Thoughts/advice on my a-level politics essay (first year)

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candle_shyy
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#1
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#1
I’m aware this isn’t a great essay, but it would be really appreciated to have some thoughts on it )

Evaluate the view that the Labour Party has returned to its traditional ideas and policies:

The Tony Blair era saw a new type of Labour party emerge, one that took over a country recovering from firm right wing Conservative rule. This new Labour party is seen as more centrist. After Blair and Brown, Labour has seen a series of leaders take over, with a mix of policies from old Labour to new Labour. In defence of the statement this essay will outline why the Labour party has returned to its traditional, old Labour ideas and policies.

It could be argued that in terms of economic policy labour has maintained its new labour viewpoints since the Blair era. When Miliband was the leader from 20_-20_, he promised not to tax the rich too much, in a Blair esque attempt to appeal to everyone. Labour are traditionally for the poor, so well off voters are often more inclined to vote Conservative, as their policies usually involve taxing the rich less, so they could keep their money. Under Blair, it was just after the Thatcher era, and so appealing to people in the centre was important, even if it meant taxing the rich less. Miliband continued this new Labour technique. However he also was in favour of an austerity-lite compromise, not willing to eradicate austerity totally, but just toning it down a little. This is also a very new Labour approach and contrasts massively by the later old labour approaches of Corbyn. Although these 2 key policies are new Labour in their economic approach, many recent Labour policies have been more old Labour. Even though he pledged to not tax the rich too heavily, Miliband also promised to not cut benefits, as part of his goal to appeal to everyone. Labour is very pro welfare state, and even though they continued to value the welfare state under Blair, the new Labour era did bring some cuts to benefits. This is the opposite to what Miliband was to pledging. He also promised to raise the minimum wage to over £8, and make an investment in the British banks. This is more old Labour style as it demonstrates the traditional desire for the state to intervene and lend a hand to the economy and public services rather than just let it be. Corbyn’s economic policies were all entirely old Labour ideas, as he is regarded as the most traditional Labour leader for years. He wanted to renationalise almost everything, as does Starmer, from Royal Mail to energy and gas. Old Labour believes in state owenership, whereas new Labour, although not completely against nationalising the industries, was also content with privatisation. Both Corbyn and Starmer have pledged to tax the rich more, very strongly old labour policies, and Corbyn wanted to use this extra money to make university tuition free. Labour is committed to the needs of the public, especially those less fortunate, policies that enable the poorer communities to have more access to things such as the education system, they alleviate some of the poverty. Both Starmer and Corbyn were also in favour of being hard on tax fraud. Tax fraud goes right against the poorer members of society, who struggle to survive whilst having to pay taxes too. If Labour want to tax the rich more in order to help release some of the pressures of living costs on the working class, tax fraud simply puts a stop to this, as rich business and people get away with paying less or no taxes at all.

Overall the Labour party has more old Labour orientated economic policies, a stronger desire to tax the rich and prevent any tax fraud, offering help to the poorer members of society through free tuition fees and no cuts to benefits. And crucially, the intention to renationalise key industries.

On the one hand, it could appear that Labour’s recent foreign policy has been more new Labour style. One of Ed Miliband’s foreign policies was to reform the EU so it ‘works with Britain’. Working with the EU, and playing an active role within it is typically a more new Labour move. Blair was very fond of the EU and having strong ties with Europe. This is also reflected in Starmer’s desire to ‘rebuild bridges’ with important allies, European countries. Miliband also wanted the UK to possess a ‘strong and confident place on the world stage’. These nationalistic desires fit new Labour ideology much better than old Labour, which is traditionally not too focused on the UK’s position internationally. However recent Labour policies have shown old Labour traits as well, such as Starmer’s policy of ‘clamping down on good produced through forced labour in China’, yet again demonstrating an old Labour passion to help those in need, and often those who are subjected to forced labour are poverty stricken, working class people. Yet again Corbyn is on the whole old Labour in his foreign policy, a Eurosceptic, the reason he was pro remaining in the EU was for the workers rights the EU enforces. These include the basics like rights to health and safety in the work place, equal treatment, parental leave etc, many of them welfare state driven, which is appealing to traditional Labour values. He also supported abolishing the monarchy, an old imperialist institution that values tradition. The monarchy appeals more to the Conservatives or even centrists (which new Labour is much closer to), it’s seen as out of date, and the elitist factor involving how rich the royals are goes against old Labour values.

It is evident therefore that Labour is much more overwhelmingly old Labour ik foreign policy, supporting the rights of workers and those less fortunate, as well as ridding of ancient, empire driven institutions like the monarchy which serves no purpose anymore.

Some would argue that in terms of welfare policies, the current Labour party is stuck with new Labour ideology about the welfare state. Ed Miliband promised compulsory work programmes for people who can work but didn’t for 12 months. This is seen to be a more new Labour style of operating, as it ensures people have to work to some degree and almost forces them to get back on to their feet, in a firmer approach than how old Labour would operate. Starmer takes a similar approach with compulsory work experience for children, allowing them to experience the working world before they’re even there yet. However these aren’t as significant as the extent of old Labour welfare policy, such as Miliband’s pledge to build more houses, at least 200000 by 2020. Jeremy Corbyn in particular was very pro welfare state, pledging increases to pensions and food bank usage, equal righrs in the workplace, free personal healthcare for the elderly. All of these are very evidently old Labour ideas. They promote support for those who need it, by providing food banks and free personal healthcare, it helps alleviate some of the struggles the poor and working class face. All these ideas are focuses around the traditional values of helping those in need in any way possible. He also promoted welfare reform. Reform is both an old and new Labour action, as Blair did a lot of reforms himself, so it is yet again just proving that Corbyn’s ideas remained left wing. Starmer also wants to introduce similar things such as scrapping provision of disability assessments and work capability assessments, making the work place more equal and accessible.

Ok the whole it is clear that Labour maintains its traditional values, supporting poor communities, backing workers, creating a more equal and fair society, in which the government provides the support, rather than new Labour policies which, although are pro welfare state, included some cuts to benefits.

In conclusion, Labour had returned to its traditional values. Under Jeremy Corbyn particularly was the biggest impact on the recent years of the Labour party, a strong old labour politician, his policies of renationalisation, advocating for the welfare state and workers, make it impossible to deny Labour has moved away from new Labour ideas. Whilst Miliband may have presented as being more new Labour (although considering he was leader straight out of the Blair and Brown years, this isn’t surprising), even he admits that he is more left wing and should’ve presented more left wing policies. Starmer could qualify as either, but this essay has outlined why even he is more old Labour in his values.
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narabarrrr
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#2
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#2
(Original post by candle_shyy)
I’m aware this isn’t a great essay, but it would be really appreciated to have some thoughts on it )

Evaluate the view that the Labour Party has returned to its traditional ideas and policies:

The Tony Blair era saw a new type of Labour party emerge, one that took over a country recovering from firm right wing Conservative rule. This new Labour party is seen as more centrist. After Blair and Brown, Labour has seen a series of leaders take over, with a mix of policies from old Labour to new Labour. In defence of the statement this essay will outline why the Labour party has returned to its traditional, old Labour ideas and policies.

It could be argued that in terms of economic policy labour has maintained its new labour viewpoints since the Blair era. When Miliband was the leader from 20_-20_, he promised not to tax the rich too much, in a Blair esque attempt to appeal to everyone. Labour are traditionally for the poor, so well off voters are often more inclined to vote Conservative, as their policies usually involve taxing the rich less, so they could keep their money. Under Blair, it was just after the Thatcher era, and so appealing to people in the centre was important, even if it meant taxing the rich less. Miliband continued this new Labour technique. However he also was in favour of an austerity-lite compromise, not willing to eradicate austerity totally, but just toning it down a little. This is also a very new Labour approach and contrasts massively by the later old labour approaches of Corbyn. Although these 2 key policies are new Labour in their economic approach, many recent Labour policies have been more old Labour. Even though he pledged to not tax the rich too heavily, Miliband also promised to not cut benefits, as part of his goal to appeal to everyone. Labour is very pro welfare state, and even though they continued to value the welfare state under Blair, the new Labour era did bring some cuts to benefits. This is the opposite to what Miliband was to pledging. He also promised to raise the minimum wage to over £8, and make an investment in the British banks. This is more old Labour style as it demonstrates the traditional desire for the state to intervene and lend a hand to the economy and public services rather than just let it be. Corbyn’s economic policies were all entirely old Labour ideas, as he is regarded as the most traditional Labour leader for years. He wanted to renationalise almost everything, as does Starmer, from Royal Mail to energy and gas. Old Labour believes in state owenership, whereas new Labour, although not completely against nationalising the industries, was also content with privatisation. Both Corbyn and Starmer have pledged to tax the rich more, very strongly old labour policies, and Corbyn wanted to use this extra money to make university tuition free. Labour is committed to the needs of the public, especially those less fortunate, policies that enable the poorer communities to have more access to things such as the education system, they alleviate some of the poverty. Both Starmer and Corbyn were also in favour of being hard on tax fraud. Tax fraud goes right against the poorer members of society, who struggle to survive whilst having to pay taxes too. If Labour want to tax the rich more in order to help release some of the pressures of living costs on the working class, tax fraud simply puts a stop to this, as rich business and people get away with paying less or no taxes at all.

Overall the Labour party has more old Labour orientated economic policies, a stronger desire to tax the rich and prevent any tax fraud, offering help to the poorer members of society through free tuition fees and no cuts to benefits. And crucially, the intention to renationalise key industries.

On the one hand, it could appear that Labour’s recent foreign policy has been more new Labour style. One of Ed Miliband’s foreign policies was to reform the EU so it ‘works with Britain’. Working with the EU, and playing an active role within it is typically a more new Labour move. Blair was very fond of the EU and having strong ties with Europe. This is also reflected in Starmer’s desire to ‘rebuild bridges’ with important allies, European countries. Miliband also wanted the UK to possess a ‘strong and confident place on the world stage’. These nationalistic desires fit new Labour ideology much better than old Labour, which is traditionally not too focused on the UK’s position internationally. However recent Labour policies have shown old Labour traits as well, such as Starmer’s policy of ‘clamping down on good produced through forced labour in China’, yet again demonstrating an old Labour passion to help those in need, and often those who are subjected to forced labour are poverty stricken, working class people. Yet again Corbyn is on the whole old Labour in his foreign policy, a Eurosceptic, the reason he was pro remaining in the EU was for the workers rights the EU enforces. These include the basics like rights to health and safety in the work place, equal treatment, parental leave etc, many of them welfare state driven, which is appealing to traditional Labour values. He also supported abolishing the monarchy, an old imperialist institution that values tradition. The monarchy appeals more to the Conservatives or even centrists (which new Labour is much closer to), it’s seen as out of date, and the elitist factor involving how rich the royals are goes against old Labour values.

It is evident therefore that Labour is much more overwhelmingly old Labour ik foreign policy, supporting the rights of workers and those less fortunate, as well as ridding of ancient, empire driven institutions like the monarchy which serves no purpose anymore.

Some would argue that in terms of welfare policies, the current Labour party is stuck with new Labour ideology about the welfare state. Ed Miliband promised compulsory work programmes for people who can work but didn’t for 12 months. This is seen to be a more new Labour style of operating, as it ensures people have to work to some degree and almost forces them to get back on to their feet, in a firmer approach than how old Labour would operate. Starmer takes a similar approach with compulsory work experience for children, allowing them to experience the working world before they’re even there yet. However these aren’t as significant as the extent of old Labour welfare policy, such as Miliband’s pledge to build more houses, at least 200000 by 2020. Jeremy Corbyn in particular was very pro welfare state, pledging increases to pensions and food bank usage, equal righrs in the workplace, free personal healthcare for the elderly. All of these are very evidently old Labour ideas. They promote support for those who need it, by providing food banks and free personal healthcare, it helps alleviate some of the struggles the poor and working class face. All these ideas are focuses around the traditional values of helping those in need in any way possible. He also promoted welfare reform. Reform is both an old and new Labour action, as Blair did a lot of reforms himself, so it is yet again just proving that Corbyn’s ideas remained left wing. Starmer also wants to introduce similar things such as scrapping provision of disability assessments and work capability assessments, making the work place more equal and accessible.

Ok the whole it is clear that Labour maintains its traditional values, supporting poor communities, backing workers, creating a more equal and fair society, in which the government provides the support, rather than new Labour policies which, although are pro welfare state, included some cuts to benefits.

In conclusion, Labour had returned to its traditional values. Under Jeremy Corbyn particularly was the biggest impact on the recent years of the Labour party, a strong old labour politician, his policies of renationalisation, advocating for the welfare state and workers, make it impossible to deny Labour has moved away from new Labour ideas. Whilst Miliband may have presented as being more new Labour (although considering he was leader straight out of the Blair and Brown years, this isn’t surprising), even he admits that he is more left wing and should’ve presented more left wing policies. Starmer could qualify as either, but this essay has outlined why even he is more old Labour in his values.
What exam board do you do? Because the assessment objectives and levels for the exam board is how you’d grade an essay
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