No offers for 2022 Vet Med

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Supportingmum
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#1
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#1
Hey. Apologies to gate crash this forum, but looking for some advice as a worried Mum. My daughter is due to sit her A Levels this year and was hoping to begin university to study Vet Med. However, despite being predicted A*A*A, achieving all of the work experience requirements and smashing two interviews (my opinion only) at Liverpool and Cambridge she has received no offers. I recognise that Vet Med is extremely competitive but this has been a huge blow after seeing her work so hard. I wondered if anyone else has had a similar experience and might be able to offer advice just now. She remains determined to apply again for next years entry but it would be great to hear of others experience. Many thanks.
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jxde1990
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#2
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#2
Hi, I was in the same position last year! I was predicted A*A*A, I had applied to vet med and had 3 interviews at Cambridge, Nottingham(these went okay I thought) and Liverpool(which went horribly). I had an offer for biochemistry at Bristol. I got no vet med offers, everyone at my school did and I did struggle to admit that to myself without feeling like such a failure.
For a while, undoubtedly due to FOMO, I was certain to take my offer for biochem. It was a good university and a course topic I new I would sort of enjoy at least although the career paths meant a lot more further study which was expensive but I live in a small town and all my friends were going away and none of them even considered for a moment a gap year.
I did a lot more work experience and research and realized that medicine was much more suited to me. Work experience is so important for this and I was pleased at myself for sorting it out and figuring out what I really wanted to study. I took the decision to take a gap year, take on a few jobs and keep looking for more work experience, for example I am working as a carer because I love how rewarding it is, the human bond and patient focus care and the skills it is teaching me for a (hopeful) career in medicine. Although I don’t really have anyone in my town anymore, and sometimes life is a bit mundane, I am getting through it. For example, I’m planning to live abroad in April to August hopefully, get out of here for a while 😜 which I wouldn’t have been able to do if I was at uni.
So my advice, I can tell vet med is what you want to do, spend the year working to earn some money, look for a few various sources on income such as a part time job at a café, then maybe some tutoring for GCSE/A-level students, some babysitting etc. I’ve found this variation has filled my time a bit more and made my life less boring than just being at one job all day everyday etc.and then maybe some volunteering if that’s your thing. It’s good on a personal statement and just good to develop communication skills and meet different types of people you maybe couldn’t if you were at school and just makes you feel good. Then work on your application, get some serious work experience that you can talk about in interview. You have the advantage of being able to shadow vets and other professionals whilst everyone is at school. If you can, maybe find some paid work which can count as work experience, add another activity you can do.
In terms of emotions and things like that, know your course is especially competitive. If people at school don’t understand etc and they’re getting offers left right and centre, be happy for them and everything, but know this is the hardest part. For me the trickiest thing was when teachers asked in front of people where everyone was going next year and I felt so ashamed to say no where because I got no offers that’s why I was so determined to take my 5th choice. But don’t. You sound like a great mum (my mum and dad have been amazing letting me stay here and helping me) and as long as she has a great support and reassurance a gap year to reapply can be a great thing! You have all that extra interview experience, achieved grades and you can feel a lot more like an adult doing a few jobs 😄 for now just focus on your A-levels so you can have great achieved grades so that’s one less worry! Good luck 😄
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ReadingMum
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Supportingmum)
Hey. Apologies to gate crash this forum, but looking for some advice as a worried Mum. My daughter is due to sit her A Levels this year and was hoping to begin university to study Vet Med. However, despite being predicted A*A*A, achieving all of the work experience requirements and smashing two interviews (my opinion only) at Liverpool and Cambridge she has received no offers. I recognise that Vet Med is extremely competitive but this has been a huge blow after seeing her work so hard. I wondered if anyone else has had a similar experience and might be able to offer advice just now. She remains determined to apply again for next years entry but it would be great to hear of others experience. Many thanks.
There are a number of people on here who got in at second or even third attempt. It is important that she doesn't compare herself to people aiming at other degrees - vet med is different. Many report that a gap year, whilst not the original plan, really helped in the end. There is time to get work experience whilst not juggling round mocks and exams and school holidays. She would also be applying with actual grades and not predictions. She could also earn a bit of money and/or do some travelling. Getting a customer facing job would really develop people skills which might help in interviews.
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Supportingmum
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#4
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#4
(Original post by jxde1990)
Hi, I was in the same position last year! I was predicted A*A*A, I had applied to vet med and had 3 interviews at Cambridge, Nottingham(these went okay I thought) and Liverpool(which went horribly). I had an offer for biochemistry at Bristol. I got no vet med offers, everyone at my school did and I did struggle to admit that to myself without feeling like such a failure.
For a while, undoubtedly due to FOMO, I was certain to take my offer for biochem. It was a good university and a course topic I new I would sort of enjoy at least although the career paths meant a lot more further study which was expensive but I live in a small town and all my friends were going away and none of them even considered for a moment a gap year.
I did a lot more work experience and research and realized that medicine was much more suited to me. Work experience is so important for this and I was pleased at myself for sorting it out and figuring out what I really wanted to study. I took the decision to take a gap year, take on a few jobs and keep looking for more work experience, for example I am working as a carer because I love how rewarding it is, the human bond and patient focus care and the skills it is teaching me for a (hopeful) career in medicine. Although I don’t really have anyone in my town anymore, and sometimes life is a bit mundane, I am getting through it. For example, I’m planning to live abroad in April to August hopefully, get out of here for a while 😜 which I wouldn’t have been able to do if I was at uni.
So my advice, I can tell vet med is what you want to do, spend the year working to earn some money, look for a few various sources on income such as a part time job at a café, then maybe some tutoring for GCSE/A-level students, some babysitting etc. I’ve found this variation has filled my time a bit more and made my life less boring than just being at one job all day everyday etc.and then maybe some volunteering if that’s your thing. It’s good on a personal statement and just good to develop communication skills and meet different types of people you maybe couldn’t if you were at school and just makes you feel good. Then work on your application, get some serious work experience that you can talk about in interview. You have the advantage of being able to shadow vets and other professionals whilst everyone is at school. If you can, maybe find some paid work which can count as work experience, add another activity you can do.
In terms of emotions and things like that, know your course is especially competitive. If people at school don’t understand etc and they’re getting offers left right and centre, be happy for them and everything, but know this is the hardest part. For me the trickiest thing was when teachers asked in front of people where everyone was going next year and I felt so ashamed to say no where because I got no offers that’s why I was so determined to take my 5th choice. But don’t. You sound like a great mum (my mum and dad have been amazing letting me stay here and helping me) and as long as she has a great support and reassurance a gap year to reapply can be a great thing! You have all that extra interview experience, achieved grades and you can feel a lot more like an adult doing a few jobs 😄 for now just focus on your A-levels so you can have great achieved grades so that’s one less worry! Good luck 😄
Thanks so much for taking the time to reply. Amazing to hear of your journey, your resilience and the positivity that has come from quite a difficult time. I will share this with my daughter and know it will be incredibly helpful for her. Wishing you lots of luck for your next adventure 😊
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Supportingmum
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#5
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#5
(Original post by ReadingMum)
There are a number of people on here who got in at second or even third attempt. It is important that she doesn't compare herself to people aiming at other degrees - vet med is different. Many report that a gap year, whilst not the original plan, really helped in the end. There is time to get work experience whilst not juggling round mocks and exams and school holidays. She would also be applying with actual grades and not predictions. She could also earn a bit of money and/or do some travelling. Getting a customer facing job would really develop people skills which might help in interviews.
Hi. Thanks so much for your reply. Really reassuring for her to hear that she is not alone and that actually, although it may seem difficult now, there are perhaps real advantages to taking a gap year and coming back stronger and wiser with another application.
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Scotney
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Supportingmum)
Hi. Thanks so much for your reply. Really reassuring for her to hear that she is not alone and that actually, although it may seem difficult now, there are perhaps real advantages to taking a gap year and coming back stronger and wiser with another application.
One of son's best friends got rejected from med school first time round and she too took a gap year fitting in volunteering at various jobs GP,care home,with shifts at Primark.She applied with grades in hand and got a place at Leicester.Knowing her quite well I think she was quite young for her age at 18 and quite reserved. That extra year plus experience was the best thing for her in terms of boosting her confidence and maturity.She just graduated as a doctor last summer.All to play for and if it is what she really wants it is worth it.
It is so difficult as these sort of courses are so demanding in the hurdles you need to jump to apply that it is doubly disappointing for applicant and supporting mums as they demand total investment in the cause
I will say however that a gap year might be a good chance to take a bit of a break between A levels and what is to come.My nephew is a vet and we used to joke that he had actually been sentenced to 5 years hard labour instead of vet school.He spent every holiday lambing or delivering cows or shovelling muck throughout uni.Son's degree at Oxford looked like a doddle in comparison.He is now a very handsome Vet M*** who all the ladies want to treat their cats!
I hope it all works out for her and keep us updated.
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RambleAmple
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#7
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#7
Hi, I also got rejected from all my choices the first time I applied for vet med. As others said, it is very different to applying to any other degree, grades as long as you meet the minimum don't really matter, most other applicants are all equally driven and so it's hard to get in. Different vet schools also look for completely different things in their students. I never intended on a gap year but I now call it a blessing in disguise, I missed most of the uni covid drama but I also had opportunity to do more work experience to help my application, more research, review etc and I feel I deserve my place a lot more now than the first time I applied - it's much better applying a second time round (especially if you already have grades since that takes some pressure off) as you know the unis a bit better and the application process and what they expect etc. I also think applying strategically is key - know strengths and weaknesses and their application processes, for example Bristol doesn't interview if that's a worry, or Liverpool don't have as many forms, some unis have more places for international rather than home etc etc. After I applied I also got a job which is great for savings but also character building - I was very shy before from the whole school pressure and bullying and I became very much an extrovert just from being away from that environment. Having a break is great too, as above vet school is very demanding in a lot of ways including working physically through your holidays, and so having a bit of a breather before you start is a good idea. I am now a first year at Liverpool and it was the only offer I got in that round, but you only need 1.
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Scotney
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#8
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#8
(Original post by RambleAmple)
Hi, I also got rejected from all my choices the first time I applied for vet med. As others said, it is very different to applying to any other degree, grades as long as you meet the minimum don't really matter, most other applicants are all equally driven and so it's hard to get in. Different vet schools also look for completely different things in their students. I never intended on a gap year but I now call it a blessing in disguise, I missed most of the uni covid drama but I also had opportunity to do more work experience to help my application, more research, review etc and I feel I deserve my place a lot more now than the first time I applied - it's much better applying a second time round (especially if you already have grades since that takes some pressure off) as you know the unis a bit better and the application process and what they expect etc. I also think applying strategically is key - know strengths and weaknesses and their application processes, for example Bristol doesn't interview if that's a worry, or Liverpool don't have as many forms, some unis have more places for international rather than home etc etc. After I applied I also got a job which is great for savings but also character building - I was very shy before from the whole school pressure and bullying and I became very much an extrovert just from being away from that environment. Having a break is great too, as above vet school is very demanding in a lot of ways including working physically through your holidays, and so having a bit of a breather before you start is a good idea. I am now a first year at Liverpool and it was the only offer I got in that round, but you only need 1.
Belated Congratulations on your place!
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username5637224
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#9
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#9
RambleAmple, Ptsai, aliaa03 (sorry to you girls for bringing you into this) are all gap year applicants, either because they didn't get offers or just missed the grades the first time round. But I'm sure they'll agree that they are better candidates for it. My own daughter just decided to avoid the stress of mixing year 13 with a vet med application and so applied last year in a gap year. I really don't regret her choice. It's amazing how much a gap year can change a candidate, and how much they gain in maturity.
Vet med as a degree and career is hard intellectually and emotionally. Being able to deal with failure is a necessary characteristic for a successful vet ( contradiction in terms!) so vet schools do not in most cases refuse the right to re-apply. But you've only given the outcome for 3 schools, is there a fourth in the pipeline? She only needs one offer!
And as the others have said, having been through the process once you are better prepared for the next round.
Everyone on here now knows that we applied from abroad with no help coming from outside of TSR. My daughter filled in her questionnaires to start off with with I'm the perfect student type answers, but the more we read on here, the more we realised that this is not what the vet schools are looking for, and luckily she was able to change her style before finishing all of her SJT's. They want to get to know the person, what makes him or her tick, how they address their weaknesses and how they learn from situations experienced.
If your daughter decides to try again and gets a place she will not be a rare species at any of the vet schools. The students come from all horizons and are of very varying ages, so one more year to get there is nothing.
Using a gap year wisely can make all the difference. Yes you can get more farm/practice/ equine experience etc but getting a job with people contact is also of great value. My daughter was "reserved", I wouldn't say introverted but certainly a little shy. Working part time in a supermarket at the check out and on the customer relations desk soon changed her, and as everyone knows most pets and animals have owners that vets have to deal with, so being confident when dealing with strangers is always an asset.
Reassure your daughter, she has not failed. She has just taken, like many others, a little detour before settling into her university studies. And looking at it from another point of view, it may well be the only time that she manages to have a year off. Once a vets career has begun and responsibilities stack up it'll be increasingly difficult to take a break of any length. This may be a blessing in disguise!
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_Rusty_
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Supportingmum)
Hey. Apologies to gate crash this forum, but looking for some advice as a worried Mum.
Not at all, anyone who wants help is more than welcome on TSR
My daughter is due to sit her A Levels this year and was hoping to begin university to study Vet Med. However, despite being predicted A*A*A, achieving all of the work experience requirements and smashing two interviews (my opinion only) at Liverpool and Cambridge she has received no offers.
I've just been rejected from Cambridge for medicine. It has no reflection on your daughters ability to study vet med but more of a reflection on the competition. She has done all of the right things. The best thing she can do is focus on her A Levels
I recognise that Vet Med is extremely competitive but this has been a huge blow after seeing her work so hard. I wondered if anyone else has had a similar experience and might be able to offer advice just now. She remains determined to apply again for next years entry but it would be great to hear of others experiences. Many thanks.
I can speak for Vet Med but I can speak for Medicine(which is in a very similar boat), I am in my gap year. I took it as an opportunity to gain more experience, confidence and money. Yes, it is a tough blow but your daughter is currently competing against others who are also on their gap years currently so the playing field is slightly skeewed anyway. Why doesn't your daughter come on here and speak to others, it undoubtedly boosted my confidence last year after 3 pre-int and 1 pos-int rejection
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Ptsai
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#11
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#11
Hi! I agree with what everyone has said - vet med is a super competitive course and many applicants like myself didn’t get any offers at all the first time round but this doesn’t mean you’re any less worthy of getting onto the course! In fact taking a year out and reapplying shows how much more dedicated you are and getting a place feels even more deserving as RambleAmple mentioned!
I also never planned on taking a gap year cos all my friends at school were set on going to uni however it was definitely a blessing in disguise as I know now I would not have been ready and confident enough to move out to uni. Like everyone else above I’ve started a part time job at a cafe which has really helped with communication skills and confidence around strangers which has been so helpful.

Please try not to worry too much about your daughter even though it’s hard to - I’m sure she is gonna make an amazing vet in the future and it doesn’t matter if she gets in this year, the next or the year after! In my opinion the application process might even be worse for parents as my mum has been non stop panicking even more than me hahaha

Where else is your daughter waiting to hear back from? It’s not all over yet, plus Nottingham April cohort usually go into clearing so she has another chance at interview 👍

My advice for her would be to focus on grades this year - with such amazing predicted grades, I’m sure this won’t be an issue at all!!! And with grades in the bag, the second time applying is way less stressful. And interview prep the following year is a lot easier after having a rough idea of what they’re gonna ask especially with Liverpool as most of us struggled with their interview questions (I definitely did the first time round!)

I hope this gives a bit of reassurance and I really hope everything goes well for you and your daughter!! Good luck and let us know any updates!! <333
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aliaa03
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Supportingmum)
Hey. Apologies to gate crash this forum, but looking for some advice as a worried Mum. My daughter is due to sit her A Levels this year and was hoping to begin university to study Vet Med. However, despite being predicted A*A*A, achieving all of the work experience requirements and smashing two interviews (my opinion only) at Liverpool and Cambridge she has received no offers. I recognise that Vet Med is extremely competitive but this has been a huge blow after seeing her work so hard. I wondered if anyone else has had a similar experience and might be able to offer advice just now. She remains determined to apply again for next years entry but it would be great to hear of others experience. Many thanks.
hi !! don't apologise at all, that's what we're all here for.

being predicted A*A*A is very impressive, and clearly shows she's very hardworking. I'm on a gap year and the time has flown by, and if I wasn't resitting my A levels I'd be having an even better time !! 😂 so if your daughter ends up taking a gap year, after getting the required grades this summer, then her gap year will be so much fun and a nice way to relax and take a breather after so many years of education, before going to vet school.

I never planned for this gap year obviously and a year ago if you asked if I wanted a gap year before vet school I would've been horrified because I was so excited to start and I didn't want to be left behind and one of the only people in my sixth form not going to university this year. Now in hindsight it's been great, and if I could go back, even if I DID get the right grades I'd still choose a gap year again.

Interviews are rarely a good insight into what a person's actually like. Some people get too stressed and mess up, some people have access to loads of practise with their school while some people may not get any actual practise at all. The things that make the great vets are things you can't see, compassion, kindness, being able to comfort an owner after putting down their cat, or determination to study when others are sleeping or partying, and to be able to push through all the hard moments in vet school. This isn't really something you can get across when there's a timer on the screen and you have 4 minutes to talk about an organ or whatever.

I'm sure your daughter possesses all the qualities needed to be a vet, so don't take the rejections personally. It can be down to the luck of which interviewer you get on the day, what questions you have, if you're feeling too nervous, etc. I'm so glad your daughter is reapplying next year, I'm absolutely sure she'll receive lots of offers !!!

achieving all the work experience requirements is a good thing but obviously doesn't guarantee an offer or give you a higher chance above someone else if you've both done the required amount. Vet school interviews were terrifying last year for me, as I had no idea really what to expect. I'd done some mock interviews with my school, and got asked the generic questions like "why do you want to be a vet" or "what are the challenges of vet med", and those were easy enough to answer, but the actual interviews were quite different, not to mention I was feeling sick with nerves.

Now that she's had those 2 interviews she has more experience with how they work. Research each vet school and their style of interviews, e.g. RVC and Surrey are MMI, whereas Liverpool and Nottingham are panel with 2 interviewers. Make sure to keep up to date with ethics/ things in the news, practise roleplaying, e.g. breaking bad news, talking to a frustrating owner, etc. Think about the skills that a vet needs and how your daughter saw those during work experience, and really try to reflect on the experience, e.g. what happened in the situation, how did you feel, what did the vet do/ person working with the animals, how was that skill important as a vet, how do you demonstrate that skill, etc. Also make sure to read the RCVS Day One Competences and try refer to these when you think they're applicable in the interview. The biggest thing is to just stay calm !!! you can do all the interview prep in the world but it'll fly straight out the window if you keep overthinking it. It's not an "interview", think of it as a conversation with you and the interviewer, who is a normal person just like you.

where else did she apply this year? has she considered applying to Bristol? there's no interview required, offer making is just based on a questionnaire.
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coconuter
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Supportingmum)
Hey. Apologies to gate crash this forum, but looking for some advice as a worried Mum. My daughter is due to sit her A Levels this year and was hoping to begin university to study Vet Med. However, despite being predicted A*A*A, achieving all of the work experience requirements and smashing two interviews (my opinion only) at Liverpool and Cambridge she has received no offers. I recognise that Vet Med is extremely competitive but this has been a huge blow after seeing her work so hard. I wondered if anyone else has had a similar experience and might be able to offer advice just now. She remains determined to apply again for next years entry but it would be great to hear of others experience. Many thanks.
Hey there! I just got into Cambridge to study HSPS (a pretty competitive course, I think it's something like 17% chance of getting in, as low as 8% depending on the college). This was my third year applying. Yes, you got that right, third. I took two gap years. I applied to study English in year 13 to a college, for HSPS in my first gap year at another college, and this year (my second gap year) I applied again for HSPS at yet a different college. I would say importantly with Cambridge specifically the college matters - they judge people on slightly different things, they have different numbers of applicants to places, the DoS needs to think 'yes I can teach this person for 3 years and get on with them' and so on. Many different variables, so if she wants to try again, definitely look more closely at the college. In fact what I did last summer was I wrote to every single college that wasn't a mature college and asked how they would consider my application, as not only was I a little older, but I wanted to see their responses. Of course many of them were similar, but you were able to see which colleges seemed to care more about potential applicants. Now I wouldn't recommend emailing as many as I did because she's only applied once so far, but make a shortlist and email them. A college that cares more may present their applicant in a better way to the pool, even subconsciously.
Next piece of advice - if she wants to go for it again, she should. It's that simple. If she doesn't, she may regret it, and we only have one life. If that's her decision, then that's her decision. I am SO glad I decided to apply again, and again, and not give up, because now I am going to my dream university in the autumn and I didn't let myself give up. I learnt so much in my gap years, academically and through more life experience. I think going to uni as a slightly older and more mature student will mean I'll get more out of the experience too.
If she does apply again next year I'd give this advice. Keep academic. She should do online courses to keep her academic skills, such as critical thinking and essay writing, from getting rusty. It also shows the universities that she is not using her gap year to lounge around, but instead using it to further her intellectual skills. It shows them that she enjoys learning, wants to learn, is able to self motivate, has a passion and curiosity for the subject, and so on. Last year I actually took another A level, bumping up my A level grades another A*, making my position more competitive.
I also read. A lot. Listened to podcasts, read articles (both from academic journals and newspapers), watched documentaries, the lot. Start with, I would say, the university of Cambridge reading list for vetmed for ideas for books and other things. I don't know if there is one, I'm going off my knowledge of HSPS, but if there is then start there. Listening to podcasts, especially academic ones, is so so SO useful. The understanding and ability to speak fluently using more academic vocabulary will work a little like osmosis. It also gives her an amazing foundation to draw from when writing a personal statement and speaking in her interview.
In my first year of applying to uni I got rejected by 3!! universities. Durham, Edinburgh, and Cambridge. Last year I was rejected by Cambridge and Durham again. CLEARLY these rejections didn't represent my abilities or my intelligence as I am now going to go to Cambridge. Make sure she knows that as if she decides to go again it's likely that those rejections will hang over her a little bit. They definitely did for me. It was really hard to work while I still felt the effects of those rejections. She'll need you, I know I needed my mum.
If she makes effective and tangible plans - such as work experience (i didn't get to do this because of covid even tho i did plan for it, but likely for vetmed this would be really useful, probably more so than for HSPS) and is able to talk about them in her personal statement and then at interview, it gives her a better shot.
For interviews specifically at Cambridge: she has to be teachable. Number one thing. It is more important to be teachable and to think aloud than it is to know loads of stuff. Knowing loads of stuff helps, it helps a lot, but what they're doing, sort of, is simulating a tutorial environment. They'll push her to the limit of what she knows, and then push her a bit further to see how she thinks and if they can teach her. Thinking out loud? Can't underestimate it. She could get an answer wrong to a question, but if she's shown her thought process they'll not only know how to guide her, but they'll see how close she was to getting it, and if she wasn't they'll be able to see the logical steps she takes to get to that conclusion. Confidence is key. Having lots of conversations with her similar to an interview, so she can get used to thinking out loud and the types of questions she'll be asked, is really useful. It means that even if a hard question is asked she'll be able to come up with a solution. The question won't totally stump her - I found that even if I had a difficult question, yes it was hard, but I could think it through out loud. If she finds that she actually changes her mind while thinking through the question out loud she should voice that! I realised I'd said World War 1 instead of World War 2 in my interview this year! I went back, explained that I'd said something wrong and explained where in my thought process meant the mix up had occurred and why World War 1 was on my mind. I also went back and changed an answer half way through, realising there was a counterpoint to my argument I hadn't explored which made the question more complex than I had originally shown in my answer.
I didn't get in the first time around, didn't even get in the second time around. But I learnt so much. And I think I'll enjoy university more at 20 than if I had gone at 18.
Wish her good luck from me. I hope at least some of what I've said might be useful! x
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ReadingMum
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#14
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#14
coconuter That is a brilliant personal piece of advice. Well done on getting where you wanted to be.
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coconuter
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#15
Report 3 months ago
#15
(Original post by ReadingMum)
coconuter That is a brilliant personal piece of advice. Well done on getting where you wanted to be.
thank you! I just hope some of it was helpful - message me if you have any questions! x
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00Pound
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#16
Report 3 months ago
#16
(Original post by Supportingmum)
Hey. Apologies to gate crash this forum, but looking for some advice as a worried Mum. My daughter is due to sit her A Levels this year and was hoping to begin university to study Vet Med. However, despite being predicted A*A*A, achieving all of the work experience requirements and smashing two interviews (my opinion only) at Liverpool and Cambridge she has received no offers. I recognise that Vet Med is extremely competitive but this has been a huge blow after seeing her work so hard. I wondered if anyone else has had a similar experience and might be able to offer advice just now. She remains determined to apply again for next years entry but it would be great to hear of others experience. Many thanks.
Hi, this is a tough one and so disheartening when you've put your all into it. Same position here with rejections from Liverpool and Cambridge and waiting to hear from Edinburgh and Bristol. Has she heard from her other two options?
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Scotney
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#17
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#17
(Original post by 00Pound)
Hi, this is a tough one and so disheartening when you've put your all into it. Same position here with rejections from Liverpool and Cambridge and waiting to hear from Edinburgh and Bristol. Has she heard from her other two options?
OP has not responded as yet but there are lots of good replies on this thread. Fingers crossed for other 2.She only needs one so hold on Mum but yes its difficult.
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Supportingmum
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#18
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#18
(Original post by 00Pound)
Hi, this is a tough one and so disheartening when you've put your all into it. Same position here with rejections from Liverpool and Cambridge and waiting to hear from Edinburgh and Bristol. Has she heard from her other two options?
Hi. Thanks so much for your reply. Sounds like you are having a tricky time too. She also applied for Nottingham and Surrey but had no offer from them either, not even an interview. How are you getting on?
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_emily_13
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#19
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#19
I have been rejected from all 4 does anyone have any advice for clearing?
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_Rusty_
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#20
Report 3 months ago
#20
(Original post by _emily_13)
I have been rejected from all 4 does anyone have any advice for clearing?
I know you're not for Vet Med but ecolier might have some advice. Thanks
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