Summarise theoretical perspectives on reflection in relation to professional developm

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tiegan_b
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Hi, as part of my early years educator course I have been asked to research theoretical perspectives on reflection in relation to professional development and to share my findings within an online forum. I hope you enjoy my findings and welcome your views or any research you wish to share.
A theorist that had an impact on reflection and reflection processes is David Kolb. Kolb developed an experiential learning cycle theory that involved four processes that were required to take place for effective learning to occur. Kolb believed that for development to happen, new experiences would have to be experienced.
Kolb’s theory consisted of a four staged learning cycle. Concrete experience is the first stage and essentially is where something has been done or an experience has been had. To understand this you must immerse yourself in the experience and understand what happened.
The second stage within the learning cycle is a reflective observation where you reflect on the experience and consider what went well and what didn’t go well. Reflection can occur in many different ways. Self-reflection is a common way to reflect but can also involve receiving feedback from others. The third stage is abstract conceptualization where you consider how things can be changed through the learning experience and reflection that has been made. These conclusions will have been made within the reflective observation stage prior to stage three.
Stage four is called active experiment and is where you try out your ideas of how to improve practice and experiment with these new methods that have been thought of during the abstract conceptualisation stage.
Another theorist that researched and studied into reflection and reflective practice is Gibbs. Gibbs produced a 6 step cycle developed from David Kolb’s 4 stage experiential learning. This 6 step cycle of reflection relates to learning through repetition, with each step informing the next.
The first of the 6 steps are ‘Description’ where you determine what has happened. Next is ‘Feelings’ which a step that encourages you to understand and think about how you felt during the experience or situation and the impact of these feelings. The third stage is the ‘Evaluation’ stage where you evaluate what has happened to determine what went well and what could have gone better. Once this has been done, stage four is an ‘Analysis’ stage where you essentially make sense of the situation to understand why these things did not go well or why they in fact did go well.
The fifth stage of Gibb’s reflection cycle is ‘Conclusion’ where one would consider and think about what has been learnt during this situation or experience and how things could be done differently overall next time. Once a conclusion has been drawn, the last step is an ‘Action Plan’ where plans are put in place to allow changes to be made and actioned in order to improve practice.
Both of these cycles show the importance of reflection from learning experiences. With regards to personal development, by using these reflection cycles, it allows you as an individual to evaluate your performance and areas of strengths and weaknesses. This is an important aspect of professional development as it allows you to take responsibility and ownership for your actions and role within your job as an early years practitioner. Gibb’s fifth and sixth area of the reflection cycle I particularly find useful and beneficial to use within my reflective practice as it truly allows and encourages you to fully evaluate your actions and the results of these. Being aware of your strengths and weakness and areas where improvement may be necessary is essential when considering how successful reflective practice is. To be able to then construct an action plan based upon these conclusions will allow for an all round better working attitude and performance which improves professional development.
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sarlambo
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(Original post by tiegan_b)
Hi, as part of my early years educator course I have been asked to research theoretical perspectives on reflection in relation to professional development and to share my findings within an online forum. I hope you enjoy my findings and welcome your views or any research you wish to share.
A theorist that had an impact on reflection and reflection processes is David Kolb. Kolb developed an experiential learning cycle theory that involved four processes that were required to take place for effective learning to occur. Kolb believed that for development to happen, new experiences would have to be experienced.
Kolb’s theory consisted of a four staged learning cycle. Concrete experience is the first stage and essentially is where something has been done or an experience has been had. To understand this you must immerse yourself in the experience and understand what happened.
The second stage within the learning cycle is a reflective observation where you reflect on the experience and consider what went well and what didn’t go well. Reflection can occur in many different ways. Self-reflection is a common way to reflect but can also involve receiving feedback from others. The third stage is abstract conceptualization where you consider how things can be changed through the learning experience and reflection that has been made. These conclusions will have been made within the reflective observation stage prior to stage three.
Stage four is called active experiment and is where you try out your ideas of how to improve practice and experiment with these new methods that have been thought of during the abstract conceptualisation stage.
Another theorist that researched and studied into reflection and reflective practice is Gibbs. Gibbs produced a 6 step cycle developed from David Kolb’s 4 stage experiential learning. This 6 step cycle of reflection relates to learning through repetition, with each step informing the next.
The first of the 6 steps are ‘Description’ where you determine what has happened. Next is ‘Feelings’ which a step that encourages you to understand and think about how you felt during the experience or situation and the impact of these feelings. The third stage is the ‘Evaluation’ stage where you evaluate what has happened to determine what went well and what could have gone better. Once this has been done, stage four is an ‘Analysis’ stage where you essentially make sense of the situation to understand why these things did not go well or why they in fact did go well.
The fifth stage of Gibb’s reflection cycle is ‘Conclusion’ where one would consider and think about what has been learnt during this situation or experience and how things could be done differently overall next time. Once a conclusion has been drawn, the last step is an ‘Action Plan’ where plans are put in place to allow changes to be made and actioned in order to improve practice.
Both of these cycles show the importance of reflection from learning experiences. With regards to personal development, by using these reflection cycles, it allows you as an individual to evaluate your performance and areas of strengths and weaknesses. This is an important aspect of professional development as it allows you to take responsibility and ownership for your actions and role within your job as an early years practitioner. Gibb’s fifth and sixth area of the reflection cycle I particularly find useful and beneficial to use within my reflective practice as it truly allows and encourages you to fully evaluate your actions and the results of these. Being aware of your strengths and weakness and areas where improvement may be necessary is essential when considering how successful reflective practice is. To be able to then construct an action plan based upon these conclusions will allow for an all round better working attitude and performance which improves professional development.
Thank you for sharing Tiegan, theorists is an area I struggle with, I just see the word and mentally switch off. This has helped me immensely.
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tiegan_b
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(Original post by sarlambo)
Thank you for sharing Tiegan, theorists is an area I struggle with, I just see the word and mentally switch off. This has helped me immensely.
Thank you for your response. I am pleased my learning has helped you too. There is so much information and knowledge shared by theorists that I too find grasping my understanding of which theorists work in connection with others and how information from one theorist can benefit the knowledge and work presented by another. I particularly enjoyed learning about Gibb's theory. Do you have a theorist that you particularly enjoyed learning about on reflection in relation to professional development? It would be interesting to hear your views!
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Georgief08
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(Original post by tiegan_b)
Hi, as part of my early years educator course I have been asked to research theoretical perspectives on reflection in relation to professional development and to share my findings within an online forum. I hope you enjoy my findings and welcome your views or any research you wish to share.
A theorist that had an impact on reflection and reflection processes is David Kolb. Kolb developed an experiential learning cycle theory that involved four processes that were required to take place for effective learning to occur. Kolb believed that for development to happen, new experiences would have to be experienced.
Kolb’s theory consisted of a four staged learning cycle. Concrete experience is the first stage and essentially is where something has been done or an experience has been had. To understand this you must immerse yourself in the experience and understand what happened.
The second stage within the learning cycle is a reflective observation where you reflect on the experience and consider what went well and what didn’t go well. Reflection can occur in many different ways. Self-reflection is a common way to reflect but can also involve receiving feedback from others. The third stage is abstract conceptualization where you consider how things can be changed through the learning experience and reflection that has been made. These conclusions will have been made within the reflective observation stage prior to stage three.
Stage four is called active experiment and is where you try out your ideas of how to improve practice and experiment with these new methods that have been thought of during the abstract conceptualisation stage.
Another theorist that researched and studied into reflection and reflective practice is Gibbs. Gibbs produced a 6 step cycle developed from David Kolb’s 4 stage experiential learning. This 6 step cycle of reflection relates to learning through repetition, with each step informing the next.
The first of the 6 steps are ‘Description’ where you determine what has happened. Next is ‘Feelings’ which a step that encourages you to understand and think about how you felt during the experience or situation and the impact of these feelings. The third stage is the ‘Evaluation’ stage where you evaluate what has happened to determine what went well and what could have gone better. Once this has been done, stage four is an ‘Analysis’ stage where you essentially make sense of the situation to understand why these things did not go well or why they in fact did go well.
The fifth stage of Gibb’s reflection cycle is ‘Conclusion’ where one would consider and think about what has been learnt during this situation or experience and how things could be done differently overall next time. Once a conclusion has been drawn, the last step is an ‘Action Plan’ where plans are put in place to allow changes to be made and actioned in order to improve practice.
Both of these cycles show the importance of reflection from learning experiences. With regards to personal development, by using these reflection cycles, it allows you as an individual to evaluate your performance and areas of strengths and weaknesses. This is an important aspect of professional development as it allows you to take responsibility and ownership for your actions and role within your job as an early years practitioner. Gibb’s fifth and sixth area of the reflection cycle I particularly find useful and beneficial to use within my reflective practice as it truly allows and encourages you to fully evaluate your actions and the results of these. Being aware of your strengths and weakness and areas where improvement may be necessary is essential when considering how successful reflective practice is. To be able to then construct an action plan based upon these conclusions will allow for an all round better working attitude and performance which improves professional development.
Thank you for the fantastic information and for sharing. I am also currently studying for my Level 3 qualification so found it interesting to read your research and summaries on the theorists David Kolb and Gibbs. Within my own research I found that David Kolb was influenced by other theorists such as John Dewey and Jean Piaget. I find this interesting when considering how each theorists work supports or assists another’s, and the benefit of knowledge we gain from this when theorists share their findings and discoveries. Super interesting!
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