Earnings of commercial crime/fraud barrister?

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RetroSPECT3.0
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I've heard that criminal law pays very poorly on one end and commercial pays very well at the other end of the Bar- where would the earnings of a barrister practising, or rather, specialising in, corporate/financial crime lie on the scale?
Would they still have roughly the high earning potential as a regular commercial chancery barrister?
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civic7
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
I've heard that criminal law pays very poorly on one end and commercial pays very well at the other end of the Bar- where would the earnings of a barrister practising, or rather, specialising in, corporate/financial crime lie on the scale?
Would they still have roughly the high earning potential as a regular commercial chancery barrister?
not usually the high earning potential. if i remember correctly from when i was studying law; a criminal barrister at a good set made about 25-40 000 in the first 5 years and often didn't exceed that amount by much in the next 10. whereas commercial barristers were on 55 000 or so during pupillage or soon after and going on to earn respectively more.
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RetroSPECT3.0
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(Original post by civic7)
not usually the high earning potential. if i remember correctly from when i was studying law; a criminal barrister at a good set made about 25-40 000 in the first 5 years and often didn't exceed that amount by much in the next 10. whereas commercial barristers were on 55 000 or so during pupillage or soon after and going on to earn respectively more.
So where would those practising commercial crime/fraud fit in? Will their earnings match the criminal barristers or the commercial barristers?
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civic7
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
So where would those practising commercial crime/fraud fit in? Will their earnings match the criminal barristers or the commercial barristers?
some chambers (commercial) might act on behalf of clients for commercial fraud. in that case the remuneration would be greater. some criminal act on behalf of the crown.
Last edited by civic7; 7 months ago
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legalhelp
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(Original post by civic7)
some chambers (commercial) might act on behalf of clients for commercial fraud. in that case the remuneration would be greater. some criminal act on behalf of the crown.
Not sure this poster really understands what they’re talking about…

OP, there are a few criminal sets, usually the higher quality ones, where barristers can make decent money doing the kind of work you are asking about. But what you should understand is there is a very limited amount of it to go round compared to regular criminal work, so the competition to get it is intense. I certainly wouldn’t be going into criminal law thinking you’ll automatically be able to do well-paid white collar or corporate crime work, particularly in your earlier years.

Having said that, if you can get it, it’s vastly better paid than publicly-funded defence work. Your effective hourly rate for a legal aid defence brief might be as little as £10 an hour (pre-tax/chambers rent/other expenses), whereas a white collar matter charged at an hourly rate might make you 15 or 20 times that amount. Done right, criminal barristers can use this sort of privately-funded work effectively to subsidise their publicly-funded practice.
Last edited by legalhelp; 7 months ago
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RetroSPECT3.0
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(Original post by legalhelp)
Not sure this poster really understands what they’re talking about…

OP, there are a few criminal sets, usually the higher quality ones, where barristers can make decent money doing the kind of work you are asking about. But what you should understand is there is a very limited amount of it to go round compared to regular criminal work, so the competition to get it is intense. I certainly wouldn’t be going into criminal law thinking you’ll automatically be able to do well-paid white collar or corporate crime work, particularly in your earlier years.

Having said that, if you can get it, it’s vastly better paid than publicly-funded defence work. Your effective hourly rate for a legal aid defence brief might be as little as £10 an hour (pre-tax/chambers rent/other expenses), whereas a white collar matter charged at an hourly rate might make you 15 or 20 times that amount. Done right, criminal barristers can use this sort of privately-funded work effectively to subsidise their publicly-funded practice.
Ah, I see so when client/firm wants representation for something white collar related, they instruct the criminal sets rather than commercial ones?
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Augustino D
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
I've heard that criminal law pays very poorly on one end and commercial pays very well at the other end of the Bar- where would the earnings of a barrister practising, or rather, specialising in, corporate/financial crime lie on the scale?
Would they still have roughly the high earning potential as a regular commercial chancery barrister?
Another poster has made the exact same point I wanted to make - you would likely end up working at a criminal set, not a commercial one, even though some commercial sets do dabble in criminal matters from time to time.
https://chambers.com/legal-rankings/...#39; />11841:2
https://www.legal500.com/c/london-ba...nvestigations/

The civil fraud rankings look very different and have the usual commercial names up top:
https://chambers.com/legal-rankings/...#39; />11841:2
Last edited by Augustino D; 7 months ago
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legalhelp
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
Ah, I see so when client/firm wants representation for something white collar related, they instruct the criminal sets rather than commercial ones?
Put it this way: if it’s a criminal process the client is involved in, they would be a bit of an idiot not to get a criminal lawyer! Doesn’t stop the odd civil practitioner thinking they can muddle their way through criminal procedure though…
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