How to get into Westminster School 16+ (AMA)

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student_anon13
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About:

This is a small post for future generations planning to apply for Westminster School for sixth form (16+ entrance exam). I'm writing this because when I applied it was difficult to find the correct information and it was often quite scattered. BTW this is mostly centred around STEM subjects. Here is a thread for people applying for classics at Westminster where you can discuss things and find help: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=7219969

Context:

At the time of writing, I'm currently in year 11 and have finished all my sixth form (16+) entrance exams and interviews. I got offers from a number of schools including St Paul's School and Westminster School. In the end, I took the offer from St Paul's and rejected my offer from Westminster as they don't offer scholarships to boys at 16+ and don't give bursaries out to people living out of the M25 area and thus I simply could not afford the fees without my family going bankrupt . If I did have the money, I probably would have chosen Westminster since St Pauls is an all-boys school xd. Though, I'd definitely say St Pauls is superior in terms of STEM by a fair amount . You should take many things into consideration when choosing whose offer you'd accept.

In terms of revision, I did none. I had mocks and math olympiads at the time and I didn't really understand how I was meant to revise for something like this, and frankly, I couldn't really be bothered considering I thought the difficulty was very very hard (it's easier than people think ig, especially for girls for a number of reasons including the fact that there are a lot more spaces) and even if I did get an offer I knew I wouldn't go . I'll talk more about preparation later...

I applied for Maths, Further Maths, Physics, and Economics which is apparently one of the most common choices of subjects, if not the most.


Disclaimer:
The process changed the year I sat it (2021 applying for entry in 2022) so I wouldn't be surprised if they change it again. Also, make sure to note that I do not attend Westminster School and I never have and so don't ask me questions that only a current student would know.

Process:

First I'll talk about the exams. I had five papers: the personal statement, the maths paper, the further maths paper, and the economics paper. There were between 800 and 1000 people in the exam hall. The line was massive and it took ages to get in.

The personal statement had four questions. I can't remember the questions exactly but they went along the lines of:

1) Why do you want to study at Westminster?
2) What extracurriculars do you do and what can you do for the school?
3) What do you think is a problem that society will face?
4) Write a tweet about your day to day life (or something like how people would describe you).

The first two questions are obviously standard and thus relatively straightforward to answer. When asked "Why Westminster?" don't reply with generic information like "It is very academic" because a) they already know and have heard that many times and b) there are many other schools which are very academic. Tell them something specific about the school that applies to you. For example, talk about a certain club/society they have that interests you. Talk about why you want to move in the first place and think of a genuinely good reason (even if there isn't one). For inspiration, the reason I applied to all these top schools is because my school is in the bottom 3% and I knew that I could propel myself forward if I had the chance to go to a school like Westminster. Obviously your circumstances might be different. Try to get extracurriculars and remember to talk about how they have helped you and what your plan for the future is with them.

The next two questions were interesting and were obviously trying to get an insight into your personality. Question three is pretty unpreparable unless you generally have a good general knowledge about things. Don't talk about something generic like "climate change" because you can not get more boring than that. Try to be creative and show off your intelligence. I wrote about the "Universe 25" experiment and overpopulation which I feel like basically no one would have written about which probably made me stand out. There are aprox 1000 people, why are you special? Question four wanted to know about what you do in day to day life. I kept it simple and just talked about what stuff I like doing in terms of academics and sport. I talked about the books I read and what I like to do when I'm not studying such as playing badminton.

The maths paper had 50 questions and were all multiple choice non-calc. It was based off the gcse syllabus and had problem solving mixed it. I'm pretty sure I got 49/50 as I accidentally rubbed out Q50 right at the end and ran out of time when I was trying to change Q49 (because I thought I had put the wrong answer down for Q49). I think generally doing UKMT stuff will suffice. As I said, I didn't prepare at all but I do a lot of math anyway. After speaking to others, there were a few who had also answered all the questions but a lot had run out of time.

The further maths paper had 8 questions which were a lot longer and tedious and it was non-calc. I answered all the questions and I'm pretty sure I got them all correct. After talking to other people, I realised that others had found it very difficult and couldn't answer many of them. These questions only required GCSE knowledge. It was a lot more problem solving though. I guess doing olympiads would help a lot. Side note: I think this was the first year they had a separate paper for further maths.

I found the physics paper quite difficult. It was like a gcse paper but it was also problem solving. There were multiple choice questions at the start and then long answer questions later. I'm not really good at physics but I was relieved to hear that others found it difficult. Apparently the chemistry paper was insanely difficult according to like everyone I spoke to. My advice would be to prepare for sciences a lot and do stuff like the intermediate physics challenge.

The economics paper started with some short answer questions. They didn't expect any knowledge but I had read an economics text book in year 9 before and it helped me. The first question told you about a concept known as "opportunity cost" and you had to apply it to some scenarios. There was also some graph interpreting questions. The short answer questions just required careful thinking. There was a long essay question on Covid Passports. It was basically asking you to analyse the effects of the introduction of Covid Passports. I think knowing about current affairs would have helped. If you study geography, you are at an advantage.

Now I'll take about the interviews. I think about 140 girls were invited for the interviews and about 20 boys but I'm not entirely sure. I had four interviews: a general interview, a maths interview, a physics interview, and an economics interview.

The general interview was asking questions trying to further understand me and my personality. One thing they asked me what books I had currently been reading. I immediately answered with a maths books and an economics book and I continued to talk about things I had learnt from them and how it was useful. You want to come off as academic and interested and passionate. They asked my why I wanted to move in the first place. They also asked me if I would accept their offer if they gave it to me which I thought was extremely strange. I said yes but I knew that I wasn't going to.

The physics interview was strange because my interviewer asked me what was my favourite topic and then asked me questions based on it. I said electricity was my favourite and the questions he asked me where quite basic. He just tested knowledge of series and parallel circuits as well as formulae etc. He also asked me about an experiment in class that I had done recently and what the independent, dependant, and control variables were. I was expecting it be way more difficult. He didn't ask questions like why I wanted to study physics but he did ask me what I wanted to be when I was older.

The economics interview was quite fun actually. He asked me why I wanted to study economics in the first place and I told him about the problem of 'infinite wants but finite resources' which he seemed impressed by. Remember to sound passionate. He also asked me some general economics question testing stuff like why we have prices on things. It's hard to explain but he asked questions on simple concepts in a confusing and more fundamental way. Then he asked me a game theory question based on the show 'Golden Balls' and it was quite simple if you worked out average winnings.

In the maths interviews, I thought they would give me questions on Q50 of the maths test which I got wrong. I was correct. I answered 4 or 5 questions (which I'm pretty sure is more than expected for someone who gets an offer) and then got onto this longer one where I made a lot of progress but ran out of time. From what other people have said, getting 3 questions is great. I asked one of the other boys who were at the interviews and I think he said he got 4 questions done. The maths interviewer didn't ask me any questions like why I wanted to study maths, it was just me solving the questions he gave me. I'd definitely try to do the questions as quick as you can - as I didn't expect their interviews to be so short and rubbish - and thus you can show off more.

Conclusion:

I went in thinking that it would be a lot harder than it was considering there would be a ton of kids from the top schools in the country, and a lot of international students. It was daunting, however, it turned out fine.

- Remember to revise (don't be like me).
- Always be interesting and unique and different in essentially all aspects.
- Try have good general knowledge
- Be passionate and ambitious
- Have extracurriculars like sport
- Read books (honestly I read few but still managed to famoose them)

Hopefully this is useful. Let me know if you have any questions. I also applied to a lot of other schools including:

- St Paul's school
- Brighton College
- Marlborough College
- Millfield School
- Harrow School

Let me know if you want posts on them or any advice and if people who have been through the process of applying to top schools could write advice and their experience in this thread then that would be great.

Useful links:

Here is the old Westminster School thread for entrance in 2022:
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6804410
Here is the old Westminster School thread for entrance in 2021:
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6503450
Here is a Westminster 2023 16+ entrance for classics thread:
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=7219969
Some info about extra+super curriculars from my view:
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...=#post97225498
Westminster School website:
- https://www.westminster.org.uk/
Useful Youtube videos on getting into Westminster:
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtmWYjTDKRs
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTXelMICWXY
Westminster School Youtube Channel:
- https://www.youtube.com/user/WestminsterSchoolUK

Some info for SPGS:
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...2#post97156874
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...=#post97205462

Some info for SPS:
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...=#post97133472

My goal with this post and giving out advice is to make it easier for students so please if people have advice and useful information then write a post under this thread.

Ask me anything and good luck.

P.S. You can contact me directly by adding me on ig @prince0.k, just send a message and lmk what I can help you with.

(Like the post for extra good luck and because I spent ages writing it )
Last edited by student_anon13; 3 weeks ago
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Chloeddw
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Thank you for this! I'm in year 10 and this helps a lot. May I ask what you were getting in the maths challenges? Just to know how far I am from the level you need to get in
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Chloeddw
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Also, how hard are the further maths questions compared to maths challenges?
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student_anon13
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(Original post by Chloeddw)
Thank you for this! I'm in year 10 and this helps a lot. May I ask what you were getting in the maths challenges? Just to know how far I am from the level you need to get in
I can usually get a near perfect score in IMC and SMC. I doubt you would need that to get in.
Last edited by student_anon13; 2 months ago
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student_anon13
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(Original post by Chloeddw)
Also, how hard are the further maths questions compared to maths challenges?
It's hard to compare them since the maths challenges are multiple choice whereas the further maths paper was long answer questions. I'd say the further maths paper is more comparable to like the Maclaurin olympiad but it's def easier than the olympiad in terms of problem solving.
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Okay, thank you
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itsbhere
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(Original post by Chloeddw)
Thank you for this! I'm in year 10 and this helps a lot. May I ask what you were getting in the maths challenges? Just to know how far I am from the level you need to get in
heyy are you applying for 2023-2024?
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itsbhere
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(Original post by student_anon13)
About:

This is a small post for future generations planning to apply for Westminster School for sixth form (16+ entrance exam). I'm writing this because when I applied it was difficult to find the correct information and it was often quite scattered.

Context:

At the time of writing, I'm currently in year 11 and have finished all my sixth form (16+) entrance exams and interviews. I got offers from a number of schools including St Paul's School and Westminster School. In the end, I took the offer from St Paul's and rejected my offer from Westminster as they don't offer scholarships to boys at 16+ and don't give bursaries out to people living out of the M25 area.

In terms of revision, I did none. I had mocks and math olympiads at the time and I didn't really understand how I was meant to revise for something like this. I'll talk more about preparation later...

I applied for Maths, Further Maths, Physics, and Economics which is apparently one of the most common choices of subjects, if not the most.


Disclaimer:
The process changed the year I sat it (2021) so I wouldn't be surprised if they change it again.

Process:

First I'll talk about the exams. I had five papers: the personal statement, the maths paper, the further maths paper, and the economics paper. There were between 800 and 1000 people in the exam hall. The line was massive and took ages to get in.

The personal statement had four questions. I can't remember the questions exactly but they went along the lines of:

1) Why do you want to study at Westminster?
2) What extracurriculars do you do and what can you do for the school?
3) What do you think is a problem that society will face?
4) Write a tweet about your day to day life (or something like how people would describe you).

The first two questions are obviously standard and thus relatively straightforward to answer. When asked "Why Westminster?" don't reply with generic information like "It is very academic" because a) they already know and have heard that many times and b) there are many other schools which are very academic. Tell them something specific about the school that applies to you. For example, talk about a certain club/society they have that interests you. Talk about why you want to move in the first place and think of a genuinely good reason (even if there isn't one). For inspiration, the reason I applied to all these top schools is because my school is in the bottom 3% and I knew that I could propel myself forward if I had the chance to go to a school like Westminster. Obviously your circumstances might be different. Try to get extracurriculars and remember to talk about how they have helped you and what your plan for the future is with them.

The next two questions were interesting and were obviously trying to get an insight into your personality. Question three is pretty unpreparable unless you generally have a good general knowledge about things. Don't talk about something generic like "climate change" because you can not get more boring than that. Try to be creative and show off your intelligence. I wrote about the "Universe 25" experiment and overpopulation which I feel like basically no one would have written about which probably made me stand out. There are aprox 1000 people, why are you special? Question four wanted to know about what you do in day to day life. I kept it simple and just talked about what stuff I like doing in terms of academics and sport. I talked about the books I read and what I like to do when I'm not studying such as playing badminton.

The maths paper had 50 questions and were all multiple choice non-calc. It was based off the gcse syllabus and had problem solving mixed it. I'm pretty sure I got 49/50 as I accidentally rubbed out Q50 right at the end and ran out of time when I was trying to change Q49 (because I thought I had put the wrong answer down for Q49). I think generally doing UKMT stuff will suffice. As I said, I didn't prepare at all but I do a lot of math anyway. After speaking to others, there were a few who had also answered all the questions but a lot had run out of time.

The further maths paper had 8 questions which were a lot longer and tedious and it was non-calc. I answered all the questions and I'm pretty sure I got them all correct. After talking to other people, I realised that others had found it very difficult and couldn't answer many of them. These questions only required GCSE knowledge. It was a lot more problem solving though. I guess doing olympiads would help a lot. Side note: I think this was the first year they had a separate paper for further maths.

I found the physics paper quite difficult. It was like a gcse paper but it was also problem solving. There were multiple choice questions at the start and then long answer questions later. I'm not really good at physics but I was relieved to hear that others found it difficult. Apparently the chemistry paper was insanely difficult according to like everyone I spoke to. My advice would be to prepare for sciences a lot and do stuff like the intermediate physics challenge.

The economics paper started with some short answer questions. They didn't expect any knowledge but I had read an economics text book in year 9 before and it helped me. The first question told you about a concept known as "opportunity cost" and you had to apply it to some scenarios. There was also some graph interpreting questions. The short answer questions just required careful thinking. There was a long essay question on Covid Passports. It was basically asking you to analyse the effects of the introduction of Covid Passports. I think knowing about current affairs would have helped. If you study geography, you are at an advantage.

Now I'll take about the interviews. I think about 140 girls were invited for the interviews and about 20 boys but I'm not entirely sure. I had four interviews: a general interview, a maths interview, a physics interview, and an economics interview.

The general interview was asking questions trying to further understand me and my personality. One thing they asked me what books I had currently been reading. I immediately answered with a maths books and an economics book and I continued to talk about things I had learnt from them and how it was useful. You want to come off as academic and interested and passionate. They asked my why I wanted to move in the first place. They also asked me if I would accept their offer if they gave it to me which I thought was extremely strange. I said yes but I knew that I wasn't going to.

The physics interview as strange because my interviewer asked me what was my favourite topic and then asked me questions based on it. I said electricity was my favourite and the questions he asked me where quite basic. He just tested knowledge of series and parallel circuits as well as formulae etc. He also asked me about an experiment in class that I had done recently and what the independent, dependant, and control variables were. I was expecting it be way more difficult. He didn't ask questions like why I wanted to study physics but he did ask me what I wanted to be when I was older.

The economics interview was quite fun actually. He asked me why I wanted to study economics in the first place and I told him about the problem of 'infinite wants but finite resources' which he seemed impressed by. Remember to sound passionate. He also asked me some general economics question testing stuff like why we have prices on things. It's hard to explain but he asked questions on simple concepts in a confusing and more fundamental way. Then he asked me a game theory question based on the show 'Golden Balls' and it was quite simple if you worked out average winnings.

In the maths interviews, I thought they would give me questions on Q50 of the maths test which I got wrong. I was correct. I answered 4 or 5 questions and then got onto this longer one where I made a lot of progress but ran out of time. From what other people have said, getting 3 questions is great. The maths interviewer didn't ask me any questions like why I wanted to study maths, it was just me solving the questions he gave me.

Conclusion/Ending:

I went in thinking that it would be a lot harder than it was considering there would be a ton of kids from the top schools in the country, and a lot of international students. It was daunting, however, it turned out fine.

- Remember to revise (don't be like me).
- Always be interesting and unique and different in essentially all aspects.
- Try have good general knowledge
- Be passionate and ambitious
- Have extracurriculars like sport
- Read books (honestly I read few but still)

Hopefully this is useful. Let me know if you have any questions. I also applied to a lot of other schools including:

- St Paul's school
- Brighton College
- Marlborough College
- Millfield School
- Harrow School

Let me know if you want posts on them or any advice and if people who have been through the process of applying to top schools could write advice and their experience in this thread then that would be great.

Ask me anything and good luck
This is extremely helpful - I was wondering if you went to any of the open days? I'm an international student which I think makes it a bit more challenging to be accepted. I'm also applying to SPGS - is that similar to SPS?
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student_anon13
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(Original post by itsbhere)
This is extremely helpful - I was wondering if you went to any of the open days? I'm an international student which I think makes it a bit more challenging to be accepted. I'm also applying to SPGS - is that similar to SPS?
I couldn't be bothered to go to the open days in person but I watched about 5 minutes of an online recording they did of it (it might be on their Youtube channel?). I think the process to SPGS is somewhat similar to SPS but I don't think it's the same. I knew someone who applied there actually and they had exams and then subject specific interviews but I don't know anything more than that (I'm not in contact with that person anymore so I wouldn't be able to ask them, sorry).

Also I'm not 100% sure it's more challenging to be accepted if you are international. As far as I understand, they don't have any sort of quotas as such. However, you would only be eligible for the scholarship for girls; they don't offer bursaries for people outside the M25 area in London.

If it makes you feel better, when I was at the interviews literally EVERY SINGLE sixth former I met was an international student. There are loads of international students at the top private schools in the UK actually.
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student_anon13
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#10
(Original post by student_anon13)
About:

This is a small post for future generations planning to apply for Westminster School for sixth form (16+ entrance exam). I'm writing this because when I applied it was difficult to find the correct information and it was often quite scattered.

Context:

At the time of writing, I'm currently in year 11 and have finished all my sixth form (16+) entrance exams and interviews. I got offers from a number of schools including St Paul's School and Westminster School. In the end, I took the offer from St Paul's and rejected my offer from Westminster as they don't offer scholarships to boys at 16+ and don't give bursaries out to people living out of the M25 area.

In terms of revision, I did none. I had mocks and math olympiads at the time and I didn't really understand how I was meant to revise for something like this. I'll talk more about preparation later...

I applied for Maths, Further Maths, Physics, and Economics which is apparently one of the most common choices of subjects, if not the most.


Disclaimer:
The process changed the year I sat it (2021) so I wouldn't be surprised if they change it again.

Process:

First I'll talk about the exams. I had five papers: the personal statement, the maths paper, the further maths paper, and the economics paper. There were between 800 and 1000 people in the exam hall. The line was massive and took ages to get in.

The personal statement had four questions. I can't remember the questions exactly but they went along the lines of:

1) Why do you want to study at Westminster?
2) What extracurriculars do you do and what can you do for the school?
3) What do you think is a problem that society will face?
4) Write a tweet about your day to day life (or something like how people would describe you).

The first two questions are obviously standard and thus relatively straightforward to answer. When asked "Why Westminster?" don't reply with generic information like "It is very academic" because a) they already know and have heard that many times and b) there are many other schools which are very academic. Tell them something specific about the school that applies to you. For example, talk about a certain club/society they have that interests you. Talk about why you want to move in the first place and think of a genuinely good reason (even if there isn't one). For inspiration, the reason I applied to all these top schools is because my school is in the bottom 3% and I knew that I could propel myself forward if I had the chance to go to a school like Westminster. Obviously your circumstances might be different. Try to get extracurriculars and remember to talk about how they have helped you and what your plan for the future is with them.

The next two questions were interesting and were obviously trying to get an insight into your personality. Question three is pretty unpreparable unless you generally have a good general knowledge about things. Don't talk about something generic like "climate change" because you can not get more boring than that. Try to be creative and show off your intelligence. I wrote about the "Universe 25" experiment and overpopulation which I feel like basically no one would have written about which probably made me stand out. There are aprox 1000 people, why are you special? Question four wanted to know about what you do in day to day life. I kept it simple and just talked about what stuff I like doing in terms of academics and sport. I talked about the books I read and what I like to do when I'm not studying such as playing badminton.

The maths paper had 50 questions and were all multiple choice non-calc. It was based off the gcse syllabus and had problem solving mixed it. I'm pretty sure I got 49/50 as I accidentally rubbed out Q50 right at the end and ran out of time when I was trying to change Q49 (because I thought I had put the wrong answer down for Q49). I think generally doing UKMT stuff will suffice. As I said, I didn't prepare at all but I do a lot of math anyway. After speaking to others, there were a few who had also answered all the questions but a lot had run out of time.

The further maths paper had 8 questions which were a lot longer and tedious and it was non-calc. I answered all the questions and I'm pretty sure I got them all correct. After talking to other people, I realised that others had found it very difficult and couldn't answer many of them. These questions only required GCSE knowledge. It was a lot more problem solving though. I guess doing olympiads would help a lot. Side note: I think this was the first year they had a separate paper for further maths.

I found the physics paper quite difficult. It was like a gcse paper but it was also problem solving. There were multiple choice questions at the start and then long answer questions later. I'm not really good at physics but I was relieved to hear that others found it difficult. Apparently the chemistry paper was insanely difficult according to like everyone I spoke to. My advice would be to prepare for sciences a lot and do stuff like the intermediate physics challenge.

The economics paper started with some short answer questions. They didn't expect any knowledge but I had read an economics text book in year 9 before and it helped me. The first question told you about a concept known as "opportunity cost" and you had to apply it to some scenarios. There was also some graph interpreting questions. The short answer questions just required careful thinking. There was a long essay question on Covid Passports. It was basically asking you to analyse the effects of the introduction of Covid Passports. I think knowing about current affairs would have helped. If you study geography, you are at an advantage.

Now I'll take about the interviews. I think about 140 girls were invited for the interviews and about 20 boys but I'm not entirely sure. I had four interviews: a general interview, a maths interview, a physics interview, and an economics interview.

The general interview was asking questions trying to further understand me and my personality. One thing they asked me what books I had currently been reading. I immediately answered with a maths books and an economics book and I continued to talk about things I had learnt from them and how it was useful. You want to come off as academic and interested and passionate. They asked my why I wanted to move in the first place. They also asked me if I would accept their offer if they gave it to me which I thought was extremely strange. I said yes but I knew that I wasn't going to.

The physics interview as strange because my interviewer asked me what was my favourite topic and then asked me questions based on it. I said electricity was my favourite and the questions he asked me where quite basic. He just tested knowledge of series and parallel circuits as well as formulae etc. He also asked me about an experiment in class that I had done recently and what the independent, dependant, and control variables were. I was expecting it be way more difficult. He didn't ask questions like why I wanted to study physics but he did ask me what I wanted to be when I was older.

The economics interview was quite fun actually. He asked me why I wanted to study economics in the first place and I told him about the problem of 'infinite wants but finite resources' which he seemed impressed by. Remember to sound passionate. He also asked me some general economics question testing stuff like why we have prices on things. It's hard to explain but he asked questions on simple concepts in a confusing and more fundamental way. Then he asked me a game theory question based on the show 'Golden Balls' and it was quite simple if you worked out average winnings.

In the maths interviews, I thought they would give me questions on Q50 of the maths test which I got wrong. I was correct. I answered 4 or 5 questions and then got onto this longer one where I made a lot of progress but ran out of time. From what other people have said, getting 3 questions is great. The maths interviewer didn't ask me any questions like why I wanted to study maths, it was just me solving the questions he gave me.

Conclusion/Ending:

I went in thinking that it would be a lot harder than it was considering there would be a ton of kids from the top schools in the country, and a lot of international students. It was daunting, however, it turned out fine.

- Remember to revise (don't be like me).
- Always be interesting and unique and different in essentially all aspects.
- Try have good general knowledge
- Be passionate and ambitious
- Have extracurriculars like sport
- Read books (honestly I read few but still)

Hopefully this is useful. Let me know if you have any questions. I also applied to a lot of other schools including:

- St Paul's school
- Brighton College
- Marlborough College
- Millfield School
- Harrow School

Let me know if you want posts on them or any advice and if people who have been through the process of applying to top schools could write advice and their experience in this thread then that would be great.

Useful links:

Here is the old Westminster School thread for entrance in 2022:
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6804410
Here is the old Westminster School thread for entrance in 2021:
- https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6503450
Westminster School website:
- https://www.westminster.org.uk/
Useful Youtube videos on getting into Westminster:
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtmWYjTDKRs
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTXelMICWXY
Westminster School Youtube Channel:
- https://www.youtube.com/user/WestminsterSchoolUK

My goal with this post and giving out advice is to make it easier for students so please if people have advice and useful information then write a post under this thread.

Ask me anything and good luck.
I added some links that would be useful and cleaned up the post - have a look if you've missed anything.
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Chloeddw
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#11
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#11
(Original post by itsbhere)
heyy are you applying for 2023-2024?
I'm applying for 2023 September entry.

Which year are you in and which country are you from?
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itsbhere
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#12
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#12
same! I'm from Hong Kong.
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intrigue0
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#13
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#13
Hello, I want to go to Westminster too - I was wondering if you could expand on what kind of extracurriculars they'd like, how important they consider extracurriculars to be etc.
Also, do you have any advice on preparing for the UKISET test (if you took it?)
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student_anon13
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#14
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#14
(Original post by intrigue0)
Hello, I want to go to Westminster too - I was wondering if you could expand on what kind of extracurriculars they'd like, how important they consider extracurriculars to be etc.
Also, do you have any advice on preparing for the UKISET test (if you took it?)
I've never heard of UKISET so I won't be able to give you advice for that.

Extracurriculars are quite important I'd say. Doing math/science competitions would be very useful for both the exams and putting it on your personal statement and bringing it up on the interview. Reading books and being able to expand on the things you've learnt in them will be useful as I was asked what books I had read in my interview and it also comes off as very academic. Also try to do get involved with sports as well since, despite Westminster being focused on academics more, I think that if you're well rounded then they'll be more impressed. Basically try to get involved with loads of things and pick up interests (they'll like people who are passionate about their subject choices as well as things they're not going to be studying formally). There's no 'formula' to get into Westminster so just try to improve in all areas with a major focus on academics.
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susiezzzbblol
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#15
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#15
(Original post by Chloeddw)
I'm applying for 2023 September entry.

Which year are you in and which country are you from?
hi again, saw you in the UKMT post a month ago. Im want to apply for 2024 September entry.
Hopefully i can see you in westminister
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susiezzzbblol
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#16
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#16
(Original post by student_anon13)
I can usually get a near perfect score in IMC and SMC. I doubt you would need that to get in.
Thank you for the post. May I ask what you got in the second round of IMC and SMC (potentially Maths Olympiad)?
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student_anon13
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#17
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#17
(Original post by susiezzzbblol)
Thank you for the post. May I ask what you got in the second round of IMC and SMC (potentially Maths Olympiad)?
I've messed up every math competition and olympiad I've done so far but in year 9 I got 101 in the IMC (I was just bad) , in year 10 I got 128 in the IMC (messed up on a simple question) and 109 in the SMC (messed up on a question and was still kinda bad), in year 11 I got 119 on the IMC (On question 4 and 5 I put answers down that I didn't intend to - I managed to finesse the question sheet out with my circled answers and I got all the questions right but I must have put down different answers on the actual answer sheet xd - so I should've got 129 and then hesitated q20 and didn't put an answer down xd) and I did terrible in the SMC and got like 90 or something (this is actually quite typical to see a drop in SMC scores as most people just start to focus on olympiads and thus neglect the SMC and so become rusty on it so I wouldn't worry if the same happens to you. In olympiads I've participated in the Hamilton, Macluarin, BMO1, and HMMT when it was online. I've messed all of them up also and only managed to get merits and distinctions.

I wouldn't use those results to compare yourself to someone who got into Westminster and these other schools. I have terrible exam practice (also, I got in contact with an IMO participant to give me advice and they told me to practice olympiads under timed conditions which I thought would be useful for others in the same boat). When practising at home, I've often gotten perfect scores in the Maclaurin olympiad and 40-50 range in BMO1. In BMO2 I can usually get at least 10 but occasionally 20 and in the 2009 BMO2 I got 30. I can also solve most of the earlier IMOSL problems.

In the IMC I think getting into the next olympiad round generally means you're in the safe zone in terms of your application to top schools.

Of course though, there isn't a perfect correlation between competition/olympiads and the Westminster examinations. It definitely helps though. The second to last question on the further maths paper was basically proving the AM-GM inequality and I had known this previously due to Olympiads. I asked many people and I was pretty sure I was the only one to get that one correct.

TLDR: If you are applying for maths (especially further maths) then def practice olympiad stuff and read interesting books on maths which you can talk about in the interviews.
Last edited by student_anon13; 1 month ago
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Vamsi_Kothapalli
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#18
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#18
Thank you for the post. Could you give examples of what type (topics) of questions you got in the further maths/maths paper? Also, is the further maths paper multiple choice or written response?
Last edited by Vamsi_Kothapalli; 1 month ago
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susiezzzbblol
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#19
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#19
(Original post by student_anon13)
I've messed up every math competition and olympiad I've done so far but in year 9 I got 101 in the IMC (I was just bad) , in year 10 I got 128 in the IMC (messed up on a simple question) and 109 in the SMC (messed up on a question and was still kinda bad), in year 11 I got 119 on the IMC (On question 4 and 5 I put answers down that I didn't intend to - I managed to finesse the question sheet out with my circled answers and I got all the questions right but I must have put down different answers on the actual answer sheet xd - so I should've got 129 and then hesitated q20 and didn't put an answer down xd) and I did terrible in the SMC and got like 90 or something (this is actually quite typical to see a drop in SMC scores as most people just start to focus on olympiads and thus neglect the SMC and so become rusty on it so I wouldn't worry if the same happens to you. In olympiads I've participated in the Hamilton, Macluarin, BMO1, and HMMT when it was online. I've messed all of them up also and only managed to get merits and distinctions.

I wouldn't use those results to compare yourself to someone who got into Westminster and these other schools. I have terrible exam practice (also, I got in contact with an IMO participant to give me advice and they told me to practice olympiads under timed conditions which I thought would be useful for others in the same boat). When practising at home, I've often gotten perfect scores in the Maclaurin olympiad and 40-50 range in BMO1. In BMO2 I can usually get at least 10 but occasionally 20 and in the 2009 BMO2 I got 30. I can also solve most of the earlier IMOSL problems.

In the IMC I think getting into the next olympiad round generally means you're in the safe zone in terms of your application to top schools.

Of course though, there isn't a perfect correlation between competition/olympiads and the Westminster examinations. It definitely helps though. The second to last question on the further maths paper was basically proving the AM-GM inequality and I had known this previously due to Olympiads. I asked many people and I was pretty sure I was the only one to get that one correct.

TLDR: If you are applying for maths (especially further maths) then def practice olympiad stuff and read interesting books on maths which you can talk about in the interviews.
Thank you for your reply. From what you have written, I am assuming that you get asked questions relating to the subjects you have chosen for a level. Can you give some recommendations of the books you read for maths, sciences and economics?
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student_anon13
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Vamsi_Kothapalli)
Thank you for the post. Could you give examples of what type (topics) of questions you got in the further maths/maths paper? Also, is the further maths paper multiple choice or written response?
It's hard to give you topics and it would be fairly pointless to anyways since the exams will be different. I don't remember any questions on statistics though so perhaps don't put too much focus into that.

The further maths was long answer 'proof' type questions similar to Olympiads.
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