Is there such thing as a 'dead-end' apprenticeship?

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Other_Owl
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#1
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#1
I'm aware that, Experience + Good apprenticeship equals better employment opportunities.
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dpsng
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#2
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depends on the type of apprenticeship tbf. If you do a degree apprenticeship its almost always better job opportunities than normal degree because of added experience alongside qualification. If you go for an apprenticeship with a very specific qualification then it may mean you cant branch out into other industries or job types. for example if you do an apprenticeship with architecture qualification getting a job in a different field would be more difficult than doing an apprenticeship in finance which has transferable skills.
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Chris2892
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It depends on a combination of your aspirations and career path.

I did a level 2, 3, 4, and 6 apprenticeship, changing employer after my level 3.

The level 3 job didn’t offer any education advancement after level 3. Internal promotion was limited because it was a small company of 15 people. Also, it was a rather niche trade and I would have struggled to find alternate employment.

However, since I aspired to further education, it gave me the experience and education to progress to a degree apprenticeship.

I work for a large company now where promotion is performance based, and the skills are very transferable to different departments and industry.
Last edited by Chris2892; 2 weeks ago
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Cancelled Alice
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Absolutely.
I’ve seen apprenticeships being offered for roles that could easily be learnt on the job such as cashier type roles or care work in some settings. The minimum wage for apprentices is set a lot lower than the minimum wage for under 18s- it’s a scam.
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Chris2892
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(Original post by Cancelled Alice)
Absolutely.
I’ve seen apprenticeships being offered for roles that could easily be learnt on the job such as cashier type roles or care work in some settings. The minimum wage for apprentices is set a lot lower than the minimum wage for under 18s- it’s a scam.
I think this can be relative.

There are some people out there who really need this sort of opportunity to get into work. Maybe people with minimal, poor, or no formal education.

I got kicked out of school and remember the days I repeatedly got rejected for interviews for simple shelve stacking and warehouse roles. My level 2 helped my move up education through the apprenticeship route to the point I’m now working at post graduate level and publishing research studies in journals.

It took me 10 years of part time study, but without that dead end level 2 and 3 apprenticeship, I’d probably be on the dole or stacking shelves to this day.

If an apprenticeship wage encourages employers to take a chance on people with poor to no education and zero experience, then I fully support it.
Last edited by Chris2892; 2 weeks ago
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Cancelled Alice
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#6
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(Original post by Chris2892)
I think this can be relative.

There are some people out there who really need this sort of opportunity to get into work. Maybe people with minimal, poor, or no formal education.

I got kicked out of school and remember the days I repeatedly got rejected for interviews for simple shelve stacking and warehouse roles. My level 2 helped my move up education through the apprenticeship route to the point I’m now working at post graduate level and publishing research studies in journals.

It took me 10 years of part time study, but without that dead end level 2 and 3 apprenticeship, I’d probably be on the dole or stacking shelves to this day.

If an apprenticeship wage encourages employers to take a chance on people with poor to no education and zero experience, then I fully support it.
I view the apprenticeship wage as being exploitative in many cases, especially when it’s in a job similar to the ones that I’ve already described. Of course employers take a risk when they recruit, training new staff takes time and money but many employment contracts allow for companies to get rid of employees during their first two years at will. There are other safeguards in place from the employers perspective.

I support apprenticeships that are designed to train people up to do job roles that you would require actual experience for.

I understand that there have been significant changes to the job markets over the last 10 years but I have come from a background of few qualifications and disengagement with education/ work, I haven’t found it overly challenging to find a job.
Last edited by Cancelled Alice; 2 weeks ago
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ROTL94 2
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#7
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(Original post by Cancelled Alice)
Absolutely.
I’ve seen apprenticeships being offered for roles that could easily be learnt on the job such as cashier type roles or care work in some settings. The minimum wage for apprentices is set a lot lower than the minimum wage for under 18s- it’s a scam.
Quite right, they're basically getting work experience kids to do the work for a significantly reduced rate so they don't have to hire grown adults to do it, who they're legally obligated to pay more.
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dpsng
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#8
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(Original post by Cancelled Alice)
I view the apprenticeship wage as being exploitative in many cases, especially when it’s in a job similar to the ones that I’ve already described. Of course employers take a risk when they recruit, training new staff takes time and money but many employment contracts allow for companies to get rid of employees during their first two years at will. There are other safeguards in place from the employers perspective.

I support apprenticeships that are designed to train people up to do job roles that you would require actual experience for.

I understand that there have been significant changes to the job markets over the last 10 years but I have come from a background of few qualifications and disengagement with education/ work, I haven’t found it overly challenging to find a job.
it depends on the company that u work for. For example in my apprenticeship we get paid similar to grad salaries and increase each year. Also the fact that your qualification is paid for must be taken into consideration. The amount of transferable skills and value they add to you is undoubtedly worth it imo.
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