Living at halls or home?

Watch this thread
Gululululu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#1
I was wondering if anyone has any advice on how to decide whether to stay at home or move to student halls while at uni

Both Universities I'm applying to are about 1 hour away from home with public transport which isn't too bad but it would be annoying to have that journey potentially every day.

I want to live in halls as I want to know what it's like to live by my ow, it would be a better environment to study in and apparently its easier to make friends that way, which is good for me as I really struggle with socializing.
But then again there's also a big chance that I will hate it and that I'll be scared of everyone living there and I don't really want to spend a year being more anxious than I already am but there's no way of knowing what will happen which makes it difficult
And what also worries me is that I won't be able to move back home if i decide to leave- at least not to my room
And where will i store all of my things if i leave?

Sorry that its quite a lot to read but i hope someone has some advice
0
reply
LittleBear04
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 3 months ago
#2
It's normal to feel anxious about moving to halls - everyone feels the same, nobody truly feels that 'relaxed' it's a big change. Moving to halls will mean you get to meet new friends, alongside avoid a long commute. A 60 minute commute would be frustrating and possibly quite tiring if you combine that with early rises and other commitments.
3
reply
Anisa-CityUoL
Badges: 7
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 3 months ago
#3
Hi Gululululu

I hope you are doing well.

I commute to university and it takes me about 40 minutes. I enjoy commuting as I find it relaxing and a time to spend for myself. It seems like you want to stay at halls and that is perfectly fine. If this is something you really wish to do then do so. It's totally normal to feel anxious about living at halls but remember that everyone is in the same boat as you. But, even if you decide not to live at halls, you still are able to make friends.

I hope this helps.

Anisa 😊
Final Year Law Student
0
reply
Uni of Southampton Students
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 3 months ago
#4
(Original post by Gululululu)
I was wondering if anyone has any advice on how to decide whether to stay at home or move to student halls while at uni

Both Universities I'm applying to are about 1 hour away from home with public transport which isn't too bad but it would be annoying to have that journey potentially every day.

I want to live in halls as I want to know what it's like to live by my ow, it would be a better environment to study in and apparently its easier to make friends that way, which is good for me as I really struggle with socializing.
But then again there's also a big chance that I will hate it and that I'll be scared of everyone living there and I don't really want to spend a year being more anxious than I already am but there's no way of knowing what will happen which makes it difficult
And what also worries me is that I won't be able to move back home if i decide to leave- at least not to my room
And where will i store all of my things if i leave?

Sorry that its quite a lot to read but i hope someone has some advice
Hi Gululululu

Don't worry, it is completely normally to feel a bit nervous about leaving home for the first time.

It may be worth checking whether the universities you are applying to allow you to put forward any preferences of who you live with in halls, for example non-drinking, single sex etc. Try having a look at the university accommodation site if this may be something of interest.

I would agree that being in halls does mean that you are more readily available to get involved with things such as freshers events and travelling to and from your accommodation becomes less of a worry. It is important to remember that everyone will be new to each other in your flat and will all be getting to know each for the first time, so it is a great way to make some initial friends with people that aren't necessarily on your course.

I was in halls for my first year and I am so glad I took the plunge and moved away from home.However, I completely understand that this change is not for everyone. As Anisa has already mentioned, no matter where you decide to live when attending university, you will be able to make friends and socialise. Halls just means you are a little closer to the action and studying in a flat with other students.

If you decide to move in to halls and find that you are struggling, be sure to contact the Well-being team for the university you attend and I am sure they will be able to offer some friendly advice and guidance.

Which universities were you thinking of applying to?

Jasmine (an Official University of Southampton Rep)
Last edited by Uni of Southampton Students; 3 months ago
1
reply
Gululululu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#5
(Original post by Anisa-CityUoL)
Hi Gululululu

I hope you are doing well.

I commute to university and it takes me about 40 minutes. I enjoy commuting as I find it relaxing and a time to spend for myself. It seems like you want to stay at halls and that is perfectly fine. If this is something you really wish to do then do so. It's totally normal to feel anxious about living at halls but remember that everyone is in the same boat as you. But, even if you decide not to live at halls, you still are able to make friends.

I hope this helps.

Anisa 😊
Final Year Law Student
Thanks for your reply!

I also quite enjoy long journeys! just not having to wake up early as it takes me very long to get ready
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 3 months ago
#6
A 1 hour commute becomes very taxing over time - I know it doesn't sound like much but trust me, as someone who had roughly that commute before, by the end of the year the process can feel exhausting (especially if you have multiple changes)!

I would recommend trying out halls in first year. (Almost) everyone will be in the same boat of moving out for the first time and living independently with unfamiliar people, which can help make it a bit more manageable (commiseration tends to bring people together ). It's also probably the best time to "test it out" with relatively little chance it will affect other things too badly, since your marks in first year of uni normally do not count towards your final classification (or count only a tiny amount), you aren't having to settle into a new job or something at the same time, and as noted most everyone else is in the same situation. If you wait until 2nd year, 3rd year, after graduating etc, you have a lot more variables that could be affected by difficulties in adjusting to living independently.

Also if you don't like it you can always move back home for second year and onwards - since most students in second year and onwards live outside of halls then that's a valid option if it's cheaper and more practical for you anyway (plus you likely will have made connections with people by then so won't be "missing out" socially so much).
2
reply
Gululululu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#7
(Original post by Uni of Southampton Students)
Hi Gululululu

Don't worry, it is completely normally to feel a bit nervous about leaving home for the first time.

It may be worth checking whether the universities you are applying to allow you to put forward any preferences of who you live with in halls, for example non-drinking, single sex etc. Try having a look at the university accommodation site if this may be something of interest.

I would agree that being in halls does mean that you are more readily available to get involved with things such as freshers events and travelling to and from your accommodation becomes less of a worry. It is important to remember that everyone will be new to each other in your flat and will all be getting to know each for the first time, so it is a great way to make some initial friends with people that aren't necessarily on your course.

I was in halls for my first year and I am so glad I took the plunge and moved away from home.However, I completely understand that this change is not for everyone. As Anisa has already mentioned, no matter where you decide to live when attending university, you will be able to make friends and socialise. Halls just means you are a little closer to the action and studying in a flat with other students.

If you decide to move in to halls and find that you are struggling, be sure to contact the Well-being team for the university you attend and I am sure they will be able to offer some friendly advice and guidance.

Which universities were you thinking of applying to?

Jasmine (an Official University of Southampton Rep)
I've applied to Arts University Bournemouth and Solent University, but if I do move into student accommodation it will have to be privately as the halls AUB offer are too expensive and the Solent ones seem horrible

I think moving into halls for the first year is a good idea, but would it be a waste of money if i stayed at home during weekends and holidays?
0
reply
LittleBear04
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 3 months ago
#8
(Original post by Gululululu)
I've applied to Arts University Bournemouth and Solent University, but if I do move into student accommodation it will have to be privately as the halls AUB offer are too expensive and the Solent ones seem horrible

I think moving into halls for the first year is a good idea, but would it be a waste of money if i stayed at home during weekends and holidays?
Most students go back home during holidays particularly festives at least for a period. You could get a part-time job at weekends if you wished, just be careful not to do 'too much'.
0
reply
Gululululu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#9
(Original post by artful_lounger)
A 1 hour commute becomes very taxing over time - I know it doesn't sound like much but trust me, as someone who had roughly that commute before, by the end of the year the process can feel exhausting (especially if you have multiple changes)!

I would recommend trying out halls in first year. (Almost) everyone will be in the same boat of moving out for the first time and living independently with unfamiliar people, which can help make it a bit more manageable (commiseration tends to bring people together ). It's also probably the best time to "test it out" with relatively little chance it will affect other things too badly, since your marks in first year of uni normally do not count towards your final classification (or count only a tiny amount), you aren't having to settle into a new job or something at the same time, and as noted most everyone else is in the same situation. If you wait until 2nd year, 3rd year, after graduating etc, you have a lot more variables that could be affected by difficulties in adjusting to living independently.

Also if you don't like it you can always move back home for second year and onwards - since most students in second year and onwards live outside of halls then that's a valid option if it's cheaper and more practical for you anyway (plus you likely will have made connections with people by then so won't be "missing out" socially so much).
I didn't realise that the first year isnt that important, but that makes the idea of not being at home that year a bit less scary, thank you!
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report 3 months ago
#10
(Original post by Gululululu)
I didn't realise that the first year isnt that important, but that makes the idea of not being at home that year a bit less scary, thank you!
I mean it is important in a sense, as it is foundational, but the results don't count (or count for much) so there is potentially less pressure to perform well in assessments/exams and you can focus more on adapting to the different style of learning at uni and understanding the material rather than learning to the exam as much per se. This also gives you some extra mental/emotional bandwidth for your personal development as you adjust to independent living.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 3 months ago
0
reply
Gululululu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#11
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I mean it is important in a sense, as it is foundational, but the results don't count (or count for much) so there is potentially less pressure to perform well in assessments/exams and you can focus more on adapting to the different style of learning at uni and understanding the material rather than learning to the exam as much per se. This also gives you some extra mental/emotional bandwidth for your personal development as you adjust to independent living.
That makes sense
What about when it's a practical subject? I have applied to Costume and Fashion courses which are mostly coursework based or does the same apply
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#12
Report 3 months ago
#12
(Original post by Gululululu)
That makes sense
What about when it's a practical subject? I have applied to Costume and Fashion courses which are mostly coursework based or does the same apply
Hmm, in that case things might be different...I imagine things might count less towards your overall classification but they might count for something. Best check the programme regulations/specification (usually available online from the department, you can contact them to request this) to see for certain. I doubt it would be an even split between the three years though - usually each progressive year is weighted more heavily than the last so your final year counts the most to your overall classification.
0
reply
Uni of Southampton Students
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#13
Report 3 months ago
#13
(Original post by Gululululu)
I've applied to Arts University Bournemouth and Solent University, but if I do move into student accommodation it will have to be privately as the halls AUB offer are too expensive and the Solent ones seem horrible

I think moving into halls for the first year is a good idea, but would it be a waste of money if i stayed at home during weekends and holidays?
I know someone that stayed in Solent accommodation and they had a brilliant time there, they said the rooms were nice (he had a larger room) and overall it was really nice accommodation. I believe it was called 'Chantry Student Residence'. Have you had a look at any of the accommodation in person yet? That may change your mind on private accommodation.

As for going home at weekends, I personally think you may end up having such a good time in halls that you find yourself wanting to stay over the weekends (and you will probably have some uni work to keep you busy as well ). Plus the weekends are prime time for socialising and having fun with friends. Over the holidays it is usual for students to head home for a couple of weeks so you will not be wasting money in that regard. However, if you do fancy heading home for the odd weekend that is obviously fine, do whatever makes you most happy and comfortable.

What are you thinking of studying at uni?

Jasmine (an Official University of Southampton Rep)
Last edited by Uni of Southampton Students; 3 months ago
0
reply
Gululululu
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#14
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#14
(Original post by Uni of Southampton Students)
I know someone that stayed in Solent accommodation and they had a brilliant time there, they said the rooms were nice (he had a larger room) and overall it was really nice accommodation. I believe it was called 'Chantry Student Residence'. Have you had a look at any of the accommodation in person yet? That may change your mind on private accommodation.

As for going home at weekends, I personally think you may end up having such a good time in halls that you find yourself wanting to stay over the weekends (and you will probably have some uni work to keep you busy as well ). Plus the weekends are prime time for socialising and having fun with friends. Over the holidays it is usual for students to head home for a couple of weeks so you will not be wasting money in that regard. However, if you do fancy heading home for the odd weekend that is obviously fine, do whatever makes you most happy and comfortable.

What are you thinking of studying at uni?

Jasmine (an Official University of Southampton Rep)
I've seen some of the solent accommodations in person and I didn't like them, mainly because of the bathrooms and kitchens so I think a self contained studio from private halls is a better option for me if I do decide to move out

And I think I'd prefer going home on the weekends but i just need to figure out what's happening to my room if I leave

I'm hoping to study Costume, Fashion or Fashion styling!
0
reply
Uni of Southampton Students
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#15
Report 3 months ago
#15
(Original post by Gululululu)
I've seen some of the solent accommodations in person and I didn't like them, mainly because of the bathrooms and kitchens so I think a self contained studio from private halls is a better option for me if I do decide to move out

And I think I'd prefer going home on the weekends but i just need to figure out what's happening to my room if I leave

I'm hoping to study Costume, Fashion or Fashion styling!
That's great that you've had a look round and decided they aren't really for you, it is always best to do what makes you the most comfortable.

Costume, Fashion or Fashion styling sound like great courses!

Do you prefer AUB or Solent for these courses?

Is there anything you would like to know about Southampton that I can help you with?

Jasmine (an Official University of Southampton Rep)
0
reply
jonathanemptage
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#16
Report 3 months ago
#16
(Original post by Gululululu)
I've applied to Arts University Bournemouth and Solent University, but if I do move into student accommodation it will have to be privately as the halls AUB offer are too expensive and the Solent ones seem horrible

I think moving into halls for the first year is a good idea, but would it be a waste of money if i stayed at home during weekends and holidays?
Which Solent ones did you look at because Denary and Kimber are pretty nice I lived in Denary it was ok I had view of a little grassy patch and a tree (amazing right)...Seriously though the rooms aren't uncomfortable once you've got some posters up a nice cover and duvet on your bed and other personal effects it's fairly comfortable.

Another option is Mercury Point I lived there too it's just over the road from Deanery but the rooms are much bigger and it's a little more comfortable.It still has all the amenities like it's a short walk to the university and an even shorter walk to town. It's also close to the take aways in St Marys' (Check out Super Pizza one of the nicest pizza take away places I've ever been to).
0
reply
Solent University, Southampton
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#17
Report 3 months ago
#17
(Original post by Gululululu)
I've applied to Arts University Bournemouth and Solent University, but if I do move into student accommodation it will have to be privately as the halls AUB offer are too expensive and the Solent ones seem horrible

I think moving into halls for the first year is a good idea, but would it be a waste of money if i stayed at home during weekends and holidays?
Hi Gululululu, choosing where to live is very important. From experience, I would say staying in halls is a great way to meet fellow students. I spent my first year in halls, Hamwic to be specific. It was different to home life, like many places will be. But every time I walk by the room I had, I think "it was great there, my first real slice of independence." From here you can then look to move into private halls, shared houses and so on in second year. I personally have loved living away from home, it was the best decision for me. I could have commuted by train or car but the life experiences you will gain will be so worth it.

If you need any more information let me know. Isaac
0
reply
SupposedlyIronic
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#18
Report 3 months ago
#18
I'm still deciding this one myself. After a brief try at uni last year I'd say in your position it would be good to get student accommodation. Most people are at least somewhat nervous about it but it does really improve the social aspect of things.

You could always seek outside student accommodation? I found it was often nicer anyway.
0
reply
PinkMobilePhone
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#19
Report 3 months ago
#19
I lived at home simply because I owned my own house. It was convenient, sure, but I definitely lacked in the social life department.

I've told my kids that although I respect their decisions, I would encourage them to try halls when they apply for uni. There aren't all that many opportunities in life to really get that sort of social side of things - it's definitely not the same when you start working and really have to "grow up".
You're only young once - live it.
0
reply
Uni of Southampton Students
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#20
Report 3 months ago
#20
(Original post by Gululululu)
I was wondering if anyone has any advice on how to decide whether to stay at home or move to student halls while at uni

Both Universities I'm applying to are about 1 hour away from home with public transport which isn't too bad but it would be annoying to have that journey potentially every day.

I want to live in halls as I want to know what it's like to live by my ow, it would be a better environment to study in and apparently its easier to make friends that way, which is good for me as I really struggle with socializing.
But then again there's also a big chance that I will hate it and that I'll be scared of everyone living there and I don't really want to spend a year being more anxious than I already am but there's no way of knowing what will happen which makes it difficult
And what also worries me is that I won't be able to move back home if i decide to leave- at least not to my room
And where will i store all of my things if i leave?

Sorry that its quite a lot to read but i hope someone has some advice
Hi Gululululu!

I completely understand you being nervous, I'm an international student so I was very nervous about halls and I'm also naturally very shy so I struggle with putting myself out there and socializing. Being nervous to move away from home is completely normal.

I'd definitely say take the big step and live in halls. It sounds like it's an experience you'd like to have and trying something unfamiliar to us is always uncomfortable and nerve-wracking, but it's all part of it. It is definitely easier to make friends as you already live with people you see everyday and it really makes your first year uni experience since almost everyone does it, and everyone is in the same boat as you.

I took a while to settle into my room, so don't worry if you hate it at first, everyone struggles with suddenly feeling at home somewhere new. It would be best to look at the different halls for different unis to find one that appeals to you, then decide if you'd rather be catered or self catered, in a quiet flat or an alcohol free flat. It's very unlikely you'd be scared of people living there since it's everyone's first experience.

If you do decide to leave and can't move back home, it is only for one year after which you can find out what you prefer (some friends of mine realized they didn't like sharing so they got a studio), you can get private student accommodation buildings which are usually quite nicer than halls, or you might even make friends you like enough in the first year that you choose to move in with.

As for storing your things, what you do is find a storage facility in the area and reserve a room (they're very helpful and if you explain your room size or number of boxes they can tell you the best options), order your moving boxes (I got mine online and 10 medium boxes plus a suitcase held all my things and I have a lot more stuff than most people). Then you simply pack your things inside and take it to the storage facility (a friend can drive you or you can order a taxi like I did).

I would say don't worry too much. I get very stressed when I don't like my room, so for me it was very important that I liked the layout of the room itself and the size of it (I don't like feeling cramped). After that I invested money in decorations so things like rugs, posters and fairy lights which might seem like a waste of money for most people but for me it was very important. So don't disregard bring pictures or pillows or bedsheets from home; do whatever helps you to feel comfortable and at home in your room!

I hope this has eased some of your anxiety about moving, and feel free to leave any more questions if you have them!

Jade
An Official Rep for University of Southampton.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (0)
0%
The paper was reasonable (1)
100%
Not feeling great about that exam... (0)
0%
It was TERRIBLE (0)
0%

Watched Threads

View All