Accelerated (Graduate-entry) Medicine at Oxbridge

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BrightBlueStar11
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#1
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#1
Do Oxford and Cambridge University have GCSE requirements apart from English and Maths at a grade of 5?

Also, what's the difference between the undergraduate and graduate ones? Is it most competitive? Or more respectable than one another?
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Democracy
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#2
(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
Do Oxford and Cambridge University have GCSE requirements apart from English and Maths at a grade of 5?

Also, what's the difference between the undergraduate and graduate ones? Is it most competitive? Or more respectable than one another?
You can check entry requirements here: https://www.medschools.ac.uk/studyin...entry-medicine

The standard entry and graduate entry courses are the same except the graduate course has longer terms and shorter holidays. GEM is more competitive. There is no difference in respectability and they both lead to the same qualification.
Last edited by Democracy; 7 months ago
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ecolier
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
Do Oxford and Cambridge University have GCSE requirements apart from English and Maths at a grade of 5?

Also, what's the difference between the undergraduate and graduate ones? Is it most competitive? Or more respectable than one another?
Oxford is one of the most GCSE heavy med school - esepecially for their undergrad course.

The difference is of course (1) the course is 4 years instead of 6 years and (2) different entry requirements.

No medical degree is "more respectable" than another, all UK med degrees are the same for clinical training purposes.

So pick your med school according to your stats, and not because of rankings, perceived prestige or Russell Group.
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BrightBlueStar11
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(Original post by ecolier)
Oxford is one of the most GCSE heavy med school - esepecially for their undergrad course.

The difference is of course (1) the course is 4 years instead of 6 years and (2) different entry requirements.

No medical degree is "more respectable" than another, all UK med degrees are the same for clinical training purposes.

So pick your med school according to your stats, and not because of rankings, perceived prestige or Russell Group.
Does Oxford have GCSE requirement for a graduate-entry course tho?
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ecolier
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
Does Oxford have GCSE requirement for a graduate-entry course tho?
Why are you asking? Are you a grad?

I spotted from your profile that you are still at school,

Never ever do a degree with the sole aim for graduate entry medicine. It'll take longer, cost more and (most importantly) will be much, much more competitive.
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username5706823
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(Original post by ecolier)

No medical degree is "more respectable" than another, all UK med degrees are the same for clinical training purposes.

So pick your med school according to your stats, and not because of rankings, perceived prestige or Russell Group.
If you get £1 every time you say that you'll be richer than Elon Musk by now.
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BrightBlueStar11
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(Original post by summerbirdreads)
If you get £1 every time you say that you'll be richer than Elon Musk by now.
LOL
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BrightBlueStar11
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I've noticed someone who did both degrees of Masters and the accelerated medicine course.

Will it be possible to apply and study both subjects? (E.g. second undergraduate or other academic degrees such as PhD + accelerated medicine)
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ecolier
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
I've noticed someone who did both degrees of Masters and the accelerated medicine course.

Will it be possible to apply and study both subjects? (E.g. second undergraduate or other academic degrees such as PhD + accelerated medicine)
You can't do both at the same time, no.

At some undergrad medicine courses, you can intercalate a masters.

But what's the point? For specialty training to become more competitive? It's not worth that many points if that's your intention.
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BrightBlueStar11
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(Original post by ecolier)
You can't do both at the same time, no.

At some undergrad medicine courses, you can intercalate a masters.

But what's the point? For specialty training to become more competitive? It's not worth that many points if that's your intention.
but i've literally seen someone on linkedin who had studied two subjects simultaneously as a graduate student? both graduate-entry medicine and PhD
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ecolier
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
but i've literally seen someone on linkedin who had studied two subjects simultaneously as a graduate student? both graduate-entry medicine and PhD
I wouldn't trust what I read on linkedin tbh, plus it's only one case - even if true.

GEM itself is already going to be action-packed, many people wouldn't have time to do much else.
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BrightBlueStar11
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The entry requirement for the graduate-entry (accelerated) medicine shows that GCSE biology is required.

Do they have any specific exam board they are looking for? e.g. AQA

Also, I realised that some subjects such as A-level chemistry needs experiments? Do GCSE biology also have such things or is it 100% exam?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
The entry requirement for the graduate-entry (accelerated) medicine shows that GCSE biology is required.

Do they have any specific exam board they are looking for? e.g. AQA

Also, I realised that some subjects such as A-level chemistry needs experiments? Do GCSE biology also have such things or is it 100% exam?
Why would you be looking at doing GEM if you're still at the GCSE/A level stage? If you want to do medicine, then do it as a first degree. Doing it as a grad is insanely more competitive, more difficult and generally not advisable.

Apply as a first undergrad, and do the right A levels to enable that.
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BrightBlueStar11
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Why would you be looking at doing GEM if you're still at the GCSE/A level stage? If you want to do medicine, then do it as a first degree. Doing it as a grad is insanely more competitive, more difficult and generally not advisable.

Apply as a first undergrad, and do the right A levels to enable that.
Im doing undergrad, and I recently decided to apply for it - do they have any specific exam board for biology?
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Reality Check
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#15
(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
do they have any specific exam board for biology?
No, of course not. A levels usually require any NEA (i.e. practical endorsement) to be passed.
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TheMedicOwl
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
Im doing undergrad, and I recently decided to apply for it - do they have any specific exam board for biology?
Not all GEM courses have a GCSE biology requirement. None of the ones I looked at did. Southampton wanted a B in double science, but they didn't say that one of those sciences had to be biology. Newcastle and Warwick didn't have any science requirements at GCSE.
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BrightBlueStar11
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(Original post by Incidentaloma)
Not all GEM courses have a GCSE biology requirement. None of the ones I looked at did. Southampton wanted a B in double science, but they didn't say that one of those sciences had to be biology. Newcastle and Warwick didn't have any science requirements at GCSE.
one of the GEM I am thinking of requires it. Do you know if it requires any courseworks or experiments? Or is it like 100% exam for both GCSE biology and chemistry?
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hungrysalamander
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Are you an international student since you don't have GCSE's. GCSE science is 100% exam but I think there are still required practicals you will need to do to help with the exam. The exam board you choose for GCSE's does not matter as most people don't get to pick an exam board when your school does it for you.
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medicphd
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
but i've literally seen someone on linkedin who had studied two subjects simultaneously as a graduate student? both graduate-entry medicine and PhD
It may be part of the MBBS/PhD course that is available to very few students and I believe (I could be wrong) is only available at Cambridge/Imperial/UCL. Typically, you would do your pre-clinical years, take 3 years out for your PhD, then go back into doing your clinical years. I've never met anyone doing it as a grad, but it may be available in a similar format. But again, very, very few people will do this.
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asclepeion
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#20
(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
one of the GEM I am thinking of requires it. Do you know if it requires any courseworks or experiments? Or is it like 100% exam for both GCSE biology and chemistry?
If you really want to know and can't find it on the website, you should just email your queries and get the answer directly from the source.
But why are you still thinking of GEM when you haven't started an undergrad degree....?
Judging by your other posts, it seems you want to study a whole bunch of other degrees as well like maths or law and seem specifically fixated on Oxford rather than an actual course.....?
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