is getting a 2:2 really that bad?

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Anonymous #1
#1
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Currently in third year and it's not going well. I hope I get a 2:1 but there's still the possibility that I'll get a 2:2. Would this make it difficult to find a job or get accepted to masters courses?
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Cote1
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#2
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There are lots of employers who won't mind if you get a 2:2.
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lalenemalik1998
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#3
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2.2 is not that bad as i got it too in my undergrad but i would highly suggest to put in extra work in your disso as it can bring your marks quite a lot
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Anonymous #1
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I don't really know what to do, I don't have a lot of experience (just a few years volunteering prior to starting uni and an 8 month research project last summer) so I'm not exactly an ideal candidate for employers. Getting another degree doesn't seem worth it but master courses also seem out of reach. Does anyone have any advice?
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Cote1
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I would focus on getting as good a degree as you can. Don't worry too much as a lot of employers don't care if it is a 2:2.

What kind of job or area do you want to move into, if you are considering a masters?
Last edited by Cote1; 3 months ago
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Cote1)
I would focus on getting as good a degree as you can. Don't worry too much as a lot of employers don't care if it is a 2:2.

What kind of job or area do you want to move into, if you are considering a Masters?
Hey, thank you for the reply. I was on track to get a first (I averaged 70%+ for year 1 and 2 ) but my third year project didn't go well and I'll be lucky to get even 50%. I'm still considering whether to do a masters but otherwise I've been looking to go into science communication. I looked at some jobs but they all require a 2:1 or a masters :/
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Cote1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey, thank you for the reply. I was on track to get a first (I averaged 70%+ for year 1 and 2 ) but my third year project didn't go well and I'll be lucky to get even 50%. I'm still considering whether to do a masters but otherwise I've been looking to go into science communication. I looked at some jobs but they all require a 2:1 or a masters :/
I don't know anything about this area. You could research areas you can work in if you get a 2:2.
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Abzino1
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You can definitely still get jobs. Ive applied to a lot of private companies and have received responses.

Also, lots of schemes in the public allow you to apply with a 2:2.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Abzino1)
You can definitely still get jobs. Ive applied to a lot of private companies and have received responses.

Also, lots of schemes in the public allow you to apply with a 2:2.
Is there anything else I can do to seem more employable? and by "in the public" are you referring to a specific sector?
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Currently in third year and it's not going well. I hope I get a 2:1 but there's still the possibility that I'll get a 2:2. Would this make it difficult to find a job or get accepted to masters courses?
The value of a degree classification is losing meaning. Some employers are apparently thinking of removing a degree as a requirement for employment.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
The value of a degree classification is losing meaning. Some employers are apparently thinking of removing a degree as a requirement for employment.
But a lot of the graduate roles I come across seem to ask for a 2:1 minimum..
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mnot
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It will certainly restrict your options on the graduate job market, and ability to apply to competitive masters courses but it’s not the end of the world, their are masters & jobs you can go for.
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Cote1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
But a lot of the graduate roles I come across seem to ask for a 2:1 minimum..
You should also focus your research on jobs and careers where a 2:1 is not required.
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Abzino1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Is there anything else I can do to seem more employable? and by "in the public" are you referring to a specific sector?
Yeah sorry that was a typo, I meant to say public sector*. Have a look at NGDP, NHS GMTS, Civil Service Fast Stream, TFL, Mi5 and also direct entry roles. The best thing about these ones is that they are meritocratic, therefore your CV and work experience doesn't matter. The best thing you can do is revise and research as much as possible. Im currently applying for all of these.

Private sector roles are available too, one of the top schemes that allow 2:2 grads is EY. But there are also small and mid size companies who will take you. For these, try to get as much experience as you can. This will allow you to answer those tough questions and give you confidence.

Edit: remember once you get in and gain experience, that degree becomes redundant. So be resilient!
Last edited by Abzino1; 3 months ago
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Cote1
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(Original post by Abzino1)
Yeah sorry that was a typo, I meant to say public sector*. Have a look at NGDP, NHS GMTS, Civil Service Fast Stream, TFL, Mi5 and also direct entry roles. The best thing about these ones is that they are meritocratic, therefore your CV and work experience doesn't matter. The best thing you can do is revise and research as much as possible. Im currently applying for all of these.

Private sector roles are available too, one of the top schemes that allow 2:2 grads is EY. But there are also small and mid size companies who will take you. For these, try to get as much experience as you can. This will allow you to answer those tough questions and give you confidence.

Edit: remember once you get in and gain experience, that degree becomes redundant. So be resilient!
Useful suggestions.
Last edited by Cote1; 3 months ago
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Abzino1)
Yeah sorry that was a typo, I meant to say public sector*. Have a look at NGDP, NHS GMTS, Civil Service Fast Stream, TFL, Mi5 and also direct entry roles. The best thing about these ones is that they are meritocratic, therefore your CV and work experience doesn't matter. The best thing you can do is revise and research as much as possible. Im currently applying for all of these.

Private sector roles are available too, one of the top schemes that allow 2:2 grads is EY. But there are also small and mid size companies who will take you. For these, try to get as much experience as you can. This will allow you to answer those tough questions and give you confidence.
Thank you for the advice. I'm not very familiar with the public sector and have never considered it as an area that I would work in. So, it would be best to focus on lesser known/smaller companies and slowly work my way up?
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Cote1
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Definitely - it is far from being the end of the world.
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Abzino1
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#18
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thank you for the advice. I'm not very familiar with the public sector and have never considered it as an area that I would work in. So, it would be best to focus on lesser known/smaller companies and slowly work my way up?
No, definitely apply. Even if you dont get in, the experience is invaluable. For instance the Civil Service Fast Stream has really built up my confidence, I feel different to how I was prior to applying. Also, keep in mind that these schemes have different path ways, such as economics, finance, policy etc. So options are available to you.

I think grad schemes should be big focus, they help train you at a fast pace with a variety of exposure in different areas of work. So you should always be applying to them imo..
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Admit-One
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#19
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As above, definitely not the end of the world. For your first role out of uni it may limit your choices somewhat, (especially for competitive grad programs). But once you have a year or two’s experience, it should not be a hindrance.

I’ve got a 2:2 and have worked quite extensively in Finance and Higher Education.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Abzino1)
No, definitely apply. Even if you dont get in, the experience is invaluable. For instance the Civil Service Fast Stream has really built up my confidence, I feel different to how I was prior to applying. Also, keep in mind that these schemes have different path ways, such as economics, finance, policy etc. So options are available to you.

I think grad schemes should be big focus, they help train you at a fast pace with a variety of exposure in different areas of work. So you should always be applying to them imo..
Thanks, this is really helpful and has made me feel better. The Civil Service Fast Stream applications are closed so I'll have to wait to apply. In the mean time I think I'll start looking at grad schemes that don't require a specific degree as they tend to accept 2:2 (or don't look at grades at all).
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