Recent Maths graduate considering changing to teaching...

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BenHigham2000
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Hey everyone, This is going to be a ramble but...last summer, I graduated from a top 10 UK Uni with a Maths degree with some statistics thrown in there too. After struggling to find work, I managed to find a job for a bookmaker where I have to determine prices for sporting events etc. As someone who loves sports, ideal right? It's also well paid [£35k ish + bonuses]... yet something just feels wrong. I'm working from home right not so I'm aware that that probably plays a part in the work being boring but I just don't feel like it's... me. The people are lovely but I just don't think it's my crowd [I'm maybe more shy and more "nerdy"?], the work feels unrewarding and like I'm just going through the motions day after day and the hours, although very flexible, require some evenings/weekends [probably ironic]. I just feel like the work isn't stimulating enough.

A teaching career always somewhat interested me, maybe because I had really strong relationships with my teachers throughout school, especially in sixth form. I miss interactions like that etc. and when any of my younger family members have needed help with stuff in school, I've always enjoyed "teaching" them how to do stuff etc rather than just giving them the answer which has made me think.

However I have a few reservations about teaching... I know that I shouldn't care what people think, but I'm a bit concerned people will think that I'm just being unambitious/underachieving [ I know this wouldn't be true, but... you know what I mean]/settling with what I know because I "went to school". I'm also a bit worried that I would just be doing it because it's an environment I know and that I might be missing out on "real life" but I don't know... I'm not particularly motivated by money but given that I am just outside London, I assume I'd be making less money than I am right now for a few years too. I also never really saw many young male teachers straight out of uni when I was in school, so are there additional challenges/stereotypes there? So yeah, I've said my piece and it's long and doesn't have much direction, but thanks if you read it! Any thoughts/responses would be much appreciated.

TLDR A recent maths grad finding current career uninspiring and considering teaching instead
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by BenHigham2000)
Hey everyone, This is going to be a ramble but...last summer, I graduated from a top 10 UK Uni with a Maths degree with some statistics thrown in there too. After struggling to find work, I managed to find a job for a bookmaker where I have to determine prices for sporting events etc. As someone who loves sports, ideal right? It's also well paid [£35k ish + bonuses]... yet something just feels wrong. I'm working from home right not so I'm aware that that probably plays a part in the work being boring but I just don't feel like it's... me. The people are lovely but I just don't think it's my crowd [I'm maybe more shy and more "nerdy"?], the work feels unrewarding and like I'm just going through the motions day after day and the hours, although very flexible, require some evenings/weekends [probably ironic]. I just feel like the work isn't stimulating enough.

A teaching career always somewhat interested me, maybe because I had really strong relationships with my teachers throughout school, especially in sixth form. I miss interactions like that etc. and when any of my younger family members have needed help with stuff in school, I've always enjoyed "teaching" them how to do stuff etc rather than just giving them the answer which has made me think.

However I have a few reservations about teaching... I know that I shouldn't care what people think, but I'm a bit concerned people will think that I'm just being unambitious/underachieving [ I know this wouldn't be true, but... you know what I mean]/settling with what I know because I "went to school". I'm also a bit worried that I would just be doing it because it's an environment I know and that I might be missing out on "real life" but I don't know... I'm not particularly motivated by money but given that I am just outside London, I assume I'd be making less money than I am right now for a few years too. I also never really saw many young male teachers straight out of uni when I was in school, so are there additional challenges/stereotypes there? So yeah, I've said my piece and it's long and doesn't have much direction, but thanks if you read it! Any thoughts/responses would be much appreciated.

TLDR A recent maths grad finding current career uninspiring and considering teaching instead
I went into teaching from a similar position - maths graduate from a good university, worried I might be wasting my potential because some people told me that teaching was only for people with bad degrees. I haven't personally regretted taking this career path though. Like you've said in your post, one of the first things that made me realise I wanted to teach was helping classmates and younger family members with their maths homework, and I honestly get the same feeling now as a teacher that I did then.

To address a few points you bring up:

- I am definitely paid less than what most of my friends from uni are paid. The tax-free bursary did help to make this sting a lot less, and honestly that extra money has been incredibly useful - I know that a colleague of mine was able to save his bursary and it allowed him to get on the property ladder early, which is amazing, though we do live in a 'cheap' area. That being said, it's still definitely something you have to come to terms with, that you won't be earning as much. I have heard of maths teachers being able to negotiate starting higher on the pay scale as they are more in-demand - I didn't do this personally, because the school I'm at is really nice and gets plenty of great applicants even in maths, but I know it happens.

- Young male teachers straight out of uni are plentiful, honestly. When I trained, about 1/3 of the cohort were men and most of them were straight out of uni or maybe 1-2 years out at most. In maths specifically, it was about 50/50 men and women training, and most maths departments I've trained/worked in have skewed male.

- In terms of just going for an environment that's familiar, I also worried about that a bit. At the end of the day though, I really loved attending school and now I've found that I really love teaching in schools. It's definitely a good idea to try to get some experience in a school, just to get an idea of what the teaching side is like before you jump into training. It worked out for me though - a lot of the stuff I enjoyed about school, like the routine and the focus on pure maths, is still there as a teacher.

- Obviously it varies from school to school, but in terms of the 'vibe', most maths departments I've been in have been full of nerds. Not necessarily like 'comic books and D&D' nerds - though there's that too - but just the sort of people who enjoy coming across some random really difficult problem in a textbook and all sitting around and taking a stab at it. Some schools I have heard can have really toxic environments, but for me, my colleagues are one of the big factors that makes me enjoy my job.

Bit long, but I hope that helps with some of your worries! Teaching is tricky because there are so many challenges and especially the first few years can be really stressful, but also it's really rewarding if you're the type of person who likes that sort of thing.
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BenHigham2000
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
I went into teaching from a similar position - maths graduate from a good university, worried I might be wasting my potential because some people told me that teaching was only for people with bad degrees. I haven't personally regretted taking this career path though. Like you've said in your post, one of the first things that made me realise I wanted to teach was helping classmates and younger family members with their maths homework, and I honestly get the same feeling now as a teacher that I did then.

To address a few points you bring up:

- I am definitely paid less than what most of my friends from uni are paid. The tax-free bursary did help to make this sting a lot less, and honestly that extra money has been incredibly useful - I know that a colleague of mine was able to save his bursary and it allowed him to get on the property ladder early, which is amazing, though we do live in a 'cheap' area. That being said, it's still definitely something you have to come to terms with, that you won't be earning as much. I have heard of maths teachers being able to negotiate starting higher on the pay scale as they are more in-demand - I didn't do this personally, because the school I'm at is really nice and gets plenty of great applicants even in maths, but I know it happens.

- Young male teachers straight out of uni are plentiful, honestly. When I trained, about 1/3 of the cohort were men and most of them were straight out of uni or maybe 1-2 years out at most. In maths specifically, it was about 50/50 men and women training, and most maths departments I've trained/worked in have skewed male.

- In terms of just going for an environment that's familiar, I also worried about that a bit. At the end of the day though, I really loved attending school and now I've found that I really love teaching in schools. It's definitely a good idea to try to get some experience in a school, just to get an idea of what the teaching side is like before you jump into training. It worked out for me though - a lot of the stuff I enjoyed about school, like the routine and the focus on pure maths, is still there as a teacher.

- Obviously it varies from school to school, but in terms of the 'vibe', most maths departments I've been in have been full of nerds. Not necessarily like 'comic books and D&D' nerds - though there's that too - but just the sort of people who enjoy coming across some random really difficult problem in a textbook and all sitting around and taking a stab at it. Some schools I have heard can have really toxic environments, but for me, my colleagues are one of the big factors that makes me enjoy my job.

Bit long, but I hope that helps with some of your worries! Teaching is tricky because there are so many challenges and especially the first few years can be really stressful, but also it's really rewarding if you're the type of person who likes that sort of thing.
Honestly, this is great, thanks so much!

Just to be more annoying and ask questions about your post:
How did you react to the "wasting potential"? Right now I sit on my phone scrolling for a lot of my day because I'm bored/ have nothing else to do unless I wanted to do a lot of unnecessary work. I think teaching is similar in that you reap what you sow but maybe if the reaping was helping people rather than making money for someone, I'd be more willing to do it? Idk. When I briefly mentioned it alongside other careers to uncles etc when they were asking about what I was going to do after uni I got some "you dont want to be a teacher though do you??" when telling them (they did poorly in school but now get paid well in the city). I guess people always expected "more from me" (I hate this notion too and I'm not even a teacher but that's what it feels i guess). Did you have similar and how did you deal with it?

On the money, I say I'm not motivated by money but of course, like most I like to have it! I think I'd probably prioritise working at a nice school (I've wondered if I'd work at the school I went to because it has that kind of environment I think, but idk if I'd want to or if theyd have an ex-student) than the extra money though. I've always been a shrewd spender so I have got a lot of money saved up (~£30k) so money wouldnt be an immediate concern. How much does wage progress and is it done by experience/ performance etc?

How do you find being a young Male teacher? I assume colleagues are fine but how do the students react to you? Re: the school environment, thayd partially what I don't like with this job. The work days are really flexible which is great, but I barely get 2 days off in a row which makes me feel like I never get a proper break, even with more time off than most grad jobs. As I said earlier with not doing much at work, I feel like I'm letting myself down and wasting myself, whereas although the work would be a lot when teaching, I feel like I'd be proactive at least? What hours would you say you do on a typical day?


That vibe is exactly what I'd want tbh. I've never touched a comic or D&D in my life but just people like that would be great to work with. Where I am now, it's more "let's go down the pub between events" which isnt me.

Also, with regard to teaching experience before training, what would you recommend? In my second year of uni I got an email from someone from my old school inviting all STEM students to apply for 2 weeks paid work expereince teaching internship. I almost accepted but then COVID happened and I assume it didnt happen.

When in sixth form, I volunteered to go into a year 7 class for a lesson per week to "help" mainly just for something for my UCAS. The teacher never introduced me to the class and I felt REALLY awkward in that barely anyone asked for help and when they did, it was normally something like "what do I do now I'm done " when I'd never spoke to the actual teacher before. I never returned after the first week mainly through awkwardness. The class got moved the next week anyway to a different room and I was never told. I dont know if this puts me off, but the thought of teaching a group of kids right now terrifies me, mainly because I'm shy. Is this normal or a red flag?

Cheers for all the help!!
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Muttley79
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(Original post by BenHigham2000)
Honestly, this is great, thanks so much!

Just to be more annoying and ask questions about your post:
How did you react to the "wasting potential"? Right now I sit on my phone scrolling for a lot of my day because I'm bored/ have nothing else to do unless I wanted to do a lot of unnecessary work. I think teaching is similar in that you reap what you sow but maybe if the reaping was helping people rather than making money for someone, I'd be more willing to do it? Idk. When I briefly mentioned it alongside other careers to uncles etc when they were asking about what I was going to do after uni I got some "you dont want to be a teacher though do you??" when telling them (they did poorly in school but now get paid well in the city). I guess people always expected "more from me" (I hate this notion too and I'm not even a teacher but that's what it feels i guess). Did you have similar and how did you deal with it?

On the money, I say I'm not motivated by money but of course, like most I like to have it! I think I'd probably prioritise working at a nice school (I've wondered if I'd work at the school I went to because it has that kind of environment I think, but idk if I'd want to or if theyd have an ex-student) than the extra money though. I've always been a shrewd spender so I have got a lot of money saved up (~£30k) so money wouldnt be an immediate concern. How much does wage progress and is it done by experience/ performance etc?

How do you find being a young Male teacher? I assume colleagues are fine but how do the students react to you? Re: the school environment, thayd partially what I don't like with this job. The work days are really flexible which is great, but I barely get 2 days off in a row which makes me feel like I never get a proper break, even with more time off than most grad jobs. As I said earlier with not doing much at work, I feel like I'm letting myself down and wasting myself, whereas although the work would be a lot when teaching, I feel like I'd be proactive at least? What hours would you say you do on a typical day?


That vibe is exactly what I'd want tbh. I've never touched a comic or D&D in my life but just people like that would be great to work with. Where I am now, it's more "let's go down the pub between events" which isnt me.

Also, with regard to teaching experience before training, what would you recommend? In my second year of uni I got an email from someone from my old school inviting all STEM students to apply for 2 weeks paid work expereince teaching internship. I almost accepted but then COVID happened and I assume it didnt happen.

When in sixth form, I volunteered to go into a year 7 class for a lesson per week to "help" mainly just for something for my UCAS. The teacher never introduced me to the class and I felt REALLY awkward in that barely anyone asked for help and when they did, it was normally something like "what do I do now I'm done " when I'd never spoke to the actual teacher before. I never returned after the first week mainly through awkwardness. The class got moved the next week anyway to a different room and I was never told. I dont know if this puts me off, but the thought of teaching a group of kids right now terrifies me, mainly because I'm shy. Is this normal or a red flag?

Cheers for all the help!!
How is passing on your love of maths and inspiring young people 'wasting your talent'? Teaching is a brilliant job - when you see someone understand something they have struggled with it's so rewarding. Watching nervous Year 7s through the school until they go off to uni is just amazing ...

Can you negotiate an afternoon off to get into a school?

One warning - do not choose 'Teach First' - aim for a uni based PGCE.
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Turning_A_Corner
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You’re not wasting your potential. At times you may feel you’re wasting your life though. All the stuff they say about teaching taking over your life is true. You’ll never work harder in your life and you may yearn for those days of scrolling through your phone.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
You
And you taught for how long?
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BenHigham2000
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(Original post by Muttley79)
How is passing on your love of maths and inspiring young people 'wasting your talent'? Teaching is a brilliant job - when you see someone understand something they have struggled with it's so rewarding. Watching nervous Year 7s through the school until they go off to uni is just amazing ...

Can you negotiate an afternoon off to get into a school?

One warning - do not choose 'Teach First' - aim for a uni based PGCE.
I agree with you, I didnt mean to disrespect teachers at all, I have huge respect for them! It's just a feeling of "with this degree, I could make a lot of money and be very desirable for big companies" and although I dont think I want that, I'm not sure. I definitely could get time off, even a week etc if I wanted to, but is it as simple as just going to a school and asking?

I also dont know about going in this soon after graduating. Reckon it's worth waiting a while?
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Turning_A_Corner
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(Original post by Muttley79)
And you taught for how long?
Me? 12 years in various contexts. I’ve taught EFL at home and abroad, in further education colleges, secondary schools, tutoring, cover supervision, supply teaching…you name it I’ve done it at one point or another.
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BenHigham2000
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(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
You’re not wasting your potential. At times you may feel you’re wasting your life though. All the stuff they say about teaching taking over your life is true. You’ll never work harder in your life and you may yearn for those days of scrolling through your phone.
Is the first sentence about teaching or what I'm doing now? I'm sure you're right with the rest, but when looking back on my life, do I want to look back on years sat in my phone or years spent helping others? (serious question I guess, I don't know the answer)
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Turning_A_Corner
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(Original post by BenHigham2000)
Is the first sentence about teaching or what I'm doing now? I'm sure you're right with the rest, but when looking back on my life, do I want to look back on years sat in my phone or years spent helping others? (serious question I guess, I don't know the answer)
It’s about teaching. Can feel like Groundhog Day and it is tough as anything.
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skylark2
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If it's what you want to do, it's not wasting your potential. Society would collapse in short order if everyone turned their back on the things they want to do in order to do things that other people have decided are "prestigious".
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by BenHigham2000)
Honestly, this is great, thanks so much!

Just to be more annoying and ask questions about your post:
How did you react to the "wasting potential"? Right now I sit on my phone scrolling for a lot of my day because I'm bored/ have nothing else to do unless I wanted to do a lot of unnecessary work. I think teaching is similar in that you reap what you sow but maybe if the reaping was helping people rather than making money for someone, I'd be more willing to do it? Idk. When I briefly mentioned it alongside other careers to uncles etc when they were asking about what I was going to do after uni I got some "you dont want to be a teacher though do you??" when telling them (they did poorly in school but now get paid well in the city). I guess people always expected "more from me" (I hate this notion too and I'm not even a teacher but that's what it feels i guess). Did you have similar and how did you deal with it?

On the money, I say I'm not motivated by money but of course, like most I like to have it! I think I'd probably prioritise working at a nice school (I've wondered if I'd work at the school I went to because it has that kind of environment I think, but idk if I'd want to or if theyd have an ex-student) than the extra money though. I've always been a shrewd spender so I have got a lot of money saved up (~£30k) so money wouldnt be an immediate concern. How much does wage progress and is it done by experience/ performance etc?

How do you find being a young Male teacher? I assume colleagues are fine but how do the students react to you? Re: the school environment, thayd partially what I don't like with this job. The work days are really flexible which is great, but I barely get 2 days off in a row which makes me feel like I never get a proper break, even with more time off than most grad jobs. As I said earlier with not doing much at work, I feel like I'm letting myself down and wasting myself, whereas although the work would be a lot when teaching, I feel like I'd be proactive at least? What hours would you say you do on a typical day?


That vibe is exactly what I'd want tbh. I've never touched a comic or D&D in my life but just people like that would be great to work with. Where I am now, it's more "let's go down the pub between events" which isnt me.

Also, with regard to teaching experience before training, what would you recommend? In my second year of uni I got an email from someone from my old school inviting all STEM students to apply for 2 weeks paid work expereince teaching internship. I almost accepted but then COVID happened and I assume it didnt happen.

When in sixth form, I volunteered to go into a year 7 class for a lesson per week to "help" mainly just for something for my UCAS. The teacher never introduced me to the class and I felt REALLY awkward in that barely anyone asked for help and when they did, it was normally something like "what do I do now I'm done " when I'd never spoke to the actual teacher before. I never returned after the first week mainly through awkwardness. The class got moved the next week anyway to a different room and I was never told. I dont know if this puts me off, but the thought of teaching a group of kids right now terrifies me, mainly because I'm shy. Is this normal or a red flag?

Cheers for all the help!!
I came to realise that the people who thought I was 'wasting my potential' didn't have the same priorities as me - they usually assumed that my career goal would be to make a lot of money, which is fine for some people, but not for me. All the people I am close to have accepted now that teaching is what I enjoy and I don't get any comments about it now.

Wage progression is based on performance management. I know different schools manage it different ways, but essentially you sit down with your performance reviewer (usually this will be your head of department or somebody in the department with another additional responsibility) and set three goals at the start of the year. Usually the school pretty much picks these for you, with some small bit of flexibility. Then through the year, you have a midway review and then a final review. If you can show you've made progress towards the goals, you jump up on the pay scale. I don't know what it's like at other schools, but at my school it's pretty much the case that you always go up unless you're really messing around, it's not like an extra effort on top of the work you're already doing, you naturally meet the goals while doing your job. You can find the pay scale here: https://neu.org.uk/pay-scales

I'm not a man, but I think for both men and women, the first couple of years can be tricky if you are young as kids do pick up on that. You just have to be firm and show that you won't take any nonsense, and they quickly realise that your age doesn't mean they can take advantage.

In terms of hours, I tend to work 7:30 - 16:30, with at least one day a week where I'll stay til 17:00 for a meeting, and on Fridays I leave at 15:30. I sometimes end up doing 2-3 hours on a Saturday, if I'm not organised enough during the week. I definitely worked longer hours in my training year and first year teaching, but equally I know my older colleagues work less. It also depends a lot on the school - I know some of my friends in other schools have to take marking home every night and have two meetings every single week on top of that.

In terms of teaching experience, I would recommend just trying to get into a local secondary school to observe some lessons. You can contact the people at Get Into Teaching if you are struggling to organise your own work experience. I know that before I got any experience in schools, I did feel a bit daunted by the idea of teaching a bunch of students, but I warmed up to it quite quickly.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
Me? 12 years in various contexts. I’ve taught EFL at home and abroad, in further education colleges, secondary schools, tutoring, cover supervision, supply teaching…you name it I’ve done it at one point or another.
So how long in a full-time permanent post in one school? That is a very different job and much more fulfilling..
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Turning_A_Corner
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(Original post by Muttley79)
So how long in a full-time permanent post in one school? That is a very different job and much more fulfilling..
I’ve worked for two years at maximum. Regardless of this, the aspects of teaching that infringe into your life are fairly consistent wherever and for however long you work as a teacher. It’s not a job that’s easily parked at the end of the day. You’re committed to taking holidays at the most expensive times of the year. There’s a lot of unpaid work. It’s not just a matter of teaching your subject. Then there’s safeguarding, there’s behavioural management, differentiation of classroom activities/learning, dinner time supervision, resource preparation, lesson planning. The smallest part of the job is often the part that draws you in to the job and I would say this of the allied health professions and medicine as well, although those are more easily parked in many respects. I deliberate walked away from teaching because I needed a job where I wasn’t “on” all the time. If you value a good work life balance, it’s just worth making sure that you know what you’re getting into first.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
I’ve worked for two years at maximum. .... Then there’s safeguarding, there’s behavioural management, differentiation of classroom activities/learning, dinner time supervision, resource preparation, lesson planning. The smallest part of the job is often the part that draws you in to the job and I would say this of the allied health professions and medicine as well,
Dinner time supervision is optional - you CANNOT be made to do it in unpaid time. You must be paid extra if you choose to do it - did you join a union?

Just because the job didn't suit you, please don't put others off! I teach Maths and have done so for some time - I love it! Al the things you mention get easier and two years in a school is nothing really. You've never seen a cohort through and that part of the joy of the job.
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Indililam1
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I don't mean to derail the conversation, but thank you for making this thread. Although I'm in Year 14, I'm also interested in teaching maths as a career and, honestly, could have written this word for word myself.
Everything you said about others' judgement, including wasted potential and their confusion as to why you'd pick teaching over a finance-related job, hits so close to home for me, particularly as I'm just about to firm my favourite, slightly lower-ranked university over the other "top 10" institutions I have received offers from because it has better prospects for teaching. Criticism has been at an all-time high right now, so I'm glad I'm not the only person who feels this way.
I've been dead set on teaching for years now after experiencing the impact my teachers' kindness and determination had on me. I've worked with children with additional learning needs and done a bit of work in a classroom (my experience also went exactly as you described!) - the joy it brings me is immeasurable - but sometimes others' judgement is really off-putting.
Sorry for the ramble, I hope teaching works out for you!
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Turning_A_Corner
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Dinner time supervision is optional - you CANNOT be made to do it in unpaid time. You must be paid extra if you choose to do it - did you join a union?

Just because the job didn't suit you, please don't put others off! I teach Maths and have done so for some time - I love it! Al the things you mention get easier and two years in a school is nothing really. You've never seen a cohort through and that part of the joy of the job.
I’m not trying to put people off. I’m telling people to go in with eyes open. Teaching is the most rewarding occupation imaginable…when you’re allowed to actually do it. And there’s a lot of reasons why people burn out, leave or choose alternatives and maths as a subject gives you lots of alternatives. It’s worth exploring all your options if you have them
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Muttley79
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#18
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#18
(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
I’m not trying to put people off. I’m telling people to go in with eyes open. Teaching is the most rewarding occupation imaginable…when you’re allowed to actually do it. And there’s a lot of reasons why people burn out, leave or choose alternatives and maths as a subject gives you lots of alternatives. It’s worth exploring all your options if you have them
What do you mean 'when you're allowed to do it'?????
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BenHigham2000
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#19
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#19
(Original post by skylark2)
If it's what you want to do, it's not wasting your potential. Society would collapse in short order if everyone turned their back on the things they want to do in order to do things that other people have decided are "prestigious".
I get that, I'm just worried about giving up an easy job for something like teaching which although I like the sound of now, I could hate.

(Original post by bluebeetle)
I came to realise that the people who thought I was 'wasting my potential' didn't have the same priorities as me - they usually assumed that my career goal would be to make a lot of money, which is fine for some people, but not for me. All the people I am close to have accepted now that teaching is what I enjoy and I don't get any comments about it now.

Wage progression is based on performance management. I know different schools manage it different ways, but essentially you sit down with your performance reviewer (usually this will be your head of department or somebody in the department with another additional responsibility) and set three goals at the start of the year. Usually the school pretty much picks these for you, with some small bit of flexibility. Then through the year, you have a midway review and then a final review. If you can show you've made progress towards the goals, you jump up on the pay scale. I don't know what it's like at other schools, but at my school it's pretty much the case that you always go up unless you're really messing around, it's not like an extra effort on top of the work you're already doing, you naturally meet the goals while doing your job. You can find the pay scale here: https://neu.org.uk/pay-scales

I'm not a man, but I think for both men and women, the first couple of years can be tricky if you are young as kids do pick up on that. You just have to be firm and show that you won't take any nonsense, and they quickly realise that your age doesn't mean they can take advantage.

In terms of hours, I tend to work 7:30 - 16:30, with at least one day a week where I'll stay til 17:00 for a meeting, and on Fridays I leave at 15:30. I sometimes end up doing 2-3 hours on a Saturday, if I'm not organised enough during the week. I definitely worked longer hours in my training year and first year teaching, but equally I know my older colleagues work less. It also depends a lot on the school - I know some of my friends in other schools have to take marking home every night and have two meetings every single week on top of that.

In terms of teaching experience, I would recommend just trying to get into a local secondary school to observe some lessons. You can contact the people at Get Into Teaching if you are struggling to organise your own work experience. I know that before I got any experience in schools, I did feel a bit daunted by the idea of teaching a bunch of students, but I warmed up to it quite quickly.
Appreciate it again! Think I'd be on £26k to start with, that's a bigger jump than expected.

Do you think that being young helps you in any way or is it just an obstacle? I'm not sure if it's worth staying out of teaching for a few years to get some "real life" experience. I assume you manage to do your marking/ lesson planning in free periods/ time before and after school then if you don't do much from home?

I find it quite daunting too i guess because I've always been shy and not as someone to control people, but I've always been good with kids. My 1 lesson "helping" has scared me a bit though. Not sure if that was just bad prep by the teacher though to not introduce me or give me stuff to help with. I'm just worried because I see a lot of people (mainly on the wonderful site of reddit) say that it takes over too much of your life and theres a really high early quitting rate for a reason
Last edited by BenHigham2000; 3 months ago
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BenHigham2000
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Muttley79)
Dinner time supervision is optional - you CANNOT be made to do it in unpaid time. You must be paid extra if you choose to do it - did you join a union?

Just because the job didn't suit you, please don't put others off! I teach Maths and have done so for some time - I love it! Al the things you mention get easier and two years in a school is nothing really. You've never seen a cohort through and that part of the joy of the job.
Saying this, on the wonderful site of reddit I have seen a LOT of people saying that taking a few years out of school before going back is advisable and that 50% stop teaching inside 5 years for a reason, but saying that, that is Reddit so not sure how true that is.

(Original post by Indililam1)
I don't mean to derail the conversation, but thank you for making this thread. Although I'm in Year 14, I'm also interested in teaching maths as a career and, honestly, could have written this word for word myself.
Everything you said about others' judgement, including wasted potential and their confusion as to why you'd pick teaching over a finance-related job, hits so close to home for me, particularly as I'm just about to firm my favourite, slightly lower-ranked university over the other "top 10" institutions I have received offers from because it has better prospects for teaching. Criticism has been at an all-time high right now, so I'm glad I'm not the only person who feels this way.
I've been dead set on teaching for years now after experiencing the impact my teachers' kindness and determination had on me. I've worked with children with additional learning needs and done a bit of work in a classroom (my experience also went exactly as you described!) - the joy it brings me is immeasurable - but sometimes others' judgement is really off-putting.
Sorry for the ramble, I hope teaching works out for you!
Glad to know I'm not the only one! I'm not really sure what to think about it all

What happened on your teaching experience? Cant be worse than mine. I havent had any other experiences but on the few occasions I've been introduced to a kid(although normally younger than Secondary age), I enjoy interacting with them etc.

I don't normally get nervous but imagine I would be with this. Especially taking a pay cut for what'll probably be a few years for it when theres apparently such a high early quitting rate
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