Am I asking for too much for a job?

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Marshall0307
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#1
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#1
I'm a Mathematics Graduate with a first class degree and I struggled finding a graduate job for after my final year. I ended up on a teacher training course as a last resort because my family expected me to be doing something with my degree. I always knew it was not really what I wanted, and now that I've done a few months of my PGCE I definitely know its not what I want to do.

My main issue with it is that I'm constantly taking work home, and I really don't like working outside of my allocated hours. For me, the workplace is for work, and home is for relaxation and comfort. I am also at the point now where I dont want to be on some long graduate training scheme where I'm forced to study for yet another qualification that I don't care for.

I just want a job where I go into work, do my hours, and then go home. I am not bothered about industry, as I've never really known what I wanted to do. All I want is a healthy work-life balance and enough money to support myself.

Am I asking for too much? What jobs are out there that are relevent to, or achievable with my degree?
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threeportdrift
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Marshall0307)
I'm a Mathematics Graduate with a first class degree and I struggled finding a graduate job for after my final year. I ended up on a teacher training course as a last resort because my family expected me to be doing something with my degree. I always knew it was not really what I wanted, and now that I've done a few months of my PGCE I definitely know its not what I want to do.

My main issue with it is that I'm constantly taking work home, and I really don't like working outside of my allocated hours. For me, the workplace is for work, and home is for relaxation and comfort. I am also at the point now where I dont want to be on some long graduate training scheme where I'm forced to study for yet another qualification that I don't care for.

I just want a job where I go into work, do my hours, and then go home. I am not bothered about industry, as I've never really known what I wanted to do. All I want is a healthy work-life balance and enough money to support myself.

Am I asking for too much? What jobs are out there that are relevent to, or achievable with my degree?
You may be asking too much, it depends on the detail in your not wanting to take work home, a healthy work-life balance and enough money to support yourself.

Although there are sectoral differences and aptitude barriers etc, salary v ‘hard work’ is a pretty simple balancing act. If you only want to put in an average amount of work you will only get an average salary, because there will always be someone who is prepared to take work home, do extra hours and therefore earn that promotion etc.

If that’s not for you, find your generic niche (general administrator, basic accountant etc) and find yourself a job in a local small to medium sized organisation or the NHS, local council or university and bob along.
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Marshall0307
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#3
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#3
(Original post by threeportdrift)
You may be asking too much, it depends on the detail in your not wanting to take work home, a healthy work-life balance and enough money to support yourself.

Although there are sectoral differences and aptitude barriers etc, salary v ‘hard work’ is a pretty simple balancing act. If you only want to put in an average amount of work you will only get an average salary, because there will always be someone who is prepared to take work home, do extra hours and therefore earn that promotion etc.

If that’s not for you, find your generic niche (general administrator, basic accountant etc) and find yourself a job in a local small to medium sized organisation or the NHS, local council or university and bob along.
Thanks for the response. Allow me to give more details on the first part of the response.

Not wanting to take work home means exactly what it says. When I am at work, I will happily give my 110% efforts to the job, but if my hours are 9am-5pm, then when the clock strikes 5pm, I don't want to think about work anymore for that day. I don't want to get home and have to do something related to work. Similarly, every day at 9am, I'm fully prepared to give my all for the days work that lies ahead, and for that period of time, my day will be dedicated to that work.

This is also what I mean by a healthy work life balance. To me this means that the work stays in the workplace, and my personal life stays personal. I don't want a situation where the only people I socialise with are those who I work with, but I also want a job where I can go to have a duty to perform for 40 hours or so a week.

When I say I want enough money to support myself, I want to be able to have enough to rent and maintain a small house or flat, have a car (even if its a very cheap car) and the ability to go grocery shopping and occasionally go out with some friends for a meal or buy a book to read or a game to play. I'm not bothered about having a mansion or a fancy sports car. I don't care about going on foreign holidays every year or about having the latest mobile phone every year. Ideally I'd like to build up to home ownership and having a family, but I'm willing to wait a few years for those things.
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threeportdrift
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Marshall0307)
Thanks for the response. Allow me to give more details on the first part of the response.

Not wanting to take work home means exactly what it says. When I am at work, I will happily give my 110% efforts to the job, but if my hours are 9am-5pm, then when the clock strikes 5pm, I don't want to think about work anymore for that day. I don't want to get home and have to do something related to work. Similarly, every day at 9am, I'm fully prepared to give my all for the days work that lies ahead, and for that period of time, my day will be dedicated to that work.

This is also what I mean by a healthy work life balance. To me this means that the work stays in the workplace, and my personal life stays personal. I don't want a situation where the only people I socialise with are those who I work with, but I also want a job where I can go to have a duty to perform for 40 hours or so a week.

When I say I want enough money to support myself, I want to be able to have enough to rent and maintain a small house or flat, have a car (even if its a very cheap car) and the ability to go grocery shopping and occasionally go out with some friends for a meal or buy a book to read or a game to play. I'm not bothered about having a mansion or a fancy sports car. I don't care about going on foreign holidays every year or about having the latest mobile phone every year. Ideally I'd like to build up to home ownership and having a family, but I'm willing to wait a few years for those things.
Then go into a very large, very admin heavy organisation, probably in the public sector NHS in a non-medical role, local government, or a local university. Alternatively blue collar work, retail, warehouse etc. Anything in the private sector, in a managerial role will eventually find 9-5 tiresome and you will find it harder to sustain a long-term job in any competitive industry.
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londonmyst
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#5
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#5
It depends on your income expectations, location, standard of living and the direction of your future plans.

Graduate schemes are very competitive.
I've never gone down this route because I know it would only be a waste of my time.
The competitive element for graduate jobs is most likely to become even more intense after the pandemic is over and many businesses go bankrupt or have to bring in massive redundancies.
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Gidray
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Marshall0307)
I'm a Mathematics Graduate with a first class degree and I struggled finding a graduate job for after my final year. I ended up on a teacher training course as a last resort because my family expected me to be doing something with my degree. I always knew it was not really what I wanted, and now that I've done a few months of my PGCE I definitely know its not what I want to do.

My main issue with it is that I'm constantly taking work home, and I really don't like working outside of my allocated hours. For me, the workplace is for work, and home is for relaxation and comfort. I am also at the point now where I dont want to be on some long graduate training scheme where I'm forced to study for yet another qualification that I don't care for.

I just want a job where I go into work, do my hours, and then go home. I am not bothered about industry, as I've never really known what I wanted to do. All I want is a healthy work-life balance and enough money to support myself.

Am I asking for too much? What jobs are out there that are relevent to, or achievable with my degree?
The family's expectations and their ignorance is what is affecting you. I also have parents that haven't been to university before and I study aeronautics and astronautics, so they are expecting me to be rich after my degree and have high expectations on the jobs that I'll end up getting which is ignorant and childish. I am incredibly sorry to disappoint them, but the job market is too competitive and applying for graduate schemes is generally pointless unless you are someone who can get a first in a degree or has lots of relevant work experience, but even then it's still going to be incredibly competitive because of the long recruitment process that requires you to have good preparation at each stage.

In my opinion, going to uni is not worth it. You'll end up in £40,000 debt, likely to ruin your mental health and you won't be guaranteed a job in the end because of the fierce competition. I am in my final year at uni and that's the way that I see things. I think doing an apprenticeship or a degree apprenticeship would've been a better choice regarding your interests, because you would've already received training and you would've worked as you have wanted. Since you're studying a maths degree, you still have many options. You can enter finance, data science, computing and technology. I would've suggested to look into your careers and employability service at your university because they could've pointed you in the right direction. There are lots of graduate jobs that accept you with a 2.1 in any subject, so you still have lots of options.

The final thing is that, whatever job you're going to end up doing, you will need to have training for it. This is not only true for graduate schemes but any other role where you are an associate or just starting. You will get training and earn a qualification to go with the job you're doing. You won't avoid it, because there's no single job in the country that will only expect you to have maths. Even the lowest level jobs in retail and warehousing require you to have training and work towards a relevant qualification.
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trapking
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Gidray)
The family's expectations and their ignorance is what is affecting you. I also have parents that haven't been to university before and I study aeronautics and astronautics, so they are expecting me to be rich after my degree and have high expectations on the jobs that I'll end up getting which is ignorant and childish. I am incredibly sorry to disappoint them, but the job market is too competitive and applying for graduate schemes is generally pointless unless you are someone who can get a first in a degree or has lots of relevant work experience, but even then it's still going to be incredibly competitive because of the long recruitment process that requires you to have good preparation at each stage.

In my opinion, going to uni is not worth it. You'll end up in £40,000 debt, likely to ruin your mental health and you won't be guaranteed a job in the end because of the fierce competition. I am in my final year at uni and that's the way that I see things. I think doing an apprenticeship or a degree apprenticeship would've been a better choice regarding your interests, because you would've already received training and you would've worked as you have wanted. Since you're studying a maths degree, you still have many options. You can enter finance, data science, computing and technology. I would've suggested to look into your careers and employability service at your university because they could've pointed you in the right direction. There are lots of graduate jobs that accept you with a 2.1 in any subject, so you still have lots of options.

The final thing is that, whatever job you're going to end up doing, you will need to have training for it. This is not only true for graduate schemes but any other role where you are an associate or just starting. You will get training and earn a qualification to go with the job you're doing. You won't avoid it, because there's no single job in the country that will only expect you to have maths. Even the lowest level jobs in retail and warehousing require you to have training and work towards a relevant qualification.
Engineering is such a dead career huh?
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Reality Check
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Gidray)
In my opinion, going to uni is not worth it. You'll end up in £40,000 debt, likely to ruin your mental health and you won't be guaranteed a job in the end because of the fierce competition. I am in my final year at uni and that's the way that I see things.
None of these things are peculiar or specific to 'going to university'. In particularly, it is not remotely 'likely to ruin your mental health': most people's mental health is just fine.

I appreciate this is your opinion of things - an opinion you're perfectly entitled to - but it might be more helpful for the OP and others reading this not to make sweeping, dramatic and rather hysterical judgements of something so diverse and variable as 'going to university'.
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trapking
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Marshall0307)
I'm a Mathematics Graduate with a first class degree and I struggled finding a graduate job for after my final year. I ended up on a teacher training course as a last resort because my family expected me to be doing something with my degree. I always knew it was not really what I wanted, and now that I've done a few months of my PGCE I definitely know its not what I want to do.

My main issue with it is that I'm constantly taking work home, and I really don't like working outside of my allocated hours. For me, the workplace is for work, and home is for relaxation and comfort. I am also at the point now where I dont want to be on some long graduate training scheme where I'm forced to study for yet another qualification that I don't care for.

I just want a job where I go into work, do my hours, and then go home. I am not bothered about industry, as I've never really known what I wanted to do. All I want is a healthy work-life balance and enough money to support myself.

Am I asking for too much? What jobs are out there that are relevent to, or achievable with my degree?
Youre not asking for too much at all. I know exactly what you mean. I had a job where i would take work home and it was hell tbh (I eventually left it and it was such a happy decision).
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Gidray
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Reality Check)
None of these things are peculiar or specific to 'going to university'. In particularly, it is not remotely 'likely to ruin your mental health': most people's mental health is just fine.

I appreciate this is your opinion of things - an opinion you're perfectly entitled to - but it might be more helpful for the OP and others reading this not to make sweeping, dramatic and rather hysterical judgements of something so diverse and variable as 'going to university'.
Fair enough and if you go to university just for the sake of going to university and don't actually care about getting a job in the end then it won't have an effect on your mental health as you said. Some people go to university to get a third or a 2.2 and just have fun and mess around and go to parties, I know someone who studies psychology and has exactly this type of mindset, but if you're someone who is very serious about doing well and tries their hardest to beat the competiton, it can an effect on your mental health especially if you don't succeed 10 times. I know lots of people that developed mental health problems at university, including depression and anxiety, because the pressure to do well is immense and you're always forced to compare yourself to other people, because everyone is competing with each other for grad schemes.

Now, I am not saying you can't beat the competition. The OP has achieved a first in maths, so it still opens a lot of doors for her/him and they can try to get a graduate job. However, that also depends what the OP wants to do. If the OP was never interested in jobs that require a STEM degree, then what was the point in doing the degree? It's a massive waste of time. They should've done an apprenticeship and probably would've been happier.

(Original post by trapking)
Engineering is such a dead career huh?
It is. When I applied to university, I was told that a degree from a Russell Group uni will mean that you can do anything (especially from an engineering subject). That was the biggest lie I was told. I am now about to finish university and I see the reality behind the recruitment process and what these companies actually expect out you.
Last edited by Gidray; 4 months ago
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trapking
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Gidray)
Fair enough and if you go to university just for the sake of going to university and don't actually care about getting a job in the end then it won't have an effect on your mental health as you said. Some people go to university to get a third or a 2.2 and just have fun and mess around and go to parties, I know someone who studies psychology and has exactly this type of mindset, but if you're someone who is very serious about doing well and tries their hardest to beat the competiton, it can an effect on your mental health especially if you don't succeed 10 times. I know lots of people that developed mental health problems at university, including depression and anxiety, because the pressure to do well is immense and you're always forced to compare yourself to other people, because everyone is competing with each other for grad schemes.

Now, I am not saying you can't beat the competition. The OP has achieved a first in maths, so it still opens a lot of doors for her/him and they can try to get a graduate job. However, that also depends what the OP wants to do. If the OP was never interested in jobs that require a STEM degree, then what was the point in doing the degree? It's a massive waste of time. They should've done an apprenticeship and probably would've been happier.


It is. When I applied to university, I was told that a degree from a Russell Group uni will mean that you can do anything (especially from an engineering subject). That was the biggest lie I was told. I am now about to finish university and I see the reality behind the recruitment process and what these companies actually expect out you.
Im an engineer myself (had a couple of jobs in engineering now) and im leaving the career also! Youre not alone theres many of us lol.
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Thisismyunitsr
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Gidray)
The family's expectations and their ignorance is what is affecting you. I also have parents that haven't been to university before and I study aeronautics and astronautics, so they are expecting me to be rich after my degree and have high expectations on the jobs that I'll end up getting which is ignorant and childish. I am incredibly sorry to disappoint them, but the job market is too competitive and applying for graduate schemes is generally pointless unless you are someone who can get a first in a degree or has lots of relevant work experience, but even then it's still going to be incredibly competitive because of the long recruitment process that requires you to have good preparation at each stage.

In my opinion, going to uni is not worth it. You'll end up in £40,000 debt, likely to ruin your mental health and you won't be guaranteed a job in the end because of the fierce competition. I am in my final year at uni and that's the way that I see things. I think doing an apprenticeship or a degree apprenticeship would've been a better choice regarding your interests, because you would've already received training and you would've worked as you have wanted. Since you're studying a maths degree, you still have many options. You can enter finance, data science, computing and technology. I would've suggested to look into your careers and employability service at your university because they could've pointed you in the right direction. There are lots of graduate jobs that accept you with a 2.1 in any subject, so you still have lots of options.

The final thing is that, whatever job you're going to end up doing, you will need to have training for it. This is not only true for graduate schemes but any other role where you are an associate or just starting. You will get training and earn a qualification to go with the job you're doing. You won't avoid it, because there's no single job in the country that will only expect you to have maths. Even the lowest level jobs in retail and warehousing require you to have training and work towards a relevant qualification.
Best thing I’ve read on here in ten years. I wish we were honest with young people rather than just blindly telling them to ‘Go To UnI’!1!1!1!1!1!11!1!1!1!1!

I wish I’d have never even applied in the first place.
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rosy_posy
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Thisismyunitsr)
Best thing I’ve read on here in ten years. I wish we were honest with young people rather than just blindly telling them to ‘Go To UnI’!1!1!1!1!1!11!1!1!1!1!

I wish I’d have never even applied in the first place.
University is a route which benefits many people, though. Ultimately, it is up to the individual whether they choose to go or not.
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1secondsofvamps
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#14
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#14
University is neither good or bad- it ultimately depends on the individual, their needs and wants.

Teaching is definitely not for you then. It is one of those careers where you will need to work outside of school hours and that to-do list will always be never-ending. I'm a qualified teacher myself so I know how demanding the profession is. Don't stay in it just because you are pressured to by your parents. In the long-term it's just going to damage your mental health, plus, it's unfair on the pupils you're teaching.
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Gidray
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#15
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#15
(Original post by rosy_posy)
University is a route which benefits many people, though. Ultimately, it is up to the individual whether they choose to go or not.
That's true, but a lot of people put pressure on you (especially your parents) to go to university and everyone sees this as the best traditional route for being successful, which I think is completely false. I agree that getting GCSEs is essential, I agree that doing A-Levels or BTEC is also important. Going to university is where we start to disagree. My opinion is that getting on-hands experience with a company whilst studying is the best route for having a more successful career.

Ultimately, yes it depends on the individual. Some people do extremely well at university and are quite gifted individuals, but there are also a lot of people that end up dropping out or switching subjects and are struggling to keep up with everyone else in terms of workload. I am personally tired of university because I feel that now I am being forced formulas and equations down my throat without actually getting any practical experience. When I apply to do the job, who in the world is going to care that I know the ackeret's theory.
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rosy_posy
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#16
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#16
(Original post by Gidray)
My opinion is that getting on-hands experience with a company whilst studying is the best route for having a more successful career.
It depends on the type of job. A vocational route would work well for aspiring hairdressers or plumbers, but those planning to become dentists or architects would need a degree behind them in order to work in their chosen area.
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