Do you have a long term condition requiring medication?

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Anonymous #1
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People seem surprised if you are under 40 and tell them you have a long term health condition, just wondered how common it is
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Scietist
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(Original post by Anonymous)
People seem surprised if you are under 40 and tell them you have a long term health condition, just wondered how common it is
Only 14% of people under 40 have a long term medical condition, compared to 58% of people over 60.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Anonymous)
People seem surprised if you are under 40 and tell them you have a long term health condition, just wondered how common it is
A lot of young people have asthma and regularly use inhalers, so I don't think it should be that surprising.
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Anonymous #2
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I would say more common than you think, many of my friends have different health conditions which require medication its probably more likely that the younger generation are less likely to see someone over it, i've never once had someone surprised over it. Among my friends I know people that take medication for things like Anxiety, IBS, ADHD or Asthma among other things. Even in a different country some of my roommates take medication for a heart condition (age 18), one of my roommates back home last year had a heart attack over lockdown 1 and was in treatment for that he was 23!

It really isn't that uncommon
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Anonymous #3
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My son is on long term medication for a mental health condition (OCD). Many under 40s are on medication for things like:

Adhd, asthma, diabetes, kidney problems etc all of these will be long term so it’s really not strange at all though of course you would expect a higher number on long term medication in the older age groups, but it’s certainly not strange. I’d say the people who seemed surprised when you mentioned it are just lacking in awareness.
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Honey57
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Yep, OCD. NHS made me do CBT which made me worse which shows how inexperienced and unprofessional the mental health side of the nhs is. Hence why I went to private care and met a doctor that actually knows what she’s saying and prescribed me meds which have done wonders.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Honey57)
Yep, OCD. NHS made me do CBT which made me worse which shows how inexperienced and unprofessional the mental health side of the nhs is. Hence why I went to private care and met a doctor that actually knows what she’s saying and prescribed me meds which have done wonders.
I appreciate you had a bad experience of the NHS, but it's a bit sweeping to say that the whole institution is 'inexperienced and unprofessional'.

You know that your 'private doctor' probably also does NHS work as well?
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Honey57
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I appreciate you had a bad experience of the NHS, but it's a bit sweeping to say that the whole institution is 'inexperienced and unprofessional'.

You know that your 'private doctor' probably also does NHS work as well?
No she doesn’t, she’s living abroad and she ain’t British because I suffered so much with crap therapists and a terrible psychiatrist. NHS surgeries are amazing, really beyond their time. That and their cancer treatment too. Also I didn’t mean the whole institution. I really do support them in that sense but diagnosing in NHS is absolutely awful along with the mental health side of things. If you tell your doctor I’m about to kill my self they just say ‘call Samaritans’. I understand it’s underfunded but they could’ve just told me they don’t know what to do or don’t have any experience so that I could’ve gone private 6 years ago and would’ve actually got help.

Ps
Also, I’m aware that there are ‘good’ doctors in the nhs. There’s just a small population of them and this is where the main problem arises, it’s hard and costly to be referred to a good doctor with lots of experience. For example, I should’ve been seen by a therapist that has a had minimum of 10 years of experience with dealing with ocd and their subtypes and who works alongside a very experienced psychiatrist. Instead I was told I could only have 2 months of cbt with a therapist that recently finished uni and had barely any experience and she didn’t think of referring me to a psychiatrist either to get me diagnosed. But hey, everyone has a different experience.
Last edited by Honey57; 3 days ago
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gjd800
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I have three.
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Jaciruyi8
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(Original post by gjd800)
I have three.
I have three as well
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Jess_Lomas
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(Original post by Honey57)
No she doesn’t, she’s living abroad and she ain’t British because I suffered so much with crap therapists and a terrible psychiatrist. NHS surgeries are amazing, really beyond their time. That and their cancer treatment too. Also I didn’t mean the whole institution. I really do support them in that sense but diagnosing in NHS is absolutely awful along with the mental health side of things. If you tell your doctor I’m about to kill my self they just say ‘call Samaritans’. I understand it’s underfunded but they could’ve just told me they don’t know what to do or don’t have any experience so that I could’ve gone private 6 years ago and would’ve actually got help.

Ps
Also, I’m aware that there are ‘good’ doctors in the nhs. There’s just a small population of them and this is where the main problem arises, it’s hard and costly to be referred to a good doctor with lots of experience. For example, I should’ve been seen by a therapist that has a had minimum of 10 years of experience with dealing with ocd and their subtypes and who works alongside a very experienced psychiatrist. Instead I was told I could only have 2 months of cbt with a therapist that recently finished uni and had barely any experience and she didn’t think of referring me to a psychiatrist either to get me diagnosed. But hey, everyone has a different experience.
I totally understand you and the NHS is doing an amazing job with the limited supply but when it comes to mental health they need lots more funding as they give everyone the same thing no matter their circumstances but they do do an amazing job almost all the time and always try their hardest
For me I have ASD and they that CBT doesn't work with anxiety for people who are neurodiverse and I tried it once as I thought it would be worth it and it wa the only thing they were offering but I got referred again pretty much a couple of months after this time with a letter from school and the doctor explaining how it doesn't work with ASD so I had the initial phone call and was honest (normally I just say no even if its true) and then they still only offered CBT and honesty I've felt like it has made my ability to talk to someone even more
Last edited by Jess_Lomas; 3 days ago
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PinkMobilePhone
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I'm 38, and no I don't.

I wouldn't say it's necessarily uncommon for under 40s to have a long term condition, but statistically I would think that more people don't.
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Pathway
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Yes, I have quite a lot because of how many conditions I have. It is what it is.
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black tea
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Yes. Tried for a long time to avoid being on meds but my quality of life is a lot better when I'm on them so I don't mess around trying to stop them any more.
Last edited by black tea; 3 days ago
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Emma:-)
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I dont personally.
But i have known of people who are on long term medication for stuff.
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