ZNatalie26
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#1
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#1
I recently chose my A-levels, and it's set that I will be doing those A-levels when I start sixth form. However, recently I've changed my mind about not doing Spanish A-Level, and I really want to do it now, but I can't change my options. So I was thinking- would it be possible to teach myself the A-level from home, using the specification and other online resources? I know it's maybe too ambitious but at the same time I really want to do it. I got a 9 in Spanish for my GCSE mocks, but I know that obviously A-Level is a lot harder, so would it be stupid to try and learn it myself at home? Or should I just try anyway?
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Muttley79
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#2
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(Original post by ZNatalie26)
I recently chose my A-levels, and it's set that I will be doing those A-levels when I start sixth form. However, recently I've changed my mind about not doing Spanish A-Level, and I really want to do it now, but I can't change my options. So I was thinking- would it be possible to teach myself the A-level from home, using the specification and other online resources? I know it's maybe too ambitious but at the same time I really want to do it. I got a 9 in Spanish for my GCSE mocks, but I know that obviously A-Level is a lot harder, so would it be stupid to try and learn it myself at home? Or should I just try anyway?
Are you in Year 11? If so, why can't you change as your place isn't confirmed until August.
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coco:)
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#3
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Is there a particular reason you want to do an A-Level in Spanish? Is it for a requirement or you're just not happy with your choices at the moment? If you're happy with everything you could just learn it on the side but not as an A-Level and if you wanted to you could follow the specification (even if there are probably much better ways to learn a language). If you really wanted to you could say something in your future applications that you continued learning Spanish on the side and that it was a fun challenge? I guess it really comes down to why you want to do a Spanish A-Level.
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ZNatalie26
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Are you in Year 11? If so, why can't you change as your place isn't confirmed until August.
The sixth form I applied to had its application process a few months ago, and all the offers of a place have already been sent out. My offer includes the subjects I originally applied to do, and I don't think it can be changed
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TriplexA
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(Original post by ZNatalie26)
I recently chose my A-levels, and it's set that I will be doing those A-levels when I start sixth form. However, recently I've changed my mind about not doing Spanish A-Level, and I really want to do it now, but I can't change my options. So I was thinking- would it be possible to teach myself the A-level from home, using the specification and other online resources? I know it's maybe too ambitious but at the same time I really want to do it. I got a 9 in Spanish for my GCSE mocks, but I know that obviously A-Level is a lot harder, so would it be stupid to try and learn it myself at home? Or should I just try anyway?
Hi there.

As a former language A level student, I really see it being extremely difficult to do. Self studying for any A level can be very challenging however with languages it's even more so. Firstly, you can't self assess yourself on essays based on either a book or film likewise it'll be incredibly difficult and time consuming to mark any sort of written exercises ( summaries, translations) and ensure you fully understand your grammar mistakes from a mark scheme.

In addition to this the speaking element would also be difficult to self study for as you need to ensure you're pronunciation whilst also ensuring you have enough content and accurate statements.

You could always learn Spanish as a hobby however I know from experience that self studying for a language A level is very challenging.
Best wishes.
Last edited by TriplexA; 1 week ago
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ZNatalie26
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(Original post by coco:))
Is there a particular reason you want to do an A-Level in Spanish? Is it for a requirement or you're just not happy with your choices at the moment? If you're happy with everything you could just learn it on the side but not as an A-Level and if you wanted to you could follow the specification (even if there are probably much better ways to learn a language). If you really wanted to you could say something in your future applications that you continued learning Spanish on the side and that it was a fun challenge? I guess it really comes down to why you want to do a Spanish A-Level.
Well I want to do it because I feel like the subjects I chose at A Level has narrowed down my choices for my future significantly, and also because recently I was told about a career which I'd never thought about before but now I really like the idea of pursuing it, but to do it you need to be proficient in many languages and since I do Spanish GCSE I thought it would be smart to do it as an A-Level.
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ZNatalie26
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(Original post by TriplexA)
Hi there.

As a former language A level student, I really see it being extremely difficult to do. Self studying for any A level can be very challenging however with languages it's even more so. Firstly, you can't self assess yourself on essays based on either a book or film likewise it'll be incredibly difficult and time consuming to mark any sort of written exercises ( summaries, translations) and ensure you fully understand your grammar mistakes from a mark scheme.

In addition to this the speaking element would also be difficult to self study for as you need to ensure you're pronunciation whilst also ensuring you have enough content and accurate statements.

You could always learn Spanish as a hobby however I know from experience that self studying for a language A level is very challenging.
Best wishes.
Ok, thank you!
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ajj2000
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#8
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I think you should ask your prospective college. No guarantees but worth enquiring. What are your other subjects?
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Muttley79
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#9
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#9
(Original post by ZNatalie26)
The sixth form I applied to had its application process a few months ago, and all the offers of a place have already been sent out. My offer includes the subjects I originally applied to do, and I don't think it can be changed
Have you asked? It does happen and I don't think a Spanish class would be full.
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coco:)
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#10
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#10
(Original post by ZNatalie26)
Well I want to do it because I feel like the subjects I chose at A Level has narrowed down my choices for my future significantly, and also because recently I was told about a career which I'd never thought about before but now I really like the idea of pursuing it, but to do it you need to be proficient in many languages and since I do Spanish GCSE I thought it would be smart to do it as an A-Level.
hmmm well if there's no formal requirement for a language A-Level I don't see why you would have to pursue one? In fact, if you continue to learn Spanish to a high standard as a hobby I personally think that would show even more dedication. But ultimately the choice is yours - do what you think would be best to pursue that career. Good luck!!
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TriplexA
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#11
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#11
(Original post by ZNatalie26)
Ok, thank you!
(Original post by ZNatalie26)
Well I want to do it because I feel like the subjects I chose at A Level has narrowed down my choices for my future significantly, and also because recently I was told about a career which I'd never thought about before but now I really like the idea of pursuing it, but to do it you need to be proficient in many languages and since I do Spanish GCSE I thought it would be smart to do it as an A-Level.
I'd recommend getting in touch will you're college and seeing if they can accommodate to your desire to do Spanish. If they don't and you still feel passionate about doing it at A level, perhaps moving to a different college may be a better solution.

Best wishes.
Last edited by TriplexA; 1 week ago
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smallessexgirl
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#12
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#12
(Original post by ZNatalie26)
The sixth form I applied to had its application process a few months ago, and all the offers of a place have already been sent out. My offer includes the subjects I originally applied to do, and I don't think it can be changed
I'm not sure if all sixth forms do this but my sixth form let you rechoose your options on Results Day. It's worth a shot just getting in touch with the sixth form and asking if they do that
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thegeek888
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#13
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#13
(Original post by ZNatalie26)
I recently chose my A-levels, and it's set that I will be doing those A-levels when I start sixth form. However, recently I've changed my mind about not doing Spanish A-Level, and I really want to do it now, but I can't change my options. So I was thinking- would it be possible to teach myself the A-level from home, using the specification and other online resources? I know it's maybe too ambitious but at the same time I really want to do it. I got a 9 in Spanish for my GCSE mocks, but I know that obviously A-Level is a lot harder, so would it be stupid to try and learn it myself at home? Or should I just try anyway?
I am doing A-Level German because I got an A* grade at GCSE and A-Level French because of my Lebanese girlfriends and A-Level Spanish because I want to do business in South America and Spain!!! The new specifications are much more friendly for Private Candidates self teaching.

Don't listen to anybody, because the new specifications for Spanish, French and German with AQA have been made super friendly for Private Candidates!

There is one huge exam, for Listening, Reading and Writing and is worth 50% of your A-Level grade as well as being 2 hours and 30 minutes long.

There is a writing paper exam, consisting of 2 essays of 300 words each on novels or films! ...and it is worth just 20% of your A-Level grade, i.e. each essay is worth 10% of your A-Level grade, so if you liked GCSE English Literature, you will get an A* or A in the essay as it is so similar but it is to be written entirely in Spanish!!!

The speaking exam, is a Individual Research Project and examiner or teacher led stimulus cards where you must speak in Spanish, this is not too difficult if you prepare well! It is worth 30% of the overall A-Level grade too.

Here is a summary of what you will study with AQA exam board for A-LEVEL SPANISH!!!

Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing

What’s assessed:
• Aspects of Hispanic society
• Artistic culture in the Hispanic world
• Multiculturalism in Hispanic society
• Aspects of political life in Hispanic society
• Grammar
How it’s assessed:
• Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
• 100 marks
• 50 % of A-level

Questions
1. Listening and responding to spoken passages from a range of contexts and sources covering different registers and adapted as necessary. Material will include complex factual and abstract content and questions will target main points, gist and detail. Studio recordings will be used and students will have individual control of the recording.
2. All questions are in Spanish, to be answered with non-verbal responses or in Spanish (30 marks).
3. Reading and responding to a variety of texts written for different purposes, drawn from a range of authentic sources and adapted as necessary. Material will include complex factual and abstract content and questions will target main points, gist and detail.
4. All questions are in Spanish, to be answered with non-verbal responses or in Spanish (50 marks).
• Translation into English; a passage of minimum 100 words (10 marks).
• Translation into Spanish; a passage of minimum 100 words (10 marks).
No access to a dictionary during the assessment.

Paper 2: Writing

What’s assessed:
• One text and one film or two texts from the list set in the specification
• Grammar
• How it’s assessed:
• Written exam: 2 hours
• 80 marks in total
• 20 % of A-level

Questions:
1. Either one question in Spanish on a set text from a choice of two questions and one question in Spanish on a set film from a choice of two questions or two questions in Spanish on set texts from a choice of two questions on each text.
2. All questions will require a critical appreciation of the concepts and issues covered in the work and a critical and analytical response to features such as the form and the technique of presentation, as appropriate to the work studied (eg the effect of narrative voice in a prose text or camera work in a film). No access to texts or films during the assessment. No access to a dictionary during the assessment. Students are advised to write approximately 300 words per essay.

Texts

• Federico García Lorca La casa de Bernarda Alba
• Gabriel García Márquez Crónica de una muerte anunciada
• Laura Esquivel Como agua para chocolate
• Ramón J. Sender Réquiem por un campesino español
• Carlos Ruiz Zafón La sombra del viento
• Isabel Allende La casa de los espíritus
• Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer Rimas
• Fernando Fernán-Gómez Las bicicletas son para el verano
• Luis de Castresana El otro árbol de Guernica
• Gabriel García Márquez El coronel no tiene quien le escrib

Paper 3: Speaking

What’s assessed:
1. Individual research project
2. One of four themes ie Aspects of Hispanic society or Artistic culture in the Hispanic world or Multiculturalism in Hispanic society or Aspects of political life in Hispanic society
How it’s assessed:
• Oral exam: 21 – 23 minutes (including 5 minutes preparation time)
• 60 marks in total
• 30% of A-level
Questions:
1. Discussion of a sub-theme with the discussion based on a stimulus card (5 – 6 minutes).
2. The student studies the card for 5 minutes at the start of the test (25 marks).
3. Presentation (2 minutes) and discussion (9 – 10 minutes) of individual research project (35 marks). No access to a dictionary during the assessment (including 5 minutes preparation). Students may take the assessment only once before certification. Assessments will be conducted by either the centre or a visiting examiner and marked by an AQA examiner.
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thegeek888
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#14
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#14
(Original post by smallessexgirl)
I'm not sure if all sixth forms do this but my sixth form let you rechoose your options on Results Day. It's worth a shot just getting in touch with the sixth form and asking if they do that
Yes and French and German are never full, but Spanish is much more popular and might be full?!
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ZNatalie26
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#15
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#15
(Original post by thegeek888)
I am doing A-Level German because I got an A* grade at GCSE and A-Level French because of my Lebanese girlfriends and A-Level Spanish because I want to do business in South America and Spain!!! The new specifications are much more friendly for Private Candidates self teaching.

Don't listen to anybody, because the new specifications for Spanish, French and German with AQA have been made super friendly for Private Candidates!

There is one huge exam, for Listening, Reading and Writing and is worth 50% of your A-Level grade as well as being 2 hours and 30 minutes long.

There is a writing paper exam, consisting of 2 essays of 300 words each on novels or films! ...and it is worth just 20% of your A-Level grade, i.e. each essay is worth 10% of your A-Level grade, so if you liked GCSE English Literature, you will get an A* or A in the essay as it is so similar but it is to be written entirely in Spanish!!!

The speaking exam, is a Individual Research Project and examiner or teacher led stimulus cards where you must speak in Spanish, this is not too difficult if you prepare well! It is worth 30% of the overall A-Level grade too.

Here is a summary of what you will study with AQA exam board for A-LEVEL SPANISH!!!

Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing

What’s assessed:
• Aspects of Hispanic society
• Artistic culture in the Hispanic world
• Multiculturalism in Hispanic society
• Aspects of political life in Hispanic society
• Grammar
How it’s assessed:
• Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
• 100 marks
• 50 % of A-level

Questions
1. Listening and responding to spoken passages from a range of contexts and sources covering different registers and adapted as necessary. Material will include complex factual and abstract content and questions will target main points, gist and detail. Studio recordings will be used and students will have individual control of the recording.
2. All questions are in Spanish, to be answered with non-verbal responses or in Spanish (30 marks).
3. Reading and responding to a variety of texts written for different purposes, drawn from a range of authentic sources and adapted as necessary. Material will include complex factual and abstract content and questions will target main points, gist and detail.
4. All questions are in Spanish, to be answered with non-verbal responses or in Spanish (50 marks).
• Translation into English; a passage of minimum 100 words (10 marks).
• Translation into Spanish; a passage of minimum 100 words (10 marks).
No access to a dictionary during the assessment.

Paper 2: Writing

What’s assessed:
• One text and one film or two texts from the list set in the specification
• Grammar
• How it’s assessed:
• Written exam: 2 hours
• 80 marks in total
• 20 % of A-level

Questions:
1. Either one question in Spanish on a set text from a choice of two questions and one question in Spanish on a set film from a choice of two questions or two questions in Spanish on set texts from a choice of two questions on each text.
2. All questions will require a critical appreciation of the concepts and issues covered in the work and a critical and analytical response to features such as the form and the technique of presentation, as appropriate to the work studied (eg the effect of narrative voice in a prose text or camera work in a film). No access to texts or films during the assessment. No access to a dictionary during the assessment. Students are advised to write approximately 300 words per essay.

Texts

• Federico García Lorca La casa de Bernarda Alba
• Gabriel García Márquez Crónica de una muerte anunciada
• Laura Esquivel Como agua para chocolate
• Ramón J. Sender Réquiem por un campesino español
• Carlos Ruiz Zafón La sombra del viento
• Isabel Allende La casa de los espíritus
• Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer Rimas
• Fernando Fernán-Gómez Las bicicletas son para el verano
• Luis de Castresana El otro árbol de Guernica
• Gabriel García Márquez El coronel no tiene quien le escrib

Paper 3: Speaking

What’s assessed:
1. Individual research project
2. One of four themes ie Aspects of Hispanic society or Artistic culture in the Hispanic world or Multiculturalism in Hispanic society or Aspects of political life in Hispanic society
How it’s assessed:
• Oral exam: 21 – 23 minutes (including 5 minutes preparation time)
• 60 marks in total
• 30% of A-level
Questions:
1. Discussion of a sub-theme with the discussion based on a stimulus card (5 – 6 minutes).
2. The student studies the card for 5 minutes at the start of the test (25 marks).
3. Presentation (2 minutes) and discussion (9 – 10 minutes) of individual research project (35 marks). No access to a dictionary during the assessment (including 5 minutes preparation). Students may take the assessment only once before certification. Assessments will be conducted by either the centre or a visiting examiner and marked by an AQA examiner.
Thank you so much!
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