Kenan_N_Kel
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
My question is this,

Given im a mature student, what universities are basically no point applying for. I have heard id never get into Oxford which is a given. Any others?

Whats the best unis for chinese while at the same time accepting mature students?
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Kenan_N_Kel
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#2
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Wokeaijile)
学中文太难了, 选择别的吧
have no idea what you said..

I want to learn Chinese. Never said i started.
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artful_lounger
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Oxford do accept mature students, and in fact have an entire college exclusively for mature students (undergraduates and postgraduates)....so no idea why you're writing that off. In any case in general good options probably include Oxford, Cambridge, SOAS, and Leeds. Apparently Edinburgh has a decent Chinese department but I only know of what Japanese is like there, but from what I've heard the students enjoy their time in the department there.

Something to note though is that basically all unis will want to see some evidence of recent academic study within the last three years. This could be an Access to HE course, OU modules, A-levels (often mature students do these by distance learning), etc, etc. Since Chinese courses normally have no subject specific prerequisites there is no reason to prefer one option over another necessarily. That said they may want to see some evidence of language learning ability as well so if you are able to pursue some study option which includes language learning, or do some formal language study (which awards some kind of certificate or similar) alongside that might be ideal.

Bear in mind also a languages degree (including Chinese) at uni is not purely a language learning course/qualification, and normally at least half of the degree will be the academic "studies" relating to that language and countries speaking it. This can include the literature, (art) history, politics, culture, religion(s), etc; basically any humanities or social science approach is in principle possible. Different unis have different emphases in this regard - Oxford is very heavy on literature for example, and includes classical Chinese as a required part of the course. SOAS has that as an option although has a lot of modern geopolitical/social scientific approaches/options as well, and in their religions/philosophies department a variety of options in e.g. Taoism, Buddhism, etc.

So firstly in your recent academic study some traditionally academic essay based subjects may also be relevant (note Oxford and Cambridge I believe would normally require you submit with your application an essay written as part of a course you're taking that has been marked by a teacher/tutor). Secondly, you should also explore the different courses on offer to see what courses best match your interest(s). If you're very interested in classical Chinese, and the Chinese literary tradition and intellectual history then Oxford might be one of your best options.

Also look to see if it is possible to take another language and what options there are for that; for example at Cambridge you can normally only study Chinese by itself, while at Oxford you can study it "sole" or take a subsidiary language (I believe among other options Tibetan, Sanskrit, and Japanese may be offered for this). SOAS has a variety of languages available and you may be able to take some options in another language (all the same languages as Oxford except, plus many more; these wouldn't form part of your degree title though and would just be optional modules. SOAS has also in the past offered Cantonese and Hokkien although I think they aren't currently available). This might be something that you want to pursue, or want to keep the option to potentially explore later.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 month ago
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artful_lounger
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Wokeaijile)
The only way a university could realistically offer you Chinese and another language is if they dilute the material whereby at the end of the course you'd be lucky to pass HSK 6. Which by no means makes you fluent in Chinese.
It's pretty uncommon to be fair, at SOAS you can just take optional modules in other languages alongside the usual Chinese language courses (in place of options in e.g. literature, culture, etc, I believe), while at Oxford the choice is between doing additional "Chinese Studies" papers or a language (which is a "minor" essentially).

I believe your point is why Cambridge do not generally allow it to be combined with another language (they exceptionally sometimes permit students to combine Chinese and Japanese but only if they have substantial prior experience of one or both languages).
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