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Is everything that contains carbon a carbonate

Hi, I'm a GCSE student and currently trying to revise the "Evolution of the Atmosphere" topic. I came across this word and wondered if it just meant things that contained carbon were carbonates? Apologies if I am wrong, please can someone explain this to me or any other pieces of information helpful that will help me learn this topic. Thanks!
(edited 2 years ago)
Only compounds with CO3 2- are carbonates.
Reply 2
A Carbonate ion has formula CO32−.

"A carbonate" is any ionic compound with a carbonate ion.

E.g. Na2CO3 is sodium carbonate
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 3
Original post by ElMoro
A Carbonate ion has formula CO32−.

"A carbonate" is any salt with a carbonate ion.

E.g. sodium carbonate has formula Na2CO3

Oooh, so anything that contains a salt and a carbonate ion is a carbonate?
Reply 4
Original post by hungrysalamander
Only compounds with CO3 2- are carbonates.

So anything with a carbonate ion (CO3(2-)) is a carbonate?
Reply 5
Original post by Milo MS
Oooh, so anything that contains a salt and a carbonate ion is a carbonate?

In chemistry, "salt" essentially means "ionic compound".

So any ionic compound with a carbonate ion is "a carbonate".
Reply 6
Original post by ElMoro
In chemistry, "salt" essentially means "ionic compound".

So any ionic compound with a carbonate ion is "a carbonate".

Gotcha, thank you very much.
Original post by Milo MS
Hi, I'm a GCSE student and currently trying to revise the "Evolution of the Atmosphere" topic. I came across this word and wondered if it just meant things that contained carbon were carbonates? Apologies if I am wrong, please can someone explain this to me or any other pieces of information helpful that will help me learn this topic. Thanks!


No, not all molecules and substances with carbon atoms in are carbonates automatically. And there are almost chemical substances and molecules with at least one carbon in,

Original post by hungrysalamander
Only compounds with CO3 2- are carbonates.

Puts it in a nutshell!

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