law or geography?

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lockets
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#1
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#1
hi! im stuck on what uni course i want to take. i would love to do law, but i also have a dream of living abroad when im older and law restricts you to a country. i also dont have a language a level so its hard for me to do a joint degree with another country’s law. i also enjoy geography but not as much, but it lets me travel and is something i know i will like in the future as i do quite enjoy it at a level. is there any jobs with law that i can travel with or unis that dont require a language a level to do a joint law degree? or is geography the best option for me? thanks
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Crazy Jamie
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#2
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From the law perspective, you should bear in mind that there is a difference between studying law at degree level, and doing postgraduate courses with the aim of practising as a lawyer. There are roles (generally as a solicitor, and generally with more prestigious firms) that allow you the option to work in other jurisdictions, but that may not be consistent with your own aim of living abroad. But equally a law degree is only the first step on that path, and in general if you ultimately to look to qualify as a lawyer in another jurisdiction, you're almost certainly going to have to do some sort of additional studying in that jurisdiction anyway. So law may not be as restrictive as you think, albeit it's highly unlikely to be a direct springboard to a job in another country. I'm not sure many degrees necessarily would be, but I don't know.

Broadly, I'd make two points. First, do appreciate the difference between studying an academic subject and obtaining work. I don't know whether Geography gives you a direct route into work abroad, but many roles require some sort of postgraduate study or training after you do your degree. That could actually give you some flexibility to study what you want and then change direction later. Second, you don't have to do this all in one go. You say you want to live abroad at some point. At what point? Could you do a degree, find some work with that abroad for three to five years, and then come back? How about getting into a career here, whether law or something else, and then working towards moving abroad five years or so down the line?

Ultimately, I don't think you need to have everything mapped out right now. There are many, many different routes to working and living abroad, whether that's something you want in your early 20s or later in life. The question is whether that desire to work abroad, and how and when you want to do it, is consistent with studying a law degree now. I think the best approach would be to think in the first instance about what you want, or what you would be happy with, and then researching different jobs that could take you abroad, the requirements to work in different countries, and get an idea of what your route into those roles and living in that or those countries could be. It may be that you can do a law degree now and worry about exactly what you're going to do afterwards at a later time, safe in the knowledge that you'll have some good options either way. But you won't know that until you do more research. So I don't think there's a right answer here. It depends on what you want to do, how and when you want to do it, and whether a law degree can be consistent with that. Broadly I think it's a good thing to study a subject at university that you are interested in. Pursuing your interests is always a good basis for making decisions, and it means you're more likely to obtain better grades. But that obviously has to be consistent with your other ambitions, and to know whether it is you'll have to think on what those are and do some research into ways you can connect the dots.
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lockets
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#3
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#3
(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
From the law perspective, you should bear in mind that there is a difference between studying law at degree level, and doing postgraduate courses with the aim of practising as a lawyer. There are roles (generally as a solicitor, and generally with more prestigious firms) that allow you the option to work in other jurisdictions, but that may not be consistent with your own aim of living abroad. But equally a law degree is only the first step on that path, and in general if you ultimately to look to qualify as a lawyer in another jurisdiction, you're almost certainly going to have to do some sort of additional studying in that jurisdiction anyway. So law may not be as restrictive as you think, albeit it's highly unlikely to be a direct springboard to a job in another country. I'm not sure many degrees necessarily would be, but I don't know.

Broadly, I'd make two points. First, do appreciate the difference between studying an academic subject and obtaining work. I don't know whether Geography gives you a direct route into work abroad, but many roles require some sort of postgraduate study or training after you do your degree. That could actually give you some flexibility to study what you want and then change direction later. Second, you don't have to do this all in one go. You say you want to live abroad at some point. At what point? Could you do a degree, find some work with that abroad for three to five years, and then come back? How about getting into a career here, whether law or something else, and then working towards moving abroad five years or so down the line?

Ultimately, I don't think you need to have everything mapped out right now. There are many, many different routes to working and living abroad, whether that's something you want in your early 20s or later in life. The question is whether that desire to work abroad, and how and when you want to do it, is consistent with studying a law degree now. I think the best approach would be to think in the first instance about what you want, or what you would be happy with, and then researching different jobs that could take you abroad, the requirements to work in different countries, and get an idea of what your route into those roles and living in that or those countries could be. It may be that you can do a law degree now and worry about exactly what you're going to do afterwards at a later time, safe in the knowledge that you'll have some good options either way. But you won't know that until you do more research. So I don't think there's a right answer here. It depends on what you want to do, how and when you want to do it, and whether a law degree can be consistent with that. Broadly I think it's a good thing to study a subject at university that you are interested in. Pursuing your interests is always a good basis for making decisions, and it means you're more likely to obtain better grades. But that obviously has to be consistent with your other ambitions, and to know whether it is you'll have to think on what those are and do some research into ways you can connect the dots.
thank you so much!
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