Bedwetting at University and applying for accommodation

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Anonymous #1
#21
Report 2 weeks ago
#21
(Original post by Callum06)
Thank you! I’ll definitely look into this. I have had kidney issues when I was younger but it didn’t cause bedwetting. I’ll ask if this can be checked somehow.
Yes definitely do that!
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Callum06
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Anonymous)
Yes definitely do that!
Yes. I don’t know why this would suddenly start causing issues though. When I was younger I never had the issue.
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skylark2
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#23
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#23
I don't understand why you keep going on about the sheets. You made a thread about this when you were 14. You had advice on how to avoid getting your sheets and mattress wet, you said you'd tried it, and you said it worked (and of course it worked, it involved buying and using standard commercial products). It is a solved problem. It'll be an even easier solved problem at university since nobody is going to care less what you put in the bins or when you shower.

I get that it's annoying and time-consuming and potentially expensive. I get that you'd much rather it stopped. I don't get the obsession with a nonexistent consequence. If part of the problem is that you can't stop obsessing over getting your sheets and mattress wet even though that's been a solved problem since mid 2020, then tell your doctor that.
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black tea
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#24
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#24
(Original post by skylark2)
I don't understand why you keep going on about the sheets. You made a thread about this when you were 14. You had advice on how to avoid getting your sheets and mattress wet, you said you'd tried it, and you said it worked (and of course it worked, it involved buying and using standard commercial products). It is a solved problem. It'll be an even easier solved problem at university since nobody is going to care less what you put in the bins or when you shower.

I get that it's annoying and time-consuming and potentially expensive. I get that you'd much rather it stopped. I don't get the obsession with a nonexistent consequence. If part of the problem is that you can't stop obsessing over getting your sheets and mattress wet even though that's been a solved problem since mid 2020, then tell your doctor that.
Come on, you must realising university is a completely different kettle of fish and that OP is understandably anxious about it. He will not have the same freedom as most other people if he is having to deal with bed-wetting, and it is wrong to dismiss it as a solved issue as it clearly isn't - it is not exactly normal to be bedwetting in your late teens. OP is already seeing their GP about this and hopefully will find a solution to this, but there is no need to be mean to them in the meantime.
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skylark2
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#25
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#25
Bedwetting isn't a solved issue. I get that.

Keeping his sheets and mattress dry is a solved issue... in a practical sense. If it's still a huge emotional issue then the GP should be aware of that as well as the physical issue. It's entirely possible that it's become part of the cause. But I don't think it's mean to say, "look, you already know how to avoid this particular aspect which is really worrying you, uni won't be any different."
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Callum06
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#26
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#26
(Original post by skylark2)
Bedwetting isn't a solved issue. I get that.

Keeping his sheets and mattress dry is a solved issue... in a practical sense. If it's still a huge emotional issue then the GP should be aware of that as well as the physical issue. It's entirely possible that it's become part of the cause. But I don't think it's mean to say, "look, you already know how to avoid this particular aspect which is really worrying you, uni won't be any different."
I agree that I was given advice before which helps but that’s fine since my family now know about the issue and are supportive. I was just looking for advice about the accommodation at uni because I’m sure it would be different there if they were to find out. I mean I still have over a year to get it sorted but the GP did say that the older you get, the less likely it will stop by itself. You’re right that it could be this stress that is contributing towards the issue but it’s also the other way around. I guess I’ll have to keep up with the prescription for now then at least. Hopefully that will reduce the stress.
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Callum06
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#27
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#27
(Original post by black tea)
Come on, you must realising university is a completely different kettle of fish and that OP is understandably anxious about it. He will not have the same freedom as most other people if he is having to deal with bed-wetting, and it is wrong to dismiss it as a solved issue as it clearly isn't - it is not exactly normal to be bedwetting in your late teens. OP is already seeing their GP about this and hopefully will find a solution to this, but there is no need to be mean to them in the meantime.
Yeah, I’ll be the first person in my family to go to Uni, so I don’t really have anyone that I can ask about this. It’s not normal, I agree that bedwetting at my age is not normal at all, which is why I’m so desperate to stop. At the moment the meds seem like the only way to go. I’ll have to clarify about the drinking issue with the GP but as discussed earlier in the thread, I could stay up later so that I can still take them but then I’ll be losing out on sleep which isn’t exactly ideal either, especially if you are drunk I guess.
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JocastaD
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#28
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#28
I got heavy incontinence at university. Depending on how much you wet, you either should be able to get a en-suite with the staff understanding if you suddenly stain the mattress. Your doctor should treat you or wear pull ups or light adult nappies - depending if you wet a lot.
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Callum06
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#29
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#29
(Original post by JocastaD)
I got heavy incontinence at university. Depending on how much you wet, you either should be able to get a en-suite with the staff understanding if you suddenly stain the mattress. Your doctor should treat you or wear pull ups or light adult nappies - depending if you wet a lot.
Thanks. I definitely think the en-suite is the way to go if possible. Definitely a good idea for a mattress protector. I’ll see what the doctor says.
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Napp
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#30
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#30
As you wont be sharing a room (generally speaking) it shouldnt be too much of an issue, if possibly a bit awkward when someone notices the bed changing/washing
have you tried asking your gp for the medication that helps with bladder incontinence? No idea if itll work but you might get lucky. Suffice it to say, definitely worth getting the doctor to look into what the problem is here
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Callum06
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#31
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#31
(Original post by Napp)
As you wont be sharing a room (generally speaking) it shouldnt be too much of an issue, if possibly a bit awkward when someone notices the bed changing/washing
have you tried asking your gp for the medication that helps with bladder incontinence? No idea if itll work but you might get lucky. Suffice it to say, definitely worth getting the doctor to look into what the problem is here
I have used Desmopressin before.
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JocastaD
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#32
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#32
No one should be teased at uni if you have to wear nappies.
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JocastaD
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#33
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#33
(Original post by JocastaD)
No one should be teased at uni if you have to wear nappies.
Although I experienced it.
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