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ACCA after Access course

Hi. I have done GCSE maths and English, both with grade C. I have also done Level 2 and Level 3 Health and social care with a distinction and I have also done Access to HE diploma (Sciences), in which i achieved distinction as well. which is equivalent to A levels. I want to do ACCA as an undergraduate but I don't know where to apply and will I have to apply for a degree or a diploma? I tried researching, but all I found was diplomas or postgraduate degrees. Could someone please guide me in the right direction. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.
Reply 1
Hi - ACCA is a professional qualification not a university course. There are university courses which would get you exemptions from ACCA exams - is that what you are looking for?

there are other non university routes to study for ACCA exams.
Reply 2
Original post by ajj2000
Hi - ACCA is a professional qualification not a university course. There are university courses which would get you exemptions from ACCA exams - is that what you are looking for?

there are other non university routes to study for ACCA exams.

Yes. Hi. So where do I need to apply to be able to.do ACCA? I mean I can't find an institute for this. I don't know where or how to get started with it. Do I need to do diplomas (level 3,4, 5 and so on)? Because I have seen masters degree for ACCA but haven't seen a Bachelors degree for it. Which is confusing. If you know anything about it, could you please clarify. Thankyou.
You apply for a training contract with a firm of chartered accountants. You pass your ACCA exams with them. If you have an accountancy degree you may be able to claim a certain number of exemptions.
Reply 4
Original post by Nobody2u
You apply for a training contract with a firm of chartered accountants. You pass your ACCA exams with them. If you have an accountancy degree you may be able to claim a certain number of exemptions.

Means I will have to work and study at the same time. Can I not do the theory first with some uni or academy and then do the practical work afterwards?
Reply 5
Original post by uma2010
Yes. Hi. So where do I need to apply to be able to.do ACCA? I mean I can't find an institute for this. I don't know where or how to get started with it. Do I need to do diplomas (level 3,4, 5 and so on)? Because I have seen masters degree for ACCA but haven't seen a Bachelors degree for it. Which is confusing. If you know anything about it, could you please clarify. Thankyou.

I’ll write some notes when I get home.
You can get some exemptions at uni but not all. The point of professional exams is to get real life experience at the same time. If you work for one of the larger companies you can have client time and exam periods separated, typically spending a couple of months a year during the training contract with a college to prepare for exams and then the rest of the year working in the office or at clients. Smaller practices can't always allow this, so you balance client based work with exam preparation. The big 4 in London normally separate client and exam periods.
Reply 7
Original post by Nobody2u
You can get some exemptions at uni but not all. The point of professional exams is to get real life experience at the same time. If you work for one of the larger companies you can have client time and exam periods separated, typically spending a couple of months a year during the training contract with a college to prepare for exams and then the rest of the year working in the office or at clients. Smaller practices can't always allow this, so you balance client based work with exam preparation. The big 4 in London normally separate client and exam periods.

Ok thankyou for all the help. Do you think it would be a better idea to do Bachelors in accounting and then doing ACCA? Or shall I start ACCA without doing Bachelors?
Will there be any difference in both situations? Will it take more time for me.to complete ACCA if I did Bachelors first? Or will it be a benefit? Or does it not matter.
I just want to know the best route for it as I haven't studied anything related to accounting before, I want to know the basics too... and I don't know what will be the best route for me.
Reply 8
Hi



ACCA is a professional institute - https://www.accaglobal.com/gb/en.html

To join you need to pass a series of exams (13 in total). You can attend specialist college courses (Kaplan and BPP are the best known but there are loads of others and free, online resources). Lots of people have their courses paid for by their employers but you can study independently.

Should you prefer to start with the university route you could look at undergrad degrees in accounting/ accounting and finance and check how many ACCA exams these cover.
Original post by uma2010
Ok thankyou for all the help. Do you think it would be a better idea to do Bachelors in accounting and then doing ACCA? Or shall I start ACCA without doing Bachelors?
Will there be any difference in both situations? Will it take more time for me.to complete ACCA if I did Bachelors first? Or will it be a benefit? Or does it not matter.
I just want to know the best route for it as I haven't studied anything related to accounting before, I want to know the basics too... and I don't know what will be the best route for me.


Whether you do a bachelor's in accounting or not is entirely up to you.I personally didn't and got first time passes in all my professional exams whereas I know many people who did accounting degrees and didn't make it through the professional exams. With the degree you may get some exemptions but tbh not enough in my opinion to make it worth studying accounting at uni for 3 years. If you are passionate about the academic side of accounting then why not, but otherwise any good degree will let you into a career in the field and after a couple of months working it's almost impossible to know who did, or who didn't do an accounting degree.
Reply 10
Original post by Nobody2u
Whether you do a bachelor's in accounting or not is entirely up to you.I personally didn't and got first time passes in all my professional exams whereas I know many people who did accounting degrees and didn't make it through the professional exams. With the degree you may get some exemptions but tbh not enough in my opinion to make it worth studying accounting at uni for 3 years. If you are passionate about the academic side of accounting then why not, but otherwise any good degree will let you into a career in the field and after a couple of months working it's almost impossible to know who did, or who didn't do an accounting degree.

Thankyou so much for all the help. I really appreciate it. It was all very helpful. Thankyou again for clarifying all my questions.
You're welcome ☺️

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