post by GlueSniffer)
Okay thanks for taking the time to write this,

Can I ask though , what would be the point in doing my english GCSE's again when I did very good in a writing-style degree(law)?
Tbh you might have got your Law degree at a very poor uni. GCSEs are a more standardised way of assessing a person's ability in say English compared to other people in the country taking exactly the same exam
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Ibs223
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#19
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#19
(Original post by ecolier)
Ok so here are the GEM courses:
- Birmingham: needs a life science subject
- Cambridge: any subject but needs AAA at A-Levels
- Cardiff: any subject but BBC / ABC at A-Levels (for applicants in Wales)
- KCL: needs a bioscience subject
- Liverpool (not running 2022 entry ? 2023 entry): needs biological, biomedical or health science plus BBB at A-Levels
- Newcastle: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Nottingham: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Oxford: applied or experimental science and AAB in A-Levels (A / A* Chemistry)
- QMUL: bioscience or other science + A-Level / AS-Level Grade C Biology and/or Chemistry or non-science degree + A-Level / AS-Level Grade B Biology or Chemistry and one other science
- Sheffield: needs life sciences plus BBB at A-Levels
- Southampton: any subject, but needs at least Grade C GCSE in English, Maths, Chemistry and Biology
- ScotGEM: any subject but needs Grade B or above in Chemistry + GCSE Grade B Maths
- SGUL: any subject, no A-Level requirements
- Swansea: any subject, GCSE Grade C in English and Maths
- Ulster Uni: any subject, GCSE Grade C in English
- Warwick: any subject, no A-Level requirements

I have bolded and underlined the ones you could potentially apply to - assuming your Maths and English aren't the Grade C in GCSE.

As you can see, you can only apply to 4 medicine courses and there are literally only 4 you can apply to. It's risky.

Have you considered alternatives, like Physician Associate? It's very, very similar to being a junior doctor. https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...cian-associate
For physician associate you need a bioscience or healthcare related degree to enter, so I’m assuming that wouldn’t be an option
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ecolier
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Ibs223)
For physician associate you need a bioscience or healthcare related degree to enter, so I’m assuming that wouldn’t be an option
There are a few courses that do not strictly require it - but you will need "extensive" healthcare experience or having done a science subject at A-Levels.

I raised this point due to it being less competitive than GEM.

Also, have you yourself decided whether to do GEM or PA? I am still awaiting a reply from you on your other thread: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...864&highlight=
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