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Leanne Waters
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#1
Report 17 years ago
#1
Hello UK teachers, I'm a mature age student from Australia. I have approximately one year to go
before I finish my degree. I am very interested in teaching in the UK. There are about five UK
agencies that advertise for Australian teachers in our local newspaper. I have several questions. Is
there a shortage of qualified teachers in the UK. If so, why? Are Australian teachers taking
positions from local people? Overall how do local teachers feel about overseas teachers? I would
also like to hear from any Australian teachers currently working in the UK. I would be interested in
their experiences. Thanks.
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Sheila :-D
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Report 17 years ago
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"leanne waters" <[email protected]> gave up looking for Japan in the atlas and posted:

[q1]>Hello UK teachers, I'm a mature age student from Australia. I have approximately one year to go[/q1]
[q1]>before I finish my degree. I am very interested in teaching in the UK. There are about five UK[/q1]
[q1]>agencies that advertise for Australian teachers in our local newspaper. I have several questions.[/q1]
[q1]>Is there a shortage of qualified teachers in the UK.[/q1]

Yes, in some places, some schools and some subjects.

[q1]>If so, why?[/q1]

Pay, working conditions, pupil and parent discipline, constant change and criticism.

[q1]>Are Australian teachers taking positions from local people?[/q1]

We had an Australian teacher at my school, because we couldn't find a UK one. I don't think UK
teachers are losing jobs because of them. She eventually returned to Australia to become a
policewoman.

[q1]>Overall how do local teachers feel about overseas teachers?[/q1]

We were pleased that we didn't have to cover for that particular class, especially as we don't get
free time, so it would have meant the class being split up around the school.

[q1]>I would also like to hear from any Australian teachers currently working in the UK. I would be[/q1]
[q1]>interested in their experiences. Thanks.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

--
Sheila :-D (Remove e to mail.)
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Dude
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On 15/06/02 8:42, in article [email protected], "leanne waters"
<[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]> Hello UK teachers, I'm a mature age student from Australia. I have approximately one year to go[/q1]
[q1]> before I finish my degree. I am very interested in teaching in the UK. There are about five UK[/q1]
[q1]> agencies that advertise for Australian teachers in our local newspaper. I have several questions.[/q1]
[q1]> Is there a shortage of qualified teachers in the UK. If so, why? Are Australian teachers taking[/q1]
[q1]> positions from local people? Overall how do local teachers feel about overseas teachers? I would[/q1]
[q1]> also like to hear from any Australian teachers currently working in the UK. I would be interested[/q1]
[q1]> in their experiences. Thanks.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
Shortages, yes, here and there. Not taking positions from local people, just aren't enough graduates
to fill the posts. Salaries are crap or limit, and some cities, such as London, prohibitively
expensive, unless you earn a LOT of money, or are prepared to live a life of depressively severe
financial discipline. Teaching as a substitute SUCKS BIG TIME, unless you know the school and the
area. In Australia, discipline (ie kids and parents who RESENT public institutions and all those who
work there) is FAR LESS of a problem, and it is easy to pick an area where you can avoid such issues
- don't want problems in Sydney, for example, don't work in certain suburbs. In the UK, especially
London, one school can be a nightmare, whereas one just a few hundred metres away can be great.
Depends on the staff as well. Pick the area well if you are seriously considering going, and visit
the school before saying yes. If you consider contract supply work (replacement/substitute teaching)
be aware that is almost exclusively the domain of private agencies, who pay well but will send you
anywhere and everywhere - highest absentee rates are, understandably, in the schools which have the
greatest number of problems. And if you get sick, you don't get paid.

Having said that, I did supply work in London for one year (I am Australian no longer living in the
UK), got to know the schools - which ones to accept and which ones to avoid - pretty quickly and
managed to work 3 days a work (for the most part) earning enough to live in a share house in zone
two and still save enough to visit friends every month in France and take 2 o/s trips (to the
States, also to visit friends) every year. Plus the beer is cheap Mind you, it is about the only
thing that is, aside from .... Holiday packages and flights!

Good luck.
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Martin
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Report 17 years ago
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leanne waters <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]> Hello UK teachers, I'm a mature age student from Australia. I have approximately one year to[/q1]
go
[q1]> before I finish my degree. I am very interested in teaching in the UK.[/q1]
There
[q1]> are about five UK agencies that advertise for Australian teachers in our local newspaper. I have[/q1]
[q1]> several questions. Is there a shortage of[/q1]
qualified
[q1]> teachers in the UK.[/q1]

In some areas / subjects, yes.

[q1]> - and If so, why?[/q1]

Partly pay, as mentioned, and partly the poor press (much of it untrue, IMHO) suggesting that only
mugs would enter the teaching profession cos the kids are (allegedly) unmanageable, the conditions
and hours abyssmal. Poor teacher training in UK doesn't help either.

I suspect also that a decision taken in the 70s (or 80s?) to accept only graduates into teaching
hasn't helped. This precluded those in mid-career, with relevant experience but no degree and
unwilling to spend the time needed to graduate, from making a mid-career change into teaching. Over
the years, I've met folk make redundant from other sectors who (IMHO) could - and would like to -
become first class teachers, but for the degree requirement. Incidentally, this is now a fairly
meaningless stipulation now that degrees can be earned with Tesco stamps.

This hasn't answered your question - but don't let the bad stories you read about UK teachers'
conditions and experiences (esp in this NG!) put you off.

--
Martin

(remove barrier to reply)
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Bob Spowart
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martin wrote in message ...
[q1]>[/q1]
<SNIP>
[q1]>I suspect also that a decision taken in the 70s (or 80s?) to accept only graduates into teaching[/q1]
[q1]>hasn't helped. This precluded those in mid-career, with relevant experience but no degree and[/q1]
[q1]>unwilling to spend the time needed to graduate, from making a mid-career change into teaching. Over[/q1]
the
[q1]>years, I've met folk make redundant from other sectors who (IMHO) could - and would like to -[/q1]
[q1]>become first class teachers, but for the degree requirement. Incidentally, this is now a fairly[/q1]
[q1]>meaningless stipulation[/q1]
now
[q1]>that degrees can be earned with Tesco stamps.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
My thoughts entirely. Making teaching a wholly graduate entry profession has cut off a source of
experience that we are sorely in need of.
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