English language GCSE- Creative writing section

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Island1023
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First question- In the English language paper section B writing, is it easier to write a description of a picture or to write a story?

Second question- How could you structure a descriptive piece of writing/ a story to achieve a Grade 8/9?
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Scietist
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(Original post by Island1023)
First question- In the English language paper section B writing, is it easier to write a description of a picture or to write a story?

Second question- How could you structure a descriptive piece of writing/ a story to achieve a Grade 8/9?
I can’t say, which one is easier, because it based on the individual, but in my opinion the second option - creative writing is better. This would be because you can plan and write your story before the exam, so you are highly prepared and get the maximum result.

There isn’t an official structure on the formation of your story, so your are able to use as many different techniques as you want.

Try to use the language terminology and structure points, for example: metaphors, similes, hypophora, sibilance, ellipsis etc. You can search up top level answers from past papers and read around 10 and then start forming your own one. Then you could just post it and ask what grade it deserves
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LightHades
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(Original post by Island1023)
First question- In the English language paper section B writing, is it easier to write a description of a picture or to write a story?

Second question- How could you structure a descriptive piece of writing/ a story to achieve a Grade 8/9?
Answer 1: Well both have their perks, but that being said, both are really similar. A narrative is just a descriptive piece with an essence of story! At the end of the day, it's based on you and the question. There is no set rules for determining which is easier. However, in the exam, if you're struggling to choose, choose the one you, at that point in time, find easiest/have most ideas about.

Answer 2: At the end of the day, there are no set best structures and it is all your decision. However, there are definitely some structures we were taught which set you up for the higher grades. For example, Calm-Chaos-Calm. It's as it says on the tin, a calm moment, followed by some disruption and a return to the calmness. Be careful with this one. It's unadvisable to have your "chaos" bit to be something extremely dramatic like an explosion. The best pieces tend to have more subtle "chaos". Such as a boy on a beach all alone then hearing footsteps; but they turn out to be a seagull's. I'm not saying that's the best example, but it's certainly better than having an entire city nuked! You get my point. Another structure is two people from different backgrounds meeting. Again, pretty self-explanatory. E.g. a poor person and a rich person interacting. Again, the interaction can be subtle - they bump into each other and exchange dirty glances. Another, is a flash-back/flash-forward to compare two different times. I'd suggest not going too far backwards or forwards and having something which links the present and the flashback/flashforward: e.g. the main character sees a pigeon and thinks back to when he was younger (again, not the best example). These are just a recommended structures, but the most important thing is the conveying of an abstract notion. The best answers will consider macro issues such as the passage of time or damage to the environment. This has to be done subtly, so don't just say "Johnathon disliked the massive factories" - but perhaps, "the towering giants spit out their noxious poisoning: choking the sky". Convey this abstraction throughout your entire piece, subtly through the use of language devices. This abstraction is absolutely crucial in allowing you to hit those higher bands, as it shows the more perceptive thinking behind your writing. One structural technique I really like to use is a cyclical structure - link the end to the beginning, it shows the examiner you've thought carefully of your piece as a whole. Again, this can and should be done subtly.

A few tips on the description, remember you are expected to create a description inspired by the prompt. If it's an image of an old man, don't describe the image itself! Remember, you can change the people, the time, the weather and many more things about the image. As long as the base idea is followed, it's all good.

I hope this was helpful, I would be happy to answer any further questions!
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