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A level French

If I will study a level french. The exam board is eduqas should I use the Aqa books as eduqas have none.

Also anyone who studies a level french and is not a native speaker how was your experience
Thank you
I don’t know as I do aqa but maybe ask the teachers before you chose the teachers may know some books you do not know of yet
Reply 2
Original post by teddybear4444h
I don’t know as I do aqa but maybe ask the teachers before you chose the teachers may know some books you do not know of yet

Thanks how are you finding a level french
Original post by Harrysja
Thanks how are you finding a level french

It’s ok just a lot more focus on pronunciation than gcse and only 2 others in my class at one point it was just me so that’s a lot better
If u like grammar it’s great and learning about francophone countries and comparing countries
Reply 4
Original post by teddybear4444h
It’s ok just a lot more focus on pronunciation than gcse and only 2 others in my class at one point it was just me so that’s a lot better
If u like grammar it’s great and learning about francophone countries and comparing countries

Thanks are the grade boundaries really high for an a level in mfl
Hi im in year 13 and I do Eduqas A-level French.

We use the AQA A-Level French textbooks for our course and we also read online articles about the topics we're covering too.

I'm not a native speaker and I chose French because it came naturally to me and I haven't found the A-Level that difficult to be honest. The content is similar to GCSE (you have to know GCSE grammar and to some extent the vocabulary because that forms the foundation of the course) and there is some overlap in the topics too (e.g. family relations). There are new grammar points to learn and more vocabulary/different topics and you study them in a bit more depth but it is not so difficult if you have a good foundation at GCSE. Out of all of my subjects, I find French the easiest to get a good grade in; if you keep up with the vocabulary and grammar then it's not hard to stay on track.

I wouldn't say that the grade boundaries are awfully high. Most of the people in my class have been predicted A*s and got those in our mocks last year. The format/difficulty of the exams is quite similar to GCSE and the listening/translation is not that much harder. The writing may seem difficult as you're writing essays in French on a film/book but with practice it's not that hard. The speaking exam is longer but if you have regular practice speaking on the cards then it really isn't that much different to GCSE.

Hope this helps.
Reply 6
Original post by Astraea.l
Hi im in year 13 and I do Eduqas A-level French.

We use the AQA A-Level French textbooks for our course and we also read online articles about the topics we're covering too.

I'm not a native speaker and I chose French because it came naturally to me and I haven't found the A-Level that difficult to be honest. The content is similar to GCSE (you have to know GCSE grammar and to some extent the vocabulary because that forms the foundation of the course) and there is some overlap in the topics too (e.g. family relations). There are new grammar points to learn and more vocabulary/different topics and you study them in a bit more depth but it is not so difficult if you have a good foundation at GCSE. Out of all of my subjects, I find French the easiest to get a good grade in; if you keep up with the vocabulary and grammar then it's not hard to stay on track.

I wouldn't say that the grade boundaries are awfully high. Most of the people in my class have been predicted A*s and got those in our mocks last year. The format/difficulty of the exams is quite similar to GCSE and the listening/translation is not that much harder. The writing may seem difficult as you're writing essays in French on a film/book but with practice it's not that hard. The speaking exam is longer but if you have regular practice speaking on the cards then it really isn't that much different to GCSE.

Hope this helps.

Hi thanks this was really useful
I have 2 more questions if you don’t mind
What grade did you get at gcse
And also do you use the Aqa book for vocab or is there anything on quizlet or does your school provide vocab booklets
Reply 7
Hey, I did AQA French and got an 8 at GCSE and A at A-Level.
I think it's a fair amount of work and it was my most difficult subject since I found that it was the one which I had to spend the most time on, and there is never an 'end point' to it as such, you just have to keep practising vocal/grammar throughout your course.
However, if you enjoy the subject and found the grammar side of it manageable at GCSE, it's a great A-Level to choose :smile:
Original post by Harrysja
Hi thanks this was really useful
I have 2 more questions if you don’t mind
What grade did you get at gcse
And also do you use the Aqa book for vocab or is there anything on quizlet or does your school provide vocab booklets

Hi I got a 9 at GCSE and we use the AQA book for vocabulary. There are a lot of sets on Quizlet and Memrise that have the A-level vocabulary. The school only provides vocabulary sheets for essay phrases but the main vocabulary is from the textbook. It is good to try and learn as much vocabulary as you can (relevant to the topics and just generally) as the exams can include random vocabulary sometimes.
Original post by Harrysja
Thanks are the grade boundaries really high for an a level in mfl

I’m not yet sure as my mocks aren’t until next month but my teacher says they’re reasonable and questions seem to be easier than gcse. Translations to French come with a text with most of the vocabulary in
Reply 10
Also what does the speaking at a level involve

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