How do you study for an exam if the professor who is taking this course ....

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Covid-22
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How do you study for an exam if the professor who is taking this course is completely new & recently joined the university? As a result you can't find out his exam formats by looking at his past exams.

People who have faced similar situation how do you revise for you exam? Since time is limited,it is not possible to study everything. How do you figure out what topics & questions have higher possibilities to come in the final exam & what topics to skip only using class lectures as no past exam of the professor is available? Please share your experiences who have gone through this.Thanks in advance.
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MedicWil
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You're making false assumptions there
Most university's exams are made by an entire department in collaboration, not just one lecturer unless it's a tiny university. Your lecturer probably won't have much, if any, input towards the exam
Also you're not there as simply a checkbox exercise to get a piece of paper, you're there to learn the skills you'll need in your future career. You skip something and you'll end up regretting it in your post-university job(s) as you'll fail to have the skills required so revise everything and you'll be good

What course are you doing and how much time do you have for revision?
Last edited by MedicWil; 4 days ago
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hallamstudents
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Hi Covid-22 having a new professor shouldn't make a difference. The module and content being taught would be the same even if an experienced professor at that university was teaching you. You can still find past papers online, and use these to do mock exams on yourself, to see which areas you need to revise more on.

As MedicWil said you shouldn't skip any topics. You came to university to learn, not to just pass a module. Usually things you learn in one year you will need to use in the next year, so if you completely skip over parts this year it will be worse for you in the long run. Yes time may be limited, but it is better to have good overall knowledge than it is to have excellent knowledge on one or two parts.

You should go over all learning for that module, unless in lectures the professor gave hints about what might be on the paper there is absolutely no way of knowing what will come up in the exam. You should make a revision timetable for yourself, where it is planned what you will study each day, and make it so that you will end up having studied everything on that module before it is time to take your exam. If time is really limited and you won't have time for this, then I would revise parts you do not know much about in order to give you a better chance of being able to answer every question.

There are different ways to revise, some examples are: past papers, and after you do the past paper use the marking scheme provided with it to see what the perfect answers were and revise the ones you got wrong or could have answered better; make your own or buy revision cards for that subject and use these to test yourself and absorb the knowledge, as some people do better with smaller bits of information at a time + the repetitiveness can help it stick; you could re-watch the online lectures, make questions for yourself based on what was taught in a lecture, as these could then be questions that come up in an exam, and try write a perfect answer for them and memorise it; go through your notes of the lectures and revise these; or form a study group and come up with ways to test each other.

It can be stressful revising for exams, make sure to take plenty of breaks in between working. t's better to do five one-hour stints with breaks than to revise solidly for seven or eight hours, you are more likely to retain the information this way. If you start to lose focus, take a break and do something completely different. https://www.thecompleteuniversitygui...exams-top-tips

Best of luck in your exam.

- Rosie
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