Suffolk’s Official Rep – Emma (Diagnostic Radiography)

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#1
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#1
Hi! My name is Emma and I’m in my third year studying diagnostic radiography at the University of Suffolk!

My journey to university started in Sixth Form where I studied biology, chemistry and geography and with my background as a volunteer First Aider, I chose to pursue a career in healthcare. I researched around careers in the NHS and then organised work experience in a radiology department and I haven’t looked back since!

I chose to study at UoS because I loved the location (about a 10-minute walk into Ipswich town centre but also a 10-minute walk to lots of open, green spaces!), the size (relatively small compared to universities in cities) and amenities that the university offered and the course provided me with 60% of the time on placement, getting hands-on experience in hospitals in the East of England (including a major trauma centre!)

I started university in September 2019, a few months before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, so I have experience with university and the course before the pandemic, during the pandemic and as of current! I’ve lived in the main student accommodation, Athena Hall in my first year, as well as a shared student house with a few of my friends in my second year. I’ve also attended sports activities such as Zumba, dance, netball and Pilates!

If you have any questions about the University of Suffolk, diagnostic radiography (the course structure, interviews and placement) or student accommodation, then feel free to message me directly or by replying to the post!
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elephanttoe
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#2
Report 4 months ago
#2
hi, I'm hoping to study diagnostic radiography this year
what is the town like in terms of nightlife and just social life in general?
thank you!
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#3
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#3
(Original post by elephanttoe)
hi, I'm hoping to study diagnostic radiography this year
what is the town like in terms of nightlife and just social life in general?
thank you!
Hi elephanttoe, that's great news!!

The University of Suffolk campus is a 10 minute walk in one direction to open space and parks, and it's also a 10 minute walk in the opposite direction to the town centre! In terms of social life, you're able to play sports in the parks, go on lots of walks or go to the gym (there are a few in the area). The university put on lots of events at Freshers (e.g. afternoon tea, wellbeing walks and nights out) to suit a range of students and they're a fantastic opportunity to get to know other students at the university and on your course! The university also offers quite a few societies including British Sign Language, Christian Union, First Aid, environmental society, women's society, BAME society and Students with Disabilities society. We also offer lots of sports clubs at UoS such as netball, badminton, pole fitness, football, zumba, pilates and circuit training. There are different clubs depending on if you'd like to join competitively or to go along with your friends and have a bit of fun for an hour or so

In terms of nightlife, there's a few clubs/ bars in the area where students go for nights out. I'd say that the main two are Unit 17 and Revolution Bar. Events are put on at them throughout Freshers - I remember going to a ball-pit party and a bubble party!! There are also cinemas, bowling, ninja tag, little coffee shops, markets and amazing food places in the area too for other ideas e.g. Kaspa's and Creams!!

I hope this helps and feel free to ask any more questions! Good luck on your university journey

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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Deborah2x
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#4
Report 3 months ago
#4
Hey Emma ,

I have a few questions if you don’t mind me asking..

Do you think having a part-time job is manageable in the 1st year?

What is the ratio between coursework and exams?

How many exams did you sit in your first year and how difficult were they?

Provided that all necessary work placement hours are completed and your not doing re-sits , when will you finish the academic year?

I know some University require students to work through the summer holidays , Does Suffolk require the same?

Thanks
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University of Suffolk student
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#5
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#5
(Original post by Deborah2x)
Hey Emma ,

I have a few questions if you don’t mind me asking..

Do you think having a part-time job is manageable in the 1st year?

What is the ratio between coursework and exams?

How many exams did you sit in your first year and how difficult were they?

Provided that all necessary work placement hours are completed and your not doing re-sits , when will you finish the academic year?

I know some University require students to work through the summer holidays , Does Suffolk require the same?

Thanks
Hi Deborah2x! I'd be more than happy to answer your questions

I think that it's definitely possible to have a part-time job in first year but you have to be able to organise yourself really well in order for it to work out. In first year when we had lectures, we were in university around 3-4 days a week (with 3 x 1.5 hour lectures each day at 09:30-11:00, 11:30-13:00 and 14:00-15:30). We always had Wednesdays and weekends off though so if you had a part-time job, you could organise to work Wednesdays and weekends whilst at the university? However, when you're on placement, you might not have Wednesdays off. When we're on placement, we always get weekends off and we have study day each week (it can be any week day depending on your hospital site) and it could change throughout the three years so there's that to take into consideration when you're looking at part-time work. However, I know a lot of students who commute home and work at the weekends so it's definitely do-able!

In terms of the ratio between coursework and exams, for every module that we take at the university, we have an exam at the end of it. These can either be writing an essay (we had one that was 2500 words long in first year), typical written exams in a hall, making a poster or a PowerPoint presentation, working as a group on a project or having image-viewing exams at the university/ online. There's definitely a good mixture of exam types to suit a range of students I sat six exams in the whole first year for each module and they were a mix of the styles I mentioned above. There were a couple of physics-based modules in first year that I wasn't the biggest fan of as physics isn't my favourite subject, but the lecturers taught us everything we needed to know (that is relevant to radiation physics etc.) and they put on revision sessions in the evenings if we needed extra support too so even if the module seems a bit tricky, there's a lot of support available!

The academic year ends mid-June for all three years and if everything is completed on time, then you don't need to stay behind in the summer to catch up with anything. You can have a nice holiday instead!

I hope this helps to answer your questions and please feel free to ask more if you'd like to!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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Hannah_lynx
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#6
Report 3 months ago
#6
Ah, I'm so glad you've posted this. I had a quick question, I was wondering what kind of pre work could I do before my first year of Radiography. I know a lot of people say anatomy, but I wanted to know more specifically what? and would it be good to get some knowledge on physiology and are there any youtube videos or websites you would recommend for this?
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#7
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#7
(Original post by Hannah_lynx)
Ah, I'm so glad you've posted this. I had a quick question, I was wondering what kind of pre work could I do before my first year of Radiography. I know a lot of people say anatomy, but I wanted to know more specifically what? and would it be good to get some knowledge on physiology and are there any youtube videos or websites you would recommend for this?
Hi Hannah_lynx - that's a great question!

I'd agree and say that anatomy is definitely a key part of the course and can be learnt beforehand including all of the bones in the body e.g. the 8 carpal bones in the wrist is a good bit of anatomy to learn (there are also a few good mnemonics to help learn these). The book called "Bones and Joints" by Gunn (on Amazon for about £37) is a brilliant book to help learn anatomy as it also shows you what the anatomy looks like on radiographs and diagrams! You start learning about physiology quite early on so it would be beneficial to get to grips with that a bit more. There are a few good anatomy & physiology books such as the one by Tortora and Derrickson and another one by Ross and Wilson (on Amazon for about £23). You'll learn about how each body system functions e.g. the cardiovascular system, how the heart works, the anatomy of the heart etc. so even just learning anatomy would put you at an advantage! There are also some nice anatomy colouring books on Amazon if you enjoy colouring in and that might help you learn anatomy The website called "TeachMeAnatomy" is a great online tool as well! I don't think I have any specific YouTube videos that I'd recommend but the channel called "CrashCourse" have some great videos on the different body systems which I found really helpful, otherwise I'd usually just search for whatever I was struggling for e.g. anatomy of an X-Ray tube and they'd be videos on that! In terms of learning any radiation physics, unless you really like physics, you don't have to learn anything beforehand as they'll teach you everything you need to know in lectures and they can put on evening revision sessions if you'd like additional support.

Realistically, a lot of the content you'll learn when you're in lectures and especially when you're on placement in hospitals as you'll be surrounded by people willing to teach you 24/7 and they'll be able to share their expansive knowledge with you! Clark's Pocket Handbook for Radiographers (on Amazon for about about £21) is a staple for training but some of the positioning may be explained slightly differently than what your placement site will do so it's definitely something to take into consideration but it's a brilliant starting point! With the books, you can buy them new or used or some people may be selling them independently for a bit cheaper so it's worth looking around The university also have online copies that you can view via the library's online page!

I hope this helps and bit and feel free to ask any more questions! Congratulations on your offer as well!!!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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Hannah_lynx
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#8
Report 3 months ago
#8
(Original post by University of Suffolk student)
Hi Hannah_lynx - that's a great question!

I'd agree and say that anatomy is definitely a key part of the course and can be learnt beforehand including all of the bones in the body e.g. the 8 carpal bones in the wrist is a good bit of anatomy to learn (there are also a few good mnemonics to help learn these). The book called "Bones and Joints" by Gunn (on Amazon for about £37) is a brilliant book to help learn anatomy as it also shows you what the anatomy looks like on radiographs and diagrams! You start learning about physiology quite early on so it would be beneficial to get to grips with that a bit more. There are a few good anatomy & physiology books such as the one by Tortora and Derrickson and another one by Ross and Wilson (on Amazon for about £23). You'll learn about how each body system functions e.g. the cardiovascular system, how the heart works, the anatomy of the heart etc. so even just learning anatomy would put you at an advantage! There are also some nice anatomy colouring books on Amazon if you enjoy colouring in and that might help you learn anatomy The website called "TeachMeAnatomy" is a great online tool as well! I don't think I have any specific YouTube videos that I'd recommend but the channel called "CrashCourse" have some great videos on the different body systems which I found really helpful, otherwise I'd usually just search for whatever I was struggling for e.g. anatomy of an X-Ray tube and they'd be videos on that! In terms of learning any radiation physics, unless you really like physics, you don't have to learn anything beforehand as they'll teach you everything you need to know in lectures and they can put on evening revision sessions if you'd like additional support.

Realistically, a lot of the content you'll learn when you're in lectures and especially when you're on placement in hospitals as you'll be surrounded by people willing to teach you 24/7 and they'll be able to share their expansive knowledge with you! Clark's Pocket Handbook for Radiographers (on Amazon for about about £21) is a staple for training but some of the positioning may be explained slightly differently than what your placement site will do so it's definitely something to take into consideration but it's a brilliant starting point! With the books, you can buy them new or used or some people may be selling them independently for a bit cheaper so it's worth looking around The university also have online copies that you can view via the library's online page!

I hope this helps and bit and feel free to ask any more questions! Congratulations on your offer as well!!!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
Thank you so much, this has really helped!
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Aimeekornblum
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#9
Report 2 months ago
#9
Hi Emma!

Ive recieved an unconditional offer from Suffolk and debating weather to accept it or not so thank you for this thread!

Do all Uni's have Holidays from June to September? and how long are your December holidays
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#10
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#10
(Original post by Aimeekornblum)
Hi Emma!

Ive recieved an unconditional offer from Suffolk and debating weather to accept it or not so thank you for this thread!

Do all Uni's have Holidays from June to September? and how long are your December holidays
Hi Aimeekornblum - that's fantastic news, congratulations!!!

I was in your situation three years ago and there's really no right or wrong answer - you've just got to go with your gut unfortunately (sorry, not the best advice!) However, I found it really helpful to make a pros and cons list for each university I was considering so I could compare them easily, taking into account things like:
1. The course: does the uni actually offer it? How long is the course (3 years full-time, part-time etc.)? What specific qualifications do you need to apply to the course? What modules it covers and what type of exams they have? (you can usually find these out online on their course pages like ours here)
2. Location: where is the university in relation to your home and your friends? Would you want to live at home and commute in or live on-site? How much would petrol or bus/ train tickets cost to go home (and where is the nearest bus/ train station to the uni)?
3. Accommodation: what does the accommodation look like? Does it have an en-suite? What is the price of accommodation? Do they offer parking? Where is it in relation to the university (for some universities you'll need to get a bus or drive from the accommodation - at UoS many of our accommodation options are less than a 5 minute walk from the uni e.g. Athena Hall, AXO)

In terms of holidays, our time off in the summer for diagnostic radiography is usually always from the end of June to the beginning/ middle of September and our December holidays are all two weeks long covering Christmas and New Year I think most universities have June - September holidays but it's worth double-checking just in case!

Whichever university you choose, I'm sure you'll have an amazing time and good luck with your exams if you have some!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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Loves_running
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#11
Report 2 months ago
#11
(Original post by University of Suffolk student)
Hi Deborah2x! I'd be more than happy to answer your questions

I think that it's definitely possible to have a part-time job in first year but you have to be able to organise yourself really well in order for it to work out. In first year when we had lectures, we were in university around 3-4 days a week (with 3 x 1.5 hour lectures each day at 09:30-11:00, 11:30-13:00 and 14:00-15:30). We always had Wednesdays and weekends off though so if you had a part-time job, you could organise to work Wednesdays and weekends whilst at the university? However, when you're on placement, you might not have Wednesdays off. When we're on placement, we always get weekends off and we have study day each week (it can be any week day depending on your hospital site) and it could change throughout the three years so there's that to take into consideration when you're looking at part-time work. However, I know a lot of students who commute home and work at the weekends so it's definitely do-able!

In terms of the ratio between coursework and exams, for every module that we take at the university, we have an exam at the end of it. These can either be writing an essay (we had one that was 2500 words long in first year), typical written exams in a hall, making a poster or a PowerPoint presentation, working as a group on a project or having image-viewing exams at the university/ online. There's definitely a good mixture of exam types to suit a range of students I sat six exams in the whole first year for each module and they were a mix of the styles I mentioned above. There were a couple of physics-based modules in first year that I wasn't the biggest fan of as physics isn't my favourite subject, but the lecturers taught us everything we needed to know (that is relevant to radiation physics etc.) and they put on revision sessions in the evenings if we needed extra support too so even if the module seems a bit tricky, there's a lot of support available!

The academic year ends mid-June for all three years and if everything is completed on time, then you don't need to stay behind in the summer to catch up with anything. You can have a nice holiday instead!

I hope this helps to answer your questions and please feel free to ask more if you'd like to!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
Hi Emma,
you mentioned a group project being one of the possible exam formats. Is this graded?
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University of Suffolk student
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#12
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#12
(Original post by Loves_running)
Hi Emma,
you mentioned a group project being one of the possible exam formats. Is this graded?
Hi Loves_running! The group project was for our Interprofessional Learning (IPL) module in first year (although I don't think the IPL module runs anymore) and students from different courses came together to make a poster on a case study. The group project was graded but our first year grades do not count towards our overall university grade (you only need to pass the first year exams to progress to second year and the grades for first year do not count for your overall grade at the end of third year). We also didn't have any other group work for second and third year. I hope this makes sense!

Let me know if you have any other questions that you'd like me to answer!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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Loves_running
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#13
Report 2 months ago
#13
(Original post by University of Suffolk student)
Hi Loves_running! The group project was for our Interprofessional Learning (IPL) module in first year (although I don't think the IPL module runs anymore) and students from different courses came together to make a poster on a case study. The group project was graded but our first year grades do not count towards our overall university grade (you only need to pass the first year exams to progress to second year and the grades for first year do not count for your overall grade at the end of third year). We also didn't have any other group work for second and third year. I hope this makes sense!

Let me know if you have any other questions that you'd like me to answer!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
Thank you, that makes sense.
Apologies for asking one question at a time. I should probably make a list and then ask in one go 🙂
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University of Suffolk student
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#14
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#14
(Original post by Loves_running)
Thank you, that makes sense.
Apologies for asking one question at a time. I should probably make a list and then ask in one go 🙂
Hi Loves_running - not at all, it's completely fine!! I know that I was always asking questions before I started university and I probably still do now haha

You never quite know what you don't know anyway, so its difficult to make a list!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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Loves_running
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#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
Me again
How do you find block learning at Suffolk? I do understand that students might like it as they can just focus on one module at a time but don’t you find it boring if you have a whole day of lectures about the same topic?
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#16
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by Loves_running)
Me again
How do you find block learning at Suffolk? I do understand that students might like it as they can just focus on one module at a time but don’t you find it boring if you have a whole day of lectures about the same topic?
Hi Loves_running I completely agree with your comments! I suppose a lot of people like a routine so if we were studying three modules a semester then we'd spend 4.5 hours on one module on Monday, then the same on Tuesday for another module and then the same on Thursday (always the same module on the same weekday!)
Although there's 4.5 hours of the same module a day, you don't cover the same topic in each 1.5 hour lecture: so you might cover the anatomy of the appendicular skeleton in the first lecture and then go onto the anatomy of the axial skeleton in the second, or you might cover dental anatomy in the first lecture and then go on to look at dental radiography equipment in the second lecture. Typically all of the lectures in the day lead on from one another or make sense to have them taught together!

Let me know if you have any other questions too!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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