IrrelevantAsMwah
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#1
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#1
Currently in year 12 and for my A-levels I took chemistry because I want to do forensic science when I go to university but I’m so bad at it, like at GCSE I got a 9 but now I’m getting Es. So another option I have is to do forensic psychology at uni which I think is more achievable since I’m getting Bs in my psychology tests, so I’m wondering whether I should drop chemistry and just focus more on my other three subjects (psychology, law and maths)?
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carxlinefxrbes_
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#2
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#2
Hello! Year 13 chemist here!

(Just want to disclose that I do not know a lot about the requirements for forensics etc..)

Firstly A-Level Chemistry is a really good subject to have as an all-rounder and many universities appreciate the hard work and skills it allows you to gain.

It is normal to see a large change in grades from GCSE to A-Level, it is known to be quite a big jump and can be disheartening. Particularly chemistry. Why? Because chemistry can be really HARD. However, in this same sense, it can also be really rewarding when you finally understand that concept or get that question right, it challenges you because it is meant to be difficult.

Tips I'd recommend.
1) Chemistry is an A-Level where it is pretty much essential that you understand the concepts behind things. Personally, I have to know why something's happening or why something else isn't and when I gain that conventional understanding I can then apply it.
I had a chemistry mock today and some of the topics in it I did not understand AT ALL before Christmas, everyone else in the class would immediately click but I do not learn like that, I have to actively go over it which my other chem teacher kindly did with me and then it began to make sense. As you dive further into chem you also begin to see links between topics which is quite cool.
2) I'd recommend (if you haven't already) getting the CGP A-Level Chemistry Revision guide as it condenses the AQA Chemistry textbook ALOT and in my opinion, is much easier to understand).
3) Youtubers that are good for understanding: Eliot Rintoul, Allery chemistry and MaChemGuy I found pretty useful

Just a couple of other questions:
What have you been getting the E's in, end of topic tests?

How are you revising for these tests?

Why did you choose to take chemistry A-Level? (did you enjoy it or is it because you need it, for me, it was because I wanted to leave my doors open as I was uncertain what I wanted to go into but also because I knew it was renowned and did well in it at GCSE)


What spec is your chemistry?

At the end of the day, it is still always your, personal decision and no one can make the choice for you.
But I'd say if you really very strongly dislike it (and not just because of the grades) maybe psychology is the better option (I don't study it personally so cannot speak on this).

Hope this helps a little?
-carxlinefxrbes_
Last edited by carxlinefxrbes_; 4 months ago
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iqra_xoxoxoxox
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#3
Report 4 months ago
#3
(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
Hello! Year 13 chemist here!

(Just want to disclose that I do not know a lot about the requirements for forensics etc..)

Firstly A-Level Chemistry is a really good subject to have as an all-rounder and many universities appreciate the hard work and skills it allows you to gain.

It is normal to see a large change in grades from GCSE to A-Level, it is known to be quite a big jump and can be disheartening. Particularly chemistry. Why? Because chemistry can be really HARD. However, in this same sense, it can also be really rewarding when you finally understand that concept or get that question right, it challenges you because it is meant to be difficult.

Tips I'd recommend.
1) Chemistry is an A-Level where it is pretty much essential that you understand the concepts behind things. Personally, I have to know why something's happening or why something else isn't and when I gain that conventional understanding I can then apply it.
I had a chemistry mock today and some of the topics in it I did not understand AT ALL before Christmas, everyone else in the class would immediately click but I do not learn like that, I have to actively go over it which my other chem teacher kindly did with me and then it began to make sense. As you dive further into chem you also begin to see links between topics which is quite cool.
2) I'd recommend (if you haven't already) getting the CGP A-Level Chemistry Revision guide as it condenses the AQA Chemistry textbook ALOT and in my opinion, is much easier to understand).
3) Youtubers that are good for understanding: Eliot Rintoul, Allery chemistry and MaChemGuy I found pretty useful

Just a couple of other questions:
What have you been getting the E's in, end of topic tests?

How are you revising for these tests?

Why did you choose to take chemistry A-Level? (did you enjoy it or is it because you need it, for me, it was because I wanted to leave my doors open as I was uncertain what I wanted to go into but also because I knew it was renowned and did well in it at GCSE)


What spec is your chemistry?

At the end of the day, it is still always your, personal decision and no one can make the choice for you.
But I'd say if you really very strongly dislike it (and not just because of the grades) maybe psychology is the better option (I don't study it personally so cannot speak on this).

Hope this helps a little?
-carxlinefxrbes_
This is so informative and I’m going into year 12 next year! I want to do chem bio and psychology
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carxlinefxrbes_
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#4
Report 4 months ago
#4
(Original post by iqra_xoxoxoxox)
This is so informative and I’m going into year 12 next year! I want to do chem bio and psychology
Hiya!

Glad you found it informative
I study biology also!
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McGinger
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#5
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#5
You will need far more than just an undergrad degree in psychology to be qualified as 'a psychologist' - and this area of psychology isnt in the slightest bit 'glamorous'. See https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...c-psychologist
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hannahbbk134
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#6
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#6
just do exam questions lol you’ll notice questions repeat after a while
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Interrobang
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#7
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#7
Forensic psychology and forensic science are very different - so do your research to make sure its the right course. Even if your undergrad course is called forensic psych, it won't qualify you and you'll cover the other areas of psych
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IrrelevantAsMwah
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#8
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#8
(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
Hello! Year 13 chemist here!

(Just want to disclose that I do not know a lot about the requirements for forensics etc..)

Firstly A-Level Chemistry is a really good subject to have as an all-rounder and many universities appreciate the hard work and skills it allows you to gain.

It is normal to see a large change in grades from GCSE to A-Level, it is known to be quite a big jump and can be disheartening. Particularly chemistry. Why? Because chemistry can be really HARD. However, in this same sense, it can also be really rewarding when you finally understand that concept or get that question right, it challenges you because it is meant to be difficult.

Tips I'd recommend.
1) Chemistry is an A-Level where it is pretty much essential that you understand the concepts behind things. Personally, I have to know why something's happening or why something else isn't and when I gain that conventional understanding I can then apply it.
I had a chemistry mock today and some of the topics in it I did not understand AT ALL before Christmas, everyone else in the class would immediately click but I do not learn like that, I have to actively go over it which my other chem teacher kindly did with me and then it began to make sense. As you dive further into chem you also begin to see links between topics which is quite cool.
2) I'd recommend (if you haven't already) getting the CGP A-Level Chemistry Revision guide as it condenses the AQA Chemistry textbook ALOT and in my opinion, is much easier to understand).
3) Youtubers that are good for understanding: Eliot Rintoul, Allery chemistry and MaChemGuy I found pretty useful

Just a couple of other questions:
What have you been getting the E's in, end of topic tests?

How are you revising for these tests?

Why did you choose to take chemistry A-Level? (did you enjoy it or is it because you need it, for me, it was because I wanted to leave my doors open as I was uncertain what I wanted to go into but also because I knew it was renowned and did well in it at GCSE)


What spec is your chemistry?

At the end of the day, it is still always your, personal decision and no one can make the choice for you.
But I'd say if you really very strongly dislike it (and not just because of the grades) maybe psychology is the better option (I don't study it personally so cannot speak on this).

Hope this helps a little?
-carxlinefxrbes_
Hi, yes so I’ve been getting Es in my end-of-topic tests. I’ve been writing my notes condensed onto flashcards to revise which worked pretty well for me in the past but not so much now.
I took chemistry because I need it for forensic science but I also liked learning it at GCSE.
And my exam board is OCR A
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carxlinefxrbes_
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#9
Report 4 months ago
#9
(Original post by IrrelevantAsMwah)
Hi, yes so I’ve been getting Es in my end-of-topic tests. I’ve been writing my notes condensed onto flashcards to revise which worked pretty well for me in the past but not so much now.
I took chemistry because I need it for forensic science but I also liked learning it at GCSE.
And my exam board is OCR A
Hello!

I do not do the exam board OCR A, but I can immediately see a reason why you are not hitting the top grades.

You are not practising exam questions. It really is that simple.

To link in another users post,
(Original post by hannahbbk134)
just do exam questions lol you’ll notice questions repeat after a while
this is what you are missing.

At GCSE chemistry I would say the questions are around 70% (and if not more) written content-based, so writing notes and flashcards works. (it's what I did).
However, when you get to A-Level Chemistry, that shifts completely and it becomes around 75% maths based, mechanisms etc and only around 25% (even that is very incredibly generous as it's probably less) written content-based. So, the same methods you used for learning chemistry at GCSE are NOT going to work anymore.

Here are the steps I take:
1) Watch a video going over the concept and make some notes.
2) EXAM QUESTIONS
3) Mark the exam questions and review why you lost marks. (marking is JUST AS IMPORTANT as doing the questions themselves I believe)
I use this labelling system to see where I lost marks:
M = maths error
A = application (I knew the topic but didn't know how to apply it to this question)
R = read the question
C = communication (I knew the topic but didn't use the right words/language)
K = knowledge
S = statements (maybe it wanted three points but I only put 2)

I then get a flashcard and write MARCKS like an acronym down the side and write how many marks I lost down the side next to each then stable this onto the exam question sheet. Soon you will quickly see where your weak points lie and what you need to do to improve them.

4) If it still is not clicking, see a teacher and ask them to explain the topic to you.

5) Do the SAME QUESTIONS AGAIN and see if you notice an improvement!

Websites that are good for exam questions:
physicsandmathstutor (THE BEST - has notes, flashcards on there too)!
A-Levelchemistry.com
Chemrevise (for notes)
Exampro (if you can access it, your teachers may be able to)

Exam questions are NEEDED for you to get above that E. They are ESSENTIAL and I cannot stress that enough.

Does this make sense?
carxlinefxrbes_
Last edited by carxlinefxrbes_; 4 months ago
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