Biology GCSE experts help

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BrightBlueStar11
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#1
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#1
to clarify what I learned:

is it true that cell division in developing animals (e.g. cub) are mainly focused for both development (e.g. height growth) and to treat wounds. Whereas, cell division in fully developed animals (e.g. adults) are for treating wounds?

anyone plz reply ASAP
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Reality Check
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#2
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
to clarify what I learned:

is it true that cell division in developing animals (e.g. cub) are mainly focused for both development (e.g. height growth) and to treat wounds. Whereas, cell division in fully developed animals (e.g. adults) are for treating wounds?

anyone plz reply ASAP
Not really, no. A fully-developed adult is constantly producing new skin cells, mucosal layers and so forth by mitotic cell division. Mitosis is not restricted to just 'healing wounds' in a fully-developed organism.

Cancer, too, is essentially unregulated mitosis.
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BrightBlueStar11
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Not really, no. A fully-developed adult is constantly producing new skin cells, mucosal layers and so forth by mitotic cell division. Mitosis is not restricted to just 'healing wounds' in a fully-developed organism.

Cancer, too, is essentially unregulated mitosis.
So, cell divisions in adults are mainly focused for replacing cells for wounds and producing new skin cells etc.? Whereas, children have cell division for these reasons as well as for organismal growth?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
So, cell divisions in adults are mainly focused for replacing cells for wounds and producing new skin cells etc.? Whereas, children have cell division for these reasons as well as for organismal growth?
I think it would be better to look at it in terms of organisms grow through mitotic cell division - in addition, a fully developed organism maintains and adapts itself through mitotic cell division - rather than trying to make a clean distinction between a not fully-developed and a fully-developed organism.
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BrightBlueStar11
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I think it would be better to look at it in terms of organisms grow through mitotic cell division - in addition, a fully developed organism maintains and adapts itself through mitotic cell division - rather than trying to make a clean distinction between a not fully-developed and a fully-developed organism.
in terms of interphase stage of the cell cycle. Will cells have 92 chromosomes during interphase stage because they start to replicate its organelles?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
in terms of interphase stage of the cell cycle. Will cells have 92 chromosomes during interphase stage because they start to replicate its organelles?
To answer this question, think about the difference between eukaryotic nuclear DNA and mitochondrial/chloroplast DNA. Which is organised into chromosomes, and which is not? This will answer your question
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BrightBlueStar11
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(Original post by Reality Check)
To answer this question, think about the difference between eukaryotic nuclear DNA and mitochondrial/chloroplast DNA. Which is organised into chromosomes, and which is not? This will answer your question
sorry whats that? im on gcse levels
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Reality Check
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(Original post by BrightBlueStar11)
sorry whats that? im on gcse levels
Oh, sorry - I thought you were doing A levels - I didn't read your thread title carefully enough. Bad RC.

You were talking about organelles replicating, and I thought you were getting confused with the circular DNA found in organelles, and the chromosomal DNA found in the cellular nucleus. That's A level stuff, so you don't need to worry about it at your stage.

Have you heard of the haploid number? A normal somatic (body) cell is diploid (2n) which, in humans, is 46 chromosomes. Just before mitosis, the cell duplicates its cellular DNA, leading to a 4n state, or 92 chromosomes - so you are correct. We don't often talk about this stage, so remember than after mitotic division and division of the cell into two daughter cells the number comes back down to 2n, or 46 chromosomes.

Does that make sense?
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BrightBlueStar11
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#9
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Oh, sorry - I thought you were doing A levels - I didn't read your thread title carefully enough. Bad RC.

You were talking about organelles replicating, and I thought you were getting confused with the circular DNA found in organelles, and the chromosomal DNA found in the cellular nucleus. That's A level stuff, so you don't need to worry about it at your stage.

Have you heard of the haploid number? A normal somatic (body) cell is diploid (2n) which, in humans, is 46 chromosomes. Just before mitosis, the cell duplicates its cellular DNA, leading to a 4n state, or 92 chromosomes - so you are correct. We don't often talk about this stage, so remember than after mitotic division and division of the cell into two daughter cells the number comes back down to 2n, or 46 chromosomes.

Does that make sense?
yes it makes sense now! thank you so much for ur help
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