LSE MSc Behavioural Science?

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mango.honeyy
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#1
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#1
Hi all, I received an unconditional offer from LSE for their MSc Behavioural Science program. I am from the states, and I would appreciate to hear from others who are in the program to learn more about your experience in the program.

A few questions I have are:
1. Did you secure funding from the Graduate Support Scheme (GSS)? If so, how much?
2. Did you secure funding from other LSE scholarships? If so, when were you informed?
3. How rigorous is the program?
4. What is the grading scale and methodology like?
5. What is the process for the dissertation like? Do you have an advisor for this?
6. What are job prospects like? In the UK, US, or Internationally?
7. What academic support programs are available to graduate students? (e.g., writing center, career center, tutoring, etc.)
8. What support systems are in place for students with a documented disability? (e.g., ADHD).
9. Is there anything else pertinent to the program that I should know about?
Last edited by mango.honeyy; 3 months ago
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artful_lounger
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I'm not doing this course so I have no idea about funding, but in general I imagine it's pretty rigorous as LSE is typically regarded as one of the top universities in the country and arguably the best for most social sciences courses (as it is their specialism). Grading will be in the standard UK taught postgrad format where you are graded fail/pass/merit/distinction; you can read more on how graduate programmes are classified here: https://info.lse.ac.uk/staff/divisio...G-students.pdf

Note unlike the US format of grading, it's essentially impossible to get 100%, or even more than 85% in most cases, in anything other than a mathematical methods or logic type course. There is a lot of "room at the top" and a 70-75% (distinction) is equivalent to an A/A+ in US style courses - the higher scores allow students to distinguish themselves with work beyond the expected level of a masters students (i.e. publishable quality work, or original research even if not of publishable standard yet).

Job prospects is entirely variable and dependent on the student. LSE generally has a pretty strong international reputation and is targeted by investment banks and management consulting firms within the UK (and I imagine, internationally) for example. However simple getting a degree with LSE on it isn't going to even guarantee you an interview for whatever role(s) you are interested in - you still need to have relevant work experience/internships etc, and present this in a convincing manner in your application. However it will prevent you being auto filtered out by e.g. investment banks and similar in the early stages.
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mango.honeyy
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#3
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I'm not doing this course so I have no idea about funding, but in general I imagine it's pretty rigorous as LSE is typically regarded as one of the top universities in the country and arguably the best for most social sciences courses (as it is their specialism). Grading will be in the standard UK taught postgrad format where you are graded fail/pass/merit/distinction; you can read more on how graduate programmes are classified here: https://info.lse.ac.uk/staff/divisio...G-students.pdf

Note unlike the US format of grading, it's essentially impossible to get 100%, or even more than 85% in most cases, in anything other than a mathematical methods or logic type course. There is a lot of "room at the top" and a 70-75% (distinction) is equivalent to an A/A+ in US style courses - the higher scores allow students to distinguish themselves with work beyond the expected level of a masters students (i.e. publishable quality work, or original research even if not of publishable standard yet).

Job prospects is entirely variable and dependent on the student. LSE generally has a pretty strong international reputation and is targeted by investment banks and management consulting firms within the UK (and I imagine, internationally) for example. However simple getting a degree with LSE on it isn't going to even guarantee you an interview for whatever role(s) you are interested in - you still need to have relevant work experience/internships etc, and present this in a convincing manner in your application. However it will prevent you being auto filtered out by e.g. investment banks and similar in the early stages.
Thank you for your insight! I'm the first in my family to pursue college and grad school, so I'm a bit nervous about how well I will perform in a graduate program. However, I try to remember that I did exceptionally well during undergrad.

Are you an LSE graduate student? If so, I'd love to hear more about your overall experience at LSE.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by mango.honeyy)
Thank you for your insight! I'm the first in my family to pursue college and grad school, so I'm a bit nervous about how well I will perform in a graduate program. However, I try to remember that I did exceptionally well during undergrad.

Are you an LSE graduate student? If so, I'd love to hear more about your overall experience at LSE.
I'm not an LSE student at all so can only comment on what anecdotes I've come across on here previously!

From what I've heard experiences at LSE can be somewhat varied depending on what department you're in and what programme you are pursuing - generally it seems the more "career focused" departments (management/finance/accounting/law/also economics for some reason) can be a bit "toxic" at the undergrad level at least. Others seem to be a lot better - I've heard history and anthropology are pretty genial atmospheres. However at the PG level it might be different anyway since the programmes are a lot shorter and people tend to be a lot more focused in their aims by then.

LeapingLucy was an undergraduate there and might be able to give some general insight into life at LSE - she also made the following thread which might have some useful "new starter" information: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5269264
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mango.honeyy
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I'm not an LSE student at all so can only comment on what anecdotes I've come across on here previously!

From what I've heard experiences at LSE can be somewhat varied depending on what department you're in and what programme you are pursuing - generally it seems the more "career focused" departments (management/finance/accounting/law/also economics for some reason) can be a bit "toxic" at the undergrad level at least. Others seem to be a lot better - I've heard history and anthropology are pretty genial atmospheres. However at the PG level it might be different anyway since the programmes are a lot shorter and people tend to be a lot more focused in their aims by then.

LeapingLucy was an undergraduate there and might be able to give some general insight into life at LSE - she also made the following thread which might have some useful "new starter" information: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5269264
You have a great amount of insight! Thank you so much. I also appreciate you including the "new starter" information thread.
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